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  • 1
    Publication Date: 2016-03-02
    Description: Phase transitional, dielectric, electro-optical, polarizing optical microscopic, photoluminescence (PL), and Fourier transformed infrared (FTIR) spectroscopic measurements have been carried out on ZnS:Mn quantum dots (QDs) dispersed ferroelectric liquid crystal (FLC). A new dielectric relaxation mode has been envisaged in FLC material due to the presence of 0.25 wt. % ZnS:Mn (40 mol. %) QDs. The characteristics of the new mode have been compared with those of the soft mode. A significant fastening of the electro-optical response (∼75%) has been observed in the case of 0.25 wt. % ZnS:Mn (20 mol. %) QDs doped FLC material. The induction of the new relaxation mode is attributed to the flexoelectric tilt fluctuations. The induced flexoelectric polarization in the FLC medium at the vicinity of QDs might be responsible for the enhanced spontaneous polarization in the FLC/QDs mixtures. Quenching in PL for the FLC/QDs mixtures has been observed, which strongly depends on Mn content in QDs. The change in FTIR spectra for the FLC/QDs composite clearly indicates the change in molecular dynamics of the pure FLC after the dispersion of QDs. The presented results will certainly pave a way to utilize QDs for obtaining faster response of the FLC material and potential material to tune the relaxation processes.
    Print ISSN: 0021-8979
    Electronic ISSN: 1089-7550
    Topics: Physics
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  • 2
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    In:  Geophys. Prospecting, New York, Am. Soc. Mech. Eng., vol. 19, no. 2, pp. 412-429, pp. L24306, (ISBN: 0534351875, 2nd edition)
    Publication Date: 1971
    Keywords: Rayleigh waves ; Layers ; Channel waves
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  • 3
    Publication Date: 2014-04-30
    Description: Speciation generally involves a three-step process--range expansion, range fragmentation and the development of reproductive isolation between spatially separated populations. Speciation relies on cycling through these three steps and each may limit the rate at which new species form. We estimate phylogenetic relationships among all Himalayan songbirds to ask whether the development of reproductive isolation and ecological competition, both factors that limit range expansions, set an ultimate limit on speciation. Based on a phylogeny for all 358 species distributed along the eastern elevational gradient, here we show that body size and shape differences evolved early in the radiation, with the elevational band occupied by a species evolving later. These results are consistent with competition for niche space limiting species accumulation. Even the elevation dimension seems to be approaching ecological saturation, because the closest relatives both inside the assemblage and elsewhere in the Himalayas are on average separated by more than five million years, which is longer than it generally takes for reproductive isolation to be completed; also, elevational distributions are well explained by resource availability, notably the abundance of arthropods, and not by differences in diversification rates in different elevational zones. Our results imply that speciation rate is ultimately set by niche filling (that is, ecological competition for resources), rather than by the rate of acquisition of reproductive isolation.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Price, Trevor D -- Hooper, Daniel M -- Buchanan, Caitlyn D -- Johansson, Ulf S -- Tietze, D Thomas -- Alstrom, Per -- Olsson, Urban -- Ghosh-Harihar, Mousumi -- Ishtiaq, Farah -- Gupta, Sandeep K -- Martens, Jochen -- Harr, Bettina -- Singh, Pratap -- Mohan, Dhananjai -- England -- Nature. 2014 May 8;509(7499):222-5. doi: 10.1038/nature13272. Epub 2014 Apr 30.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Ecology and Evolution, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637, USA. ; 1] Department of Ecology and Evolution, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637, USA [2] Department of Zoology, Swedish Museum of Natural History, 10405 Stockholm, Sweden. ; 1] Department of Ecology and Evolution, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637, USA [2] Institute of Pharmacy and Molecular Biotechnology, University of Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 364, 69120 Heidelberg, Germany. ; 1] Key Laboratory of Zoological Systematics and Evolution, Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 1 Beichen West Road, Chaoyang District, Beijing 100101, China [2] Swedish Species Information Centre, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Box 7007, 75007 Uppsala, Sweden. ; Systematics and Biodiversity, Department of Biology and Environmental Sciences, University of Gothenburg, 40530 Gothenburg, Sweden. ; Wildlife Institute of India, PO Box 18, Chandrabani, Dehradun 248001, India. ; Institute of Zoology, Johannes Gutenberg University, Mainz 55099, Germany. ; Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology, August Thienemannstrasse 2, 24306 Plon, Germany.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24776798" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: *Altitude ; Animals ; Body Size ; China ; *Ecosystem ; *Genetic Speciation ; India ; Phylogeny ; Reproduction ; Songbirds/anatomy & histology/*classification/*physiology ; Tibet
