ALBERT

All Library Books, journals and Electronic Records Telegrafenberg

Your email was sent successfully. Check your inbox.

An error occurred while sending the email. Please try again.

Proceed reservation?

Export
Filter
  • Signal Transduction  (1,508)
  • American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS)  (1,508)
  • American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
Collection
Keywords
Publisher
Years
  • 1
    facet.materialart.
    Unknown
    American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS)
    In: Science
    Publication Date: 2017-03-25
    Description: Author: L. Bryan Ray
    Keywords: Signal Transduction
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Geosciences , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 2
    facet.materialart.
    Unknown
    American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS)
    Publication Date: 2016-04-29
    Description: Metastatic disease is the leading cause of cancer-related deaths and involves critical interactions between tumor cells and the microenvironment. Hypoxia is a potent microenvironmental factor promoting metastatic progression. Clinically, hypoxia and the expression of the hypoxia-inducible transcription factors HIF-1 and HIF-2 are associated with increased distant metastasis and poor survival in a variety of tumor types. Moreover, HIF signaling in malignant cells influences multiple steps within the metastatic cascade. Here we review research focused on elucidating the mechanisms by which the hypoxic tumor microenvironment promotes metastatic progression. These studies have identified potential biomarkers and therapeutic targets regulated by hypoxia that could be incorporated into strategies aimed at preventing and treating metastatic disease.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Rankin, Erinn B -- Giaccia, Amato J -- CA-197713/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- CA-198291/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- CA-67166/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2016 Apr 8;352(6282):175-80. doi: 10.1126/science.aaf4405. Epub 2016 Apr 7.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Division of Radiation and Cancer Biology, Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University Medical Center, Stanford, CA 94305-5152, USA. Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Stanford University Medical Center, Stanford, CA 94305-5152, USA. ; Division of Radiation and Cancer Biology, Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University Medical Center, Stanford, CA 94305-5152, USA. giaccia@stanford.edu.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27124451" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Basic Helix-Loop-Helix Transcription Factors/*metabolism ; Biomarkers, Tumor/analysis/metabolism ; Cell Hypoxia ; Cell Movement ; Disease Progression ; Drug Resistance, Neoplasm ; Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition ; Humans ; Hypoxia-Inducible Factor 1, alpha Subunit/*metabolism ; Neoplasm Invasiveness ; Neoplasm Metastasis/*pathology/*therapy ; Radiation Tolerance ; Signal Transduction ; *Tumor Microenvironment
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 3
    Publication Date: 2016-02-06
    Description: SH3 and multiple ankyrin repeat domains 3 (SHANK3) haploinsufficiency is causative for the neurological features of Phelan-McDermid syndrome (PMDS), including a high risk of autism spectrum disorder (ASD). We used unbiased, quantitative proteomics to identify changes in the phosphoproteome of Shank3-deficient neurons. Down-regulation of protein kinase B (PKB/Akt)-mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) signaling resulted from enhanced phosphorylation and activation of serine/threonine protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) regulatory subunit, B56beta, due to increased steady-state levels of its kinase, Cdc2-like kinase 2 (CLK2). Pharmacological and genetic activation of Akt or inhibition of CLK2 relieved synaptic deficits in Shank3-deficient and PMDS patient-derived neurons. CLK2 inhibition also restored normal sociability in a Shank3-deficient mouse model. Our study thereby provides a novel mechanistic and potentially therapeutic understanding of deregulated signaling downstream of Shank3 deficiency.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Bidinosti, Michael -- Botta, Paolo -- Kruttner, Sebastian -- Proenca, Catia C -- Stoehr, Natacha -- Bernhard, Mario -- Fruh, Isabelle -- Mueller, Matthias -- Bonenfant, Debora -- Voshol, Hans -- Carbone, Walter -- Neal, Sarah J -- McTighe, Stephanie M -- Roma, Guglielmo -- Dolmetsch, Ricardo E -- Porter, Jeffrey A -- Caroni, Pico -- Bouwmeester, Tewis -- Luthi, Andreas -- Galimberti, Ivan -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2016 Mar 11;351(6278):1199-203. doi: 10.1126/science.aad5487. Epub 2016 Feb 4.