ALBERT

All Library Books, journals and Electronic Records Telegrafenberg

Your email was sent successfully. Check your inbox.

An error occurred while sending the email. Please try again.

Proceed reservation?

Export
  • 1
    ISSN: 1432-1254
    Keywords: Landsnails ; Population ; Natural control ; Weather ; Growth
    Source: Springer Online Journal Archives 1860-2000
    Topics: Geography , Physics
    Notes: Abstract Natural populations of the landsnailTheba pisana (Pulmonata: Helicidae) were studied in the Mediterranean coastal plains of Israel. The life cycle is annual. Egg-laying occurs in the winter and the descendants grow fast during the spring, except for a part of the population the ceases growing. These individuals, termed “infantiles”, retain immature size and shape and a rudimentary status of the genital system. The percentage of infantilism in the population is positively related to the density of the snail population in the winter, and is negatively related to the humidity of weather in the spring. A natural control mechanism ofT. pisana populations is proposed: (a) in a dense population of young snails infantilism prevents most of them from becoming parents and an over-sized population the following year; (b) in a humid spring a fall in the rate of infantilism enlarges the population size, thus compensating for reduced egg-laying in winter.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 2
    ISSN: 1432-1254
    Keywords: Aerobiology ; Airborne algae ; Outdoor air ; Altitude ; Weather
    Source: Springer Online Journal Archives 1860-2000
    Topics: Geography , Physics
    Notes: Abstract Sixteen species of algae were collected from 73.8 m3 of air. Eleven were obtained in Minatitlán and eleven in México City. The data show that similar diversity occurred between the two localities, in spite of the difference in altitude. This suggests that cosmopolitan airborne microorganisms might have been released from different sources. Three major algal divisions (Chlorophyta, Cyanophyta and Chrysophyta) formed the airborne algal group. Also, a large concentration of 2220 algae m−3 was found near sea-level, while lower amounts were recorded at the high altitude of México City. The generaScenedesmus, Chlorella andChlorococcum dominated. Striking relationships were noted between the concentration of airborne green and blue-green algae, and meteorological conditions such as rain, vapour pressure, temperature and winds for different altitudes. In Minatitlán a linear relationship was established between concentration of algae and both vapour pressure (mbar) and temperature (° C), while in México City the wind (m s−1) was associated with variations in the algal count.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 3
    Electronic Resource
    Electronic Resource
    Springer
    ISSN: 1432-1254
    Keywords: Weather ; Weather front ; Myocardial infarction ; Meteoropathology ; Biometerological methods
    Source: Springer Online Journal Archives 1860-2000
    Topics: Geography , Physics
    Notes: Abstract Some methodological aspects are discussed of the investigation of acute infarct myocarditis (AIM) in relation to weather fronts. Results of a new method of analysis are given. Data were analysed from about the hour of the onset of symptoms, and led to the diagnosis of AIM either immediately or within a few hours or days (3019 cases observed over 4.5 years during 1982–1986 in Plzen, Czechoslovakia). Weather classification was based on three factors (the type of the foregoing front, the type of the subsequent front, the time section of the time interval demarcated by the passage of the surfaces of the fronts). AIM occurrence increased in particular types of weather fronts: (i) by 30% during 7–12 h after a warm front, if the time span between fronts exceeded 24 h; (ii) by 10% in time at least 36 h distant from the foregoing cold or occlusion front and from the succeeding warm or occlusion front; (iii) by 20% during 0–2 h before the passage of the front, provided the foregoing front was not warm and the interval between fronts exceeded 5 h. AIM occurrence decreased by 15%–20% for time span between fronts 〉 24 h at times 6–11, 6–23 and 6–35 h before a coming warm or occlusion front (for interfrontal intervals 25–48, 49–72 and possibly 〉 72 h), and also at 12–23 and possibly 12–35 h before a cold front (for intervals 49–72 and possibly 〉 72 h), if the foregoing front was cold or an occlusion front.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 4
    ISSN: 1432-1254
    Keywords: Erythrocyte sedimentation rates ; Blood ; Weather fronts ; Weather ; Sun spots
    Source: Springer Online Journal Archives 1860-2000
    Topics: Geography , Physics
    Notes: Abstract S.W. Tromp made investigations of a weather effect on erythrocyte sedimentation rates (ESR) of human blood by routine checks of the blood of donor groups in Leiden from 1955 to 1985. A higher ESR was found for the summer season and lower ESR for winter and low values occurred soon after a strong cooling spell. In this report, we have continued his work using data for the years 1971–1985 from Leiden (The Netherlands). An influence of the weather on ESR was also found, but this seems to be more complicated than Tromp supposed. Some new aspects are described and elaborated, e.g. ESR already increases before warming is noticed at the ground layer. This is possibly caused by changes in the upper atmosphere, a suggestion that requires further studies. For periods of low ESR, there was a greater number of occlusion fronts passing the Netherlands. The long-term fluctuations of ESR that were found were correlated with sun spot relative numbers only in a few periods. The results of our study justify further research for a variety of other locations around the world.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 5
    Electronic Resource
    Electronic Resource
    Springer
