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  • 1
    Publication Date: 2010-06-22
    Description: The molecular clock maintains energy constancy by producing circadian oscillations of rate-limiting enzymes involved in tissue metabolism across the day and night. During periods of feeding, pancreatic islets secrete insulin to maintain glucose homeostasis, and although rhythmic control of insulin release is recognized to be dysregulated in humans with diabetes, it is not known how the circadian clock may affect this process. Here we show that pancreatic islets possess self-sustained circadian gene and protein oscillations of the transcription factors CLOCK and BMAL1. The phase of oscillation of islet genes involved in growth, glucose metabolism and insulin signalling is delayed in circadian mutant mice, and both Clock and Bmal1 (also called Arntl) mutants show impaired glucose tolerance, reduced insulin secretion and defects in size and proliferation of pancreatic islets that worsen with age. Clock disruption leads to transcriptome-wide alterations in the expression of islet genes involved in growth, survival and synaptic vesicle assembly. Notably, conditional ablation of the pancreatic clock causes diabetes mellitus due to defective beta-cell function at the very latest stage of stimulus-secretion coupling. These results demonstrate a role for the beta-cell clock in coordinating insulin secretion with the sleep-wake cycle, and reveal that ablation of the pancreatic clock can trigger the onset of diabetes mellitus.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2920067/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2920067/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Marcheva, Biliana -- Ramsey, Kathryn Moynihan -- Buhr, Ethan D -- Kobayashi, Yumiko -- Su, Hong -- Ko, Caroline H -- Ivanova, Ganka -- Omura, Chiaki -- Mo, Shelley -- Vitaterna, Martha H -- Lopez, James P -- Philipson, Louis H -- Bradfield, Christopher A -- Crosby, Seth D -- JeBailey, Lellean -- Wang, Xiaozhong -- Takahashi, Joseph S -- Bass, Joseph -- P01 AG011412/AG/NIA NIH HHS/ -- P01 AG011412-080011/AG/NIA NIH HHS/ -- R01 HL097817/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS/ -- R01 HL097817-01/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS/ -- R37 ES005703/ES/NIEHS NIH HHS/ -- R37-ES-005703/ES/NIEHS NIH HHS/ -- Howard Hughes Medical Institute/ -- England -- Nature. 2010 Jul 29;466(7306):627-31. doi: 10.1038/nature09253.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Medicine, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois 60611, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20562852" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: ARNTL Transcription Factors/deficiency/*genetics/metabolism ; Aging/genetics/pathology ; Animals ; Blood Glucose/analysis/metabolism ; CLOCK Proteins/deficiency/*genetics/metabolism ; Cell Proliferation ; Cell Size ; Cell Survival ; Circadian Rhythm/genetics/*physiology ; Diabetes Mellitus/genetics/*metabolism ; Gene Expression Profiling ; Glucose Intolerance/genetics ; Glucose Tolerance Test ; In Vitro Techniques ; Insulin/*blood/metabolism/secretion ; Islets of Langerhans/*metabolism/pathology/secretion ; Mice ; Period Circadian Proteins/genetics/metabolism ; Phenotype ; Sleep/genetics/physiology ; Synaptic Vesicles/metabolism ; Wakefulness/genetics/physiology
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 2
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    American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS)
    Publication Date: 1994-06-17
    Description: Modern molecular genetic and genomic approaches are revolutionizing the study of behavior in the mouse. "Reverse genetics" (from gene to phenotype) with targeted gene transfer provides a powerful tool to dissect behavior and has been used successfully to study the effects of null mutations in genes implicated in the regulation of long-term potentiation and spatial learning in mice. In addition, "forward genetics" (from phenotype to gene) with high-efficiency mutagenesis in the mouse can uncover unknown genes and has been used to isolate a behavioral mutant of the circadian system. With the recent availability of high-density genetic maps and physical mapping resources, positional cloning of virtually any mutation is now feasible in the mouse. Together, these approaches permit a molecular analysis of both known and previously unknown genes regulating behavior.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3830945/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3830945/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Takahashi, J S -- Pinto, L H -- Vitaterna, M H -- EY08467/EY/NEI NIH HHS/ -- MH39592/MH/NIMH NIH HHS/ -- MH49241/MH/NIMH NIH HHS/ -- Howard Hughes Medical Institute/ -- etc. -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 1994 Jun 17;264(5166):1724-33.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Neurobiology and Physiology, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL 60208.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8209253" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; *Behavior, Animal ; Circadian Rhythm/genetics ; Female ; *Genetic Techniques ; Genetics, Behavioral/*methods ; Learning ; Long-Term Potentiation ; Male ; Mice ; Mice, Inbred Strains ; Mice, Knockout ; Mutagenesis