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 4
    Publication Date: 2016-10-21
    Description: Author(s): P. K. Mohanty, K. P. Arunbabu, T. Aziz, S. R. Dugad, S. K. Gupta, B. Hariharan, P. Jagadeesan, A. Jain, S. D. Morris, B. S. Rao, Y. Hayashi, S. Kawakami, A. Oshima, S. Shibata, S. Raha, P. Subramanian, and H. Kojima Observations with India’s cosmic-ray telescope indicate that Earth’s magnetic field weakened during a 2015 geomagnetic storm, allowing cosmic rays to pass through. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 117, 171101] Published Thu Oct 20, 2016
    Keywords: Gravitation and Astrophysics
    Print ISSN: 0031-9007
    Electronic ISSN: 1079-7114
    Topics: Physics
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  • 5
    Publication Date: 2016-01-28
    Description: Silicon Photo-Multipliers (SiPMs) are increasingly becoming popular for discrete photon counting applications due to the wealth of advantages they offer over conventional photo-detectors such as photo-multiplier tubes and hybrid photo-diodes. SiPMs are used in variety of applications ranging from high energy physics and nuclear physics experiments to medical diagnostics. The gain of a SiPM is directly proportional to the difference between applied and breakdown voltage of the device. However, the breakdown voltage depends critically on the ambient temperature and has a large temperature co-efficient in the range of 40-60 mV/°C resulting in a typical gain variation of 3%-5%/°C [Dinu et al. , in IEEE Nuclear Science Symposium, Medical Imaging Conference and 17th Room Temperature Semiconductor Detector Workshop (IEEE, 2010), p. 215]. We plan to use the SiPM as a replacement for PMT in the cosmic ray experiment (GRAPES-3) at Ooty [Gupta et al. , Nucl. Instrum. Methods Phys. Res., Sect. A 540 , 311 (2005)]. There the SiPMs will be operated in an outdoor environment subjected to temperature variation of about 15 °C over a day. A gain variation of more than 50% was observed for such large variations in the temperature. To stabilize the gain of the SiPM under such operating conditions, a low-cost, multi-channel programmable power supply (0-90 V) was designed that simultaneously provides the bias voltage to 16 SiPMs. The programmable power supply (PPS) was designed to automatically adjust the operating voltage for each channel with a built-in closed loop temperature feedback mechanism. The PPS provides bias voltage with a precision of 6 mV and measures the load current with a precision of 1 nA. Using this PPS, a gain stability of 0.5% for SiPM (Hamamatsu, S10931-050P) has been demonstrated over a wide temperature range of 15 °C. The design methodology of the PPS system, its validation, and the results of the tests carried out on the SiPM is presented in this article. The proposed design also has the capability of gain stabilization of devices with non-linear thermal response.
    Print ISSN: 0034-6748
    Electronic ISSN: 1089-7623
    Topics: Electrical Engineering, Measurement and Control Technology , Physics
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  • 6
    Publication Date: 2019
    Description: Agricultural scientists face the dual challenge of breeding input-responsive, widely adoptable and climate-resilient varieties of crop plants and developing such varieties at a faster pace. Integrating the gains of genomics with modern-day phenomics will lead to increased breeding efficiency which in turn offers great promise to develop such varieties rapidly. Plant phenotyping techniques have impressively evolved during the last two decades. The low-cost, automated and semi-automated methods for data acquisition, storage and analysis are now available which allow precise quantitative analysis of plant structure and function; and genetic dissection of complex traits. Appropriate plant types can now be quickly developed that respond favorably to low input and resource-limited environments and address the challenges of subsistence agriculture. The present review focuses on the need of systematic, rapid, minimal invasive and low-cost plant phenotyping. It also discusses its evolution to modern day high throughput phenotyping (HTP), traits amenable to HTP, integration of HTP with genomics and the scope of utilizing these tools for crop improvement.