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Developmental Molecular Pathways, Novartis Institutes for Biomedical Research, Basel, Switzerland. ; Friedrich Miescher Institute, Basel, Switzerland. ; Analytical Sciences and Imaging, Novartis Institutes for Biomedical Research, Basel, Switzerland. ; Neuroscience, Novartis Institutes for Biomedical Research, Cambridge, USA. ; Developmental Molecular Pathways, Novartis Institutes for Biomedical Research, Basel, Switzerland. ivan.galimberti@novartis.com.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26847545" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Amino Acid Sequence ; Animals ; Autism Spectrum Disorder/*drug therapy/enzymology/genetics ; Chromosome Deletion ; Chromosome Disorders/genetics ; Chromosomes, Human, Pair 22/genetics ; Disease Models, Animal ; Down-Regulation ; Gene Knockdown Techniques ; Humans ; Insulin-Like Growth Factor I/metabolism ; Mice ; Molecular Sequence Data ; Multiprotein Complexes/metabolism ; Nerve Tissue Proteins/*genetics ; Neurons/enzymology ; Phosphorylation ; Protein Phosphatase 2/metabolism ; Protein-Serine-Threonine Kinases/*antagonists & inhibitors/metabolism ; Protein-Tyrosine Kinases/*antagonists & inhibitors/metabolism ; Proteomics ; Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-akt/genetics/metabolism ; Rats ; Signal Transduction ; TOR Serine-Threonine Kinases/metabolism
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 4
    Publication Date: 2016-03-12
    Description: The oncogene MDMX is overexpressed in many cancers, leading to suppression of the tumor suppressor p53. Inhibitors of the oncogene product MDMX therefore might help reactivate p53 and enhance the efficacy of DNA-damaging drugs. However, we currently lack a quantitative understanding of how MDMX inhibition affects the p53 signaling pathway and cell sensitivity to DNA damage. Live cell imaging showed that MDMX depletion triggered two distinct phases of p53 accumulation in single cells: an initial postmitotic pulse, followed by low-amplitude oscillations. The response to DNA damage was sharply different in these two phases; in the first phase, MDMX depletion was synergistic with DNA damage in causing cell death, whereas in the second phase, depletion of MDMX inhibited cell death. Thus a quantitative understanding of signal dynamics and cellular states is important for designing an optimal schedule of dual-drug administration.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Chen, Sheng-Hong -- Forrester, William -- Lahav, Galit -- F32GM105205/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- GM083303/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- R01 GM083303/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2016 Mar 11;351(6278):1204-8. doi: 10.1126/science.aac5610. Epub 2016 Mar 10.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Systems Biology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA. ; Developmental and Molecular Pathways, Novartis Institutes for Biomedical Research, Cambridge, MA, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26965628" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Antineoplastic Agents/*administration & dosage ; Apoptosis ; *DNA Damage ; Gene Knockdown Techniques ; Humans ; MCF-7 Cells ; Molecular Imaging ; Neoplasms/*drug therapy ; Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-mdm2/*antagonists & inhibitors/genetics ; RNA, Small Interfering/genetics ; Signal Transduction ; Time Factors ; Tumor Suppressor Protein p53/*metabolism
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 5
    Publication Date: 2016-02-26
    Description: Astrocytes are specialized and heterogeneous cells that contribute to central nervous system function and homeostasis. However, the mechanisms that create and maintain differences among astrocytes and allow them to fulfill particular physiological roles remain poorly defined. We reveal that neurons actively determine the features of astrocytes in the healthy adult brain and define a role for neuron-derived sonic hedgehog (Shh) in regulating the molecular and functional profile of astrocytes. Thus, the molecular and physiological program of astrocytes is not hardwired during development but, rather, depends on cues from neurons that drive and sustain their specialized properties.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Farmer, W Todd -- Abrahamsson, Therese -- Chierzi, Sabrina -- Lui, Christopher -- Zaelzer, Cristian -- Jones, Emma V -- Bally, Blandine Ponroy -- Chen, Gary G -- Theroux, Jean-Francois -- Peng, Jimmy -- Bourque, Charles W -- Charron, Frederic -- Ernst, Carl -- Sjostrom, P Jesper -- Murai, Keith K -- FDN 143337/Canadian Institutes of Health Research/Canada -- MOP 111152/Canadian Institutes of Health Research/Canada -- MOP 123390/Canadian Institutes of Health Research/Canada -- MOP 126137/Canadian Institutes of Health Research/Canada -- NIA 288936/Canadian Institutes of Health Research/Canada -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2016 Feb 19;351(6275):849-54. doi: 10.1126/science.aab3103.