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 3
    Publication Date: 1998-11-20
    Description: Cryptochromes are photoactive pigments in the eye that have been proposed to function as circadian photopigments. Mice lacking the cryptochrome 2 blue-light photoreceptor gene (mCry2) were tested for circadian clock-related functions. The mutant mice had a lower sensitivity to acute light induction of mPer1 in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) but exhibited normal circadian oscillations of mPer1 and mCry1 messenger RNA in the SCN. Behaviorally, the mutants had an intrinsic circadian period about 1 hour longer than normal and exhibited high-amplitude phase shifts in response to light pulses administered at circadian time 17. These data are consistent with the hypothesis that CRY2 protein modulates circadian responses in mice and suggest that cryptochromes have a role in circadian photoreception in mammals.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Thresher, R J -- Vitaterna, M H -- Miyamoto, Y -- Kazantsev, A -- Hsu, D S -- Petit, C -- Selby, C P -- Dawut, L -- Smithies, O -- Takahashi, J S -- Sancar, A -- GM20069/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- GM31082/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- P0 AG11412/AG/NIA NIH HHS/ -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 1998 Nov 20;282(5393):1490-4.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics, University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9822380" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Cell Cycle Proteins ; Circadian Rhythm/*physiology ; Cryptochromes ; *Drosophila Proteins ; *Eye Proteins ; Female ; Flavoproteins/genetics/*physiology ; Gene Expression Regulation ; Gene Targeting ; In Situ Hybridization ; *Light ; Male ; Mice ; Mice, Inbred C57BL ; Motor Activity ; Mutation ; Nuclear Proteins/genetics ; Period Circadian Proteins ; *Photoreceptor Cells, Invertebrate ; Photoreceptor Cells, Vertebrate/*physiology ; Receptors, G-Protein-Coupled ; Suprachiasmatic Nucleus/metabolism
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 4
    Publication Date: 2013-12-21
    Description: The inbred mouse C57BL/6J is the reference strain for genome sequence and for most behavioral and physiological phenotypes. However, the International Knockout Mouse Consortium uses an embryonic stem cell line derived from a related C57BL/6N substrain. We found that C57BL/6N has a lower acute and sensitized response to cocaine and methamphetamine. We mapped a single causative locus and identified a nonsynonymous mutation of serine to phenylalanine (S968F) in Cytoplasmic FMRP interacting protein 2 (Cyfip2) as the causative variant. The S968F mutation destabilizes CYFIP2, and deletion of the C57BL/6N mutant allele leads to acute and sensitized cocaine-response phenotypes. We propose that CYFIP2 is a key regulator of cocaine response in mammals and present a framework to use mouse substrains to identify previously unknown genes and alleles regulating behavior.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4500108/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4500108/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Kumar, Vivek -- Kim, Kyungin -- Joseph, Chryshanthi -- Kourrich, Said -- Yoo, Seung-Hee -- Huang, Hung Chung -- Vitaterna, Martha H -- de Villena, Fernando Pardo-Manuel -- Churchill, Gary -- Bonci, Antonello -- Takahashi, Joseph S -- F32 DA024556/DA/NIDA NIH HHS/ -- F32DA024556/DA/NIDA NIH HHS/ -- U01 MH061915/MH/NIMH NIH HHS/ -- U01MH61915/MH/NIMH NIH HHS/ -- Howard Hughes Medical Institute/ -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2013 Dec 20;342(6165):1508-12. doi: 10.1126/science.1245503.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Neuroscience, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX 75390-9111, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24357318" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Amino Acid Substitution ; Animals ; Central Nervous System Stimulants/administration & dosage ; Cocaine/*administration & dosage ; Cocaine-Related Disorders/*genetics/*psychology ; *Drug-Seeking Behavior ; Methamphetamine/administration & dosage ; Mice ; Mice, Inbred C57BL ; Mice, Knockout ; Motor Activity/drug effects ; Mutation ; Nerve Tissue Proteins/genetics/*physiology ; Phenylalanine/genetics ; Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide ; Psychomotor Performance/drug effects ; Quantitative Trait Loci ; Serine/genetics