    Electronic ISSN: 2073-4395
    Topics: Agriculture, Forestry, Horticulture, Fishery, Domestic Science, Nutrition , Economics
    Published by MDPI
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  • 7
    Publication Date: 2018-04-18
    Description: Author(s): P. K. Mohanty, K. P. Arunbabu, T. Aziz, S. R. Dugad, S. K. Gupta, B. Hariharan, P. Jagadeesan, A. Jain, S. D. Morris, P. K. Nayak, P. S. Rakshe, K. Ramesh, B. S. Rao, M. Zuberi, Y. Hayashi, S. Kawakami, P. Subramanian, S. Raha, S. Ahmad, A. Oshima, S. Shibata, and H. Kojima The GRAPES-3 muon telescope in Ooty, India had claimed detection of a 2 hour (h) high-energy ( ∼ 20     GeV ) burst of galactic cosmic-rays (GCRs) through a 〉 50 σ surge in GeV muons, was caused by reconnection of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) in the magnetosphere that led to transient weakenin... [Phys. Rev. D 97, 082001] Published Tue Apr 17, 2018
    Keywords: Experiments in gravity, cosmology, cosmic rays
    Print ISSN: 0556-2821
    Electronic ISSN: 1089-4918
    Topics: Physics
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  • 8
    Publication Date: 1990-08-10
    Description: The stimulation of phospholipase A2 by thrombin and type 2 (P2)-purinergic receptor agonists in Chinese hamster ovary cells is mediated by the G protein Gi. To delineate alpha chain regulatory regions responsible for control of phospholipase A2, chimeric cDNAs were constructed in which different lengths of the alpha subunit of Gs (alpha s) were replaced with the corresponding sequence of the Gi alpha subunit (alpha i2). When a carboxyl-terminal chimera alpha s-i(38), which has the last 38 amino acids of alpha s substituted with the last 36 residues of alpha i2, was expressed in Chinese hamster ovary cells, the receptor-stimulated phospholipase A2 activity was inhibited, although the chimera could still activate adenylyl cyclase. Thus, alpha s-i(38) is an active alpha s, but also a dominant negative alpha i molecule, indicating that the last 36 amino acids of alpha i2 are a critical domain for G protein regulation of phospholipase A2 activity.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Gupta, S K -- Diez, E -- Heasley, L E -- Osawa, S -- Johnson, G L -- DK37871/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- GM30324/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 1990 Aug 10;249(4969):662-6.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Division of Basic Sciences, National Jewish Center for Immunology and Respiratory Medicine, Denver, CO 80206.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/2166341" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Adenosine Triphosphate/pharmacology ; Animals ; Arachidonic Acid ; Arachidonic Acids/metabolism ; Cell Line ; Chlorides/pharmacology ; Enzyme Activation ; GTP-Binding Proteins/*genetics/metabolism ; Inositol Phosphates/metabolism ; Kinetics ; Lithium/pharmacology ; Lithium Chloride ; Macromolecular Substances ; *Mutation ; Phospholipases/*metabolism ; Phospholipases A/*metabolism ; Phospholipases A2 ; Receptors, Purinergic/drug effects/*physiology ; Restriction Mapping ; Thrombin/antagonists & inhibitors/*pharmacology ; Transfection
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 9
    Publication Date: 1996-08-16
    Description: Small synthetic molecules termed growth hormone secretagogues (GHSs) act on the pituitary gland and the hypothalamus to stimulate and amplify pulsatile growth hormone (GH) release. A heterotrimeric GTP-binding protein (G protein)-coupled receptor (GPC-R) of the pituitary and arcuate ventro-medial and infundibular hypothalamus of swine and humans was cloned and was shown to be the target of the GHSs. On the basis of its pharmacological and molecular characterization, this GPC-R defines a neuroendocrine pathway for the control of pulsatile GH release and supports the notion that the GHSs mimic an undiscovered hormone.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Howard, A D -- Feighner, S D -- Cully, D F -- Arena, J P -- Liberator, P A -- Rosenblum, C I -- Hamelin, M -- Hreniuk, D L -- Palyha, O C -- Anderson, J -- Paress, P S -- Diaz, C -- Chou, M -- Liu, K K -- McKee, K K -- Pong, S S -- Chaung, L Y -- Elbrecht, A -- Dashkevicz, M -- Heavens, R -- Rigby, M -- Sirinathsinghji, D J -- Dean, D C -- Melillo, D G -- Patchett, A A -- Nargund, R -- Griffin, P R -- DeMartino, J A -- Gupta, S K -- Schaeffer, J M -- Smith, R G -- Van der Ploeg, L H -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 1996 Aug 16;273(5277):974-7.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Merck Research Laboratories, Rahway, NJ 07065, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8688086" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Amino Acid Sequence ; Animals ; Base Sequence ; Cell Line ; Codon ; DNA, Complementary/genetics ; GTP-Binding Proteins/metabolism ; Growth Hormone/*secretion ; Hormones/*metabolism ; Humans ; Hypothalamus, Middle/chemistry ; Indoles/*metabolism/pharmacology ; Macaca mulatta ; Molecular Sequence Data ; Oligopeptides/*metabolism ; Pituitary Gland/chemistry ; RNA, Complementary/genetics ; Rats ; Receptors, Cell Surface/analysis/chemistry/genetics/*metabolism ; *Receptors, G-Protein-Coupled ; Receptors, Ghrelin ; Spiro Compounds/*metabolism/pharmacology ; Swine
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 10
    Publication Date: 2018-07-10
    Description: Author(s): H. Kojima, K. P. Arunbabu, S. R. Dugad, S. K. Gupta, B. Hariharan, P. Jagadeesan, A. Jain, P. K. Mohanty, P. S. Rakshe, K. Ramesh, B. S. Rao, Y. Hayashi, S. Kawakami, T. Nonaka, A. Oshima, S. Shibata, K. Tanaka, and M. Tokumaru The flux of galactic cosmic rays (GCRs) is isotropic in the interstellar space. However, in the heliosphere, the ram pressure of outward-moving solar wind convects the GCRs away from the Sun, thereby producing a density gradient in the radial direction. The diffusion of GCRs due to this gradient and... [Phys. Rev. D 98, 022004] Published Mon Jul 09, 2018
    Keywords: Experiments in gravity, cosmology, cosmic rays
    Print ISSN: 0556-2821
    Electronic ISSN: 1089-4918
    Topics: Physics
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