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    PANGAEA
    In:  Supplement to: Marchitto, Thomas M; Oppo, Delia W; Curry, William B (2002): Paired benthic foraminiferal Cd/Ca and Zn/Ca evidence for a greatly increased presence of Southern Ocean Water in the glacial North Atlantic. Paleoceanography, 17(3), 10-1-10-18, https://doi.org/10.1029/2000PA000598
    Publication Date: 2020-01-17
    Description: Benthic foraminiferal d13C and Cd/Ca studies suggest that deep Atlantic circulation during the Last Glacial Maximum was very different from today, with high-nutrient (low d13C, high Cd) deep Southern Ocean Water (SOW) penetrating far into the North Atlantic. However, if some glacial d13C values are biased by productivity artifacts and/or air-sea exchange processes, then the existing d13C data may be consistent with the continual dominance of North Atlantic Deep Water (NADW). Cibicidoides wuellerstorfi Cd/Ca results presented here indicate that the glacial North Atlantic was strongly enriched in dissolved Cd below ~2500 m depth. If NADW formation was still vigorous relative to SOW formation, these data could be explained by either increased preformed nutrient levels in the high-latitude North Atlantic or by increased organic matter remineralization within lower NADW. High glacial Zn/Ca values in the same samples, however, are best explained by a substantially increased mixing with Zn-rich SOW. The cause was most likely a partial replacement of NADW by less dense Glacial North Atlantic Intermediate Water. This reorganization also lowered deep North Atlantic [CO3]2- concentrations by perhaps 10 to 15 µmol/kg.
    Type: Dataset
    Format: text/tab-separated-values, 445 data points
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