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 5
    Publication Date: 1994-04-29
    Description: In a search for genes that regulate circadian rhythms in mammals, the progeny of mice treated with N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU) were screened for circadian clock mutations. A semidominant mutation, Clock, that lengthens circadian period and abolishes persistence of rhythmicity was identified. Clock segregated as a single gene that mapped to the midportion of mouse chromosome 5, a region syntenic to human chromosome 4. The power of ENU mutagenesis combined with the ability to clone murine genes by map position provides a generally applicable approach to study complex behavior in mammals.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3839659/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3839659/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Vitaterna, M H -- King, D P -- Chang, A M -- Kornhauser, J M -- Lowrey, P L -- McDonald, J D -- Dove, W F -- Pinto, L H -- Turek, F W -- Takahashi, J S -- P30-CA07175/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01-DK40493/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- T32 NS071040/NS/NINDS NIH HHS/ -- Howard Hughes Medical Institute/ -- etc. -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 1994 Apr 29;264(5159):719-25.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Neurobiology and Physiology, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL 60208.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8171325" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; *Chromosome Mapping ; Chromosomes, Human, Pair 4 ; Circadian Rhythm/*genetics ; Ethylnitrosourea ; Female ; *Genes ; Genotype ; Humans ; Male ; Mice ; Mice, Inbred C57BL ; *Mutagenesis ; Phenotype
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 6
    Publication Date: 2013-12-19
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 7
    Publication Date: 2019
    Description: 〈p〉To understand the health impact of long-duration spaceflight, one identical twin astronaut was monitored before, during, and after a 1-year mission onboard the International Space Station; his twin served as a genetically matched ground control. Longitudinal assessments identified spaceflight-specific changes, including decreased body mass, telomere elongation, genome instability, carotid artery distension and increased intima-media thickness, altered ocular structure, transcriptional and metabolic changes, DNA methylation changes in immune and oxidative stress–related pathways, gastrointestinal microbiota alterations, and some cognitive decline postflight. Although average telomere length, global gene expression, and microbiome changes returned to near preflight levels within 6 months after return to Earth, increased numbers of short telomeres were observed and expression of some genes was still disrupted. These multiomic, molecular, physiological, and behavioral datasets provide a valuable roadmap of the putative health risks for future human spaceflight.〈/p〉
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 8
    Publication Date: 2018-07-26
    Description: To understand the transcriptomic organization underlying sleep and affective function, we studied a population of (C57BL/6J x 129S1/SvImJ) F2 mice by measuring 283 affective and sleep phenotypes and profiling gene expression across four brain regions. We identified converging molecular bases for sleep and affective phenotypes at both the single-gene and gene-network levels. Using publicly available transcriptomic datasets collected from sleep-deprived mice and patients with major depressive disorder (MDD), we identified three cortical gene networks altered by the sleep/wake state and depression. The network-level actions of sleep loss and depression were opposite to each other, providing a mechanistic basis for the sleep disruptions commonly observed in depression, as well as the reported acute antidepressant effects of sleep deprivation. We highlight one particular network composed of circadian rhythm regulators and neuronal activity–dependent immediate-early genes. The key upstream driver of this network, Arc , may act as a nexus linking sleep and depression. Our data provide mechanistic insights into the role of sleep in affective function and MDD.
    Electronic ISSN: 2375-2548
    Topics: Natural Sciences in General
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