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  • Other Sources  (3)
  • American Chemical Society (ACS)
  • 1
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    American Chemical Society (ACS)
    In:  Industrial & Engineering Chemistry Research, 56 (44). pp. 12755-12762.
    Publication Date: 2019-02-01
    Description: The discharges from industrial processes constitute the main source of copper contamination in aqueous ecosystems. In this study we investigated the capacity of different types of biochar (derived from chicken manure, eucalyptus, corncob, olive mill and pine sawdust) to remove copper from aqueous solution in a continuous-flow system. The flow rate of the system strongly influenced the amount of copper retained. The adsorption to the corncob biochar varied from 5.51 to 3.48 mg Cu g-1 as the flux decreased from 13 to 2.5 mL min-1. The physicochemical characteristics of biochar determine the copper retention capacity and the underlying immobilization mechanisms. Biochars with high inorganic contents retain the largest amounts of copper and may be suitable for using in water treatment systems to remove heavy metals. The copper retention capacity of the biochars ranged between ~1.3 and 26 mg g-1 and varied in the following order: chicken manure 〉 olive mill 〉〉 corncob 〉 eucalyptus 〉 sawdust pine.
    Type: Article , PeerReviewed
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  • 2
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    American Chemical Society (ACS)
    In:  Industrial & Engineering Chemistry Research, 53 (17). pp. 6998-7007.
    Publication Date: 2018-01-03
    Description: Structure I methane hydrates are formed in situ from water-in-mineral oil emulsions in a high pressure rheometer cell. Viscosity is measured as hydrates form, grow, change under flow, and dissociate. Experiments are performed at varying water volume fraction in the original emulsion (0–0.40), temperature (0–6 °C), and initial pressure of methane (750–1500 psig). Hydrate slurries exhibit a sharp increase in viscosity upon hydrate formation, followed by complex behavior dictated by factors including continued hydrate formation, shear alignment, methane depletion/dissolution, aggregate formation, and capillary bridging. Hydrate slurries possess a yield stress and are shear-thinning fluids, which are described by the Cross model. Hydrate slurry viscosity and yield stress increased with increasing water volume fraction. As driving force for hydrate formation decreases (increasing temperature, decreasing pressure), hydrate slurry viscosity increases, suggesting that slower hydrate formation leads to larger and more porous aggregates. In total, addition of water to a methane saturated oil can cause more than a fifty-fold increase in viscosity if hydrates form.
    Type: Article , PeerReviewed
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  • 3
    Publication Date: 2018-02-20
    Description: Innate immunity is the front line of self-defense against microbial infection. After searching for natural substances that regulate innate immunity using an ex vivo Drosophila culture system, we identified a novel dimeric chromanone, gonytolide A, as an innate immune promoter from the fungus Gonytrichum sp. along with gonytolides B and C. Gonytolide A also increased TNF-α-stimulated production of IL-8 in human umbilical vein endothelial cells.
    Type: Article , PeerReviewed
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