    International journal of biometeorology 38 (1995), S. 152-155 
    ISSN: 1432-1254
    Keywords: Childbirth ; Weather ; Cold front ; Barometric pressure ; Parturition
    Source: Springer Online Journal Archives 1860-2000
    Topics: Geography , Physics
    Notes: Abstract Previous attempts to find relationships between weather and parturition (childbirth) and its onset (the beginning of labor pains) have revealed, firstly, limited but statistically significant relationships between weather conditions much colder than the day before, with high winds and low pressure, and increased onsets; and secondly, increased numbers of childbirths during periods of atmospheric pressure rise (highly statistically significant). To test these findings, this study examined weather data coincident childbirth data from a hospital at Bryan-College Station, Texas (for a period of 30 cool months from 1987 to 1992). Tests for (1) days of cold fronts, (2) a day before and a day after the cold front, (3) days with large temperature increases, and (4) decreases from the day before revealed no relationship with mean daily rate of onset. Cold days with high winds and low pressure had significantly fewer onsets, a result that is the opposite of previous findings. The postulated relationship between periods of pressure rise and increased birth frequency was negative, i.e., significantly fewer births occurred at those times — again, the opposite of the apparent occurrence in an earlier study. The coincidence of diurnal variations in both atmospheric pressure and frequency of childbirths, was shown to account for fairly strong negative associations between the two variables. This same reasoning might explain the positive association found in an earlier study. A comparison has been made between childbirth and onset as the response variable, and the advantage is emphasized of using data from women whose labor is not induced.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 6
    ISSN: 1432-1254
    Keywords: Psychology ; Weather ; Mood ; Emotional crisis frequency ; Productivity ; Temperate climate
    Source: Springer Online Journal Archives 1860-2000
    Topics: Geography , Physics
    Notes: Abstract A group of 62 mostly university student subjects kept structured diaries of their feelings and their productivity for six weeks in Illinois in early autumn. During the same period, daily frequency of telephone calls to a crisis intervention service in the same community was monitored, and complete daily weather data for the vicinity were provided by a local meteorological research facility. Major findings are as follows. The weather appears to influence mood and productivity, but only to a smallextent compared with the aggregate of all other controlling factors. Males show a relatively stronger effect than females. Psychologically troubled people generally appear to be more affected by weather than university students. The students and the crisis intervention service clients with “mild” problems tend to be stressed more when the weather is unstable, cloudy, warm and humid, and least stressed during sunny, dry, cool weather with rising barometric pressure. The crisis service clients with “severe” problems react oppositely to these two weather types. The meaning of these and other results and the strengths and weaknesses of this study's design are discussed.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 7
    ISSN: 1432-1254
    Keywords: Depression ; Weather ; Winter ; Cold
    Source: Springer Online Journal Archives 1860-2000
    Topics: Geography , Physics
    Notes: Abstract To examine whether harsh winter weather is associated with depressive symptoms, 45 healthy subjects from Minnesota were compared to 42 subjects from California near the end of the winter season. No differences in the prevalence of depressive symptoms were found between the two groups.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 8
    Electronic Resource
    Electronic Resource
    Springer
    International journal of biometeorology 40 (1997), S. 192-199 
    ISSN: 1432-1254
    Keywords: Key words Rheumatoid arthritis ; Osteoarthritis ; Weather ; Cold sensitivity ; Sensitivity to humidity
    Source: Springer Online Journal Archives 1860-2000
    Topics: Geography , Physics
    Notes: Abstract  Despite the pervasiveness of the idea that arthritis is influenced by the weather, scientific evidence on the matter is sparse and non-conclusive. This study, conducted in the Australian inland city of Bendigo, sought to establish a possible relationship between the pain and rigidity of arthritis and the weather variables of temperature, relative humidity, barometric pressure, wind speed and precipitation. Pain and rigidity levels were scored by 25 participants with osteoarthritis and/or rheumatoid arthritis four times per day for 1 month from each season. Mean pain and rigidity scores for each time of each day were found to be correlated with the meteorological data. Correlations between mean symptoms and temperature and relative humidity were significant (P 〈0.001). Time of day was included in the analysis. Stepwise multiple regression analysis indicated that meteorological variables and time of day accounted for 38% of the variance in mean pain and 20% of the variance in mean rigidity when data of all months were considered. A post-study telephone questionnaire indicated 92% of participants perceived their symptoms to be influenced by the weather, while 48% claimed to be able to predict the weather according to their symptoms. Hence, the results suggest (1) decreased temperature is associated with both increased pain and increased rigidity and (2) increased relative himidity is associated with increased pain and rigidity in arthritis sufferers.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
Close ⊗
This website uses cookies and the analysis tool Matomo. More information can be found here...