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Centre for Research in Neuroscience, Department of Neurology and Neurosurgery, Brain Repair and Integrative Neuroscience Program, The Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre, Montreal General Hospital, Montreal, Quebec, Canada. ; Department of Psychiatry, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada. McGill Group for Suicide Studies, Douglas Hospital, Montreal, Quebec, Canada. ; Molecular Biology of Neural Development, Institut de Recherches Cliniques de Montreal, Department of Medicine, University of Montreal, Montreal, Quebec, Canada. Department of Biology, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada. ; Department of Psychiatry, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada. McGill Group for Suicide Studies, Douglas Hospital, Montreal, Quebec, Canada. Department of Human Genetics, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada. Douglas Hospital Research Institute, Verdun, Quebec, Canada. ; Centre for Research in Neuroscience, Department of Neurology and Neurosurgery, Brain Repair and Integrative Neuroscience Program, The Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre, Montreal General Hospital, Montreal, Quebec, Canada. keith.murai@mcgill.ca.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26912893" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Astrocytes/*metabolism ; Cerebellar Cortex/*cytology ; Female ; Gene Deletion ; Hedgehog Proteins/genetics/*metabolism ; Male ; Mice ; Mice, Mutant Strains ; Neurons/*metabolism ; Receptors, G-Protein-Coupled/genetics/*metabolism ; Signal Transduction
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 6
    Publication Date: 2016-02-26
    Description: Purine biosynthetic enzymes organize into dynamic cellular bodies called purinosomes. Little is known about the spatiotemporal control of these structures. Using super-resolution microscopy, we demonstrated that purinosomes colocalized with mitochondria, and these results were supported by isolation of purinosome enzymes with mitochondria. Moreover, the number of purinosome-containing cells responded to dysregulation of mitochondrial function and metabolism. To explore the role of intracellular signaling, we performed a kinome screen using a label-free assay and found that mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) influenced purinosome assembly. mTOR inhibition reduced purinosome-mitochondria colocalization and suppressed purinosome formation stimulated by mitochondria dysregulation. Collectively, our data suggest an mTOR-mediated link between purinosomes and mitochondria, and a general means by which mTOR regulates nucleotide metabolism by spatiotemporal control over protein association.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉French, Jarrod B -- Jones, Sara A -- Deng, Huayun -- Pedley, Anthony M -- Kim, Doory -- Chan, Chung Yu -- Hu, Haibei -- Pugh, Raymond J -- Zhao, Hong -- Zhang, Youxin -- Huang, Tony Jun -- Fang, Ye -- Zhuang, Xiaowei -- Benkovic, Stephen J -- 1R33EB019785-01/EB/NIBIB NIH HHS/ -- GM024129/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- Canadian Institutes of Health Research/Canada -- Howard Hughes Medical Institute/ -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2016 Feb 12;351(6274):733-7. doi: 10.1126/science.aac6054.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Department of Chemistry, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794, USA. jarrod.french@stonybrook.edu fangy2@corning.com zhuang@chemistry.harvard.edu sjb1@psu.edu. ; Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA. ; Biochemical Technologies, Science and Technology Division, Corning Incorporated, Corning, NY 14831, USA. ; Department of Chemistry, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802, USA. ; Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA. Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA. ; Department of Engineering Science and Mechanics, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802, USA. ; Biochemical Technologies, Science and Technology Division, Corning Incorporated, Corning, NY 14831, USA. jarrod.french@stonybrook.edu fangy2@corning.com zhuang@chemistry.harvard.edu sjb1@psu.edu. ; Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA. Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA. Department of Physics, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA. jarrod.french@stonybrook.edu fangy2@corning.com zhuang@chemistry.harvard.edu sjb1@psu.edu. ; Department of Chemistry, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802, USA. jarrod.french@stonybrook.edu fangy2@corning.com zhuang@chemistry.harvard.edu sjb1@psu.edu.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26912862" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: HeLa Cells ; Humans ; Microscopy ; Mitochondria/*metabolism/ultrastructure ; Purines/*metabolism ; Signal Transduction ; TOR Serine-Threonine Kinases/*metabolism
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 7
    Publication Date: 2016-02-06
    Description: The intestinal epithelium forms an essential barrier between a host and its microbiota. Protozoa and helminths are members of the gut microbiota of mammals, including humans, yet the many ways that gut epithelial cells orchestrate responses to these eukaryotes remain unclear. Here we show that tuft cells, which are taste-chemosensory epithelial cells, accumulate during parasite colonization and infection. Disruption of chemosensory signaling through the loss of TRMP5 abrogates the expansion of tuft cells, goblet cells, eosinophils, and type 2 innate lymphoid cells during parasite colonization. Tuft cells are the primary source of the parasite-induced cytokine interleukin-25, which indirectly induces tuft cell expansion by promoting interleukin-13 production by innate lymphoid cells. Our results identify intestinal tuft cells as critical sentinels in the gut epithelium that promote type 2 immunity in response to intestinal parasites.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Howitt, Michael R -- Lavoie, Sydney -- Michaud, Monia -- Blum, Arthur M -- Tran, Sara V -- Weinstock, Joel V -- Gallini, Carey Ann -- Redding, Kevin -- Margolskee, Robert F -- Osborne, Lisa C -- Artis, David -- Garrett, Wendy S -- F31DK105653/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- F32DK098826/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- R01 CA154426/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01 GM099531/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2016 Mar 18;351(6279):1329-33. doi: 10.1126/science.aaf1648. Epub 2016 Feb 4.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Departments of Immunology and Infectious Diseases and Genetics and Complex Diseases, Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA 02115, USA. ; Division of Gastroenterology, Tufts Medical Center, Boston, MA 02111, USA. ; Monell Chemical Senses Center, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA. ; Jill Roberts Institute for Research in Inflammatory Bowel Disease, Weill Cornell Medical College, Cornell University, New York, NY 10021, USA. ; Departments of Immunology and Infectious Diseases and Genetics and Complex Diseases, Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA 02115, USA. Broad Institute of Harvard and Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02142, USA. Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA 02215, USA. wgarrett@hsph.harvard.edu.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26847546" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Chemoreceptor Cells/*immunology ; Eosinophils/immunology ; Goblet Cells/immunology ; Helminthiasis/immunology/parasitology ; Helminths/immunology ; Immunity, Mucosal ; Interleukin-13/immunology ; Interleukin-17/immunology ; Intestinal Diseases, Parasitic/*immunology/parasitology ; Intestinal Mucosa/*immunology/*parasitology ; Mice ; Mice, Inbred C57BL ; Mice, Mutant Strains ; Microbiota/*immunology ; Protein-Serine-Threonine Kinases/immunology ; Protozoan Infections/immunology/parasitology ; Signal Transduction ; TRPM Cation Channels/*immunology ; Taste ; Transducin/genetics/immunology ; Tritrichomonas/immunology
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 8
    Publication Date: 2016-04-09
    Description: Activation of various cell surface receptors triggers the reorganization of downstream signaling molecules into micrometer- or submicrometer-sized clusters. However, the functional consequences of such clustering have been unclear. We biochemically reconstituted a 12-component signaling pathway on model membranes, beginning with T cell receptor (TCR) activation and ending with actin assembly. When TCR phosphorylation was triggered, downstream signaling proteins spontaneously separated into liquid-like clusters that promoted signaling outputs both in vitro and in human Jurkat T cells. Reconstituted clusters were enriched in kinases but excluded phosphatases and enhanced actin filament assembly by recruiting and organizing actin regulators. These results demonstrate that protein phase separation can create a distinct physical and biochemical compartment that facilitates signaling.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Su, Xiaolei -- Ditlev, Jonathon A -- Hui, Enfu -- Xing, Wenmin -- Banjade, Sudeep -- Okrut, Julia -- King, David S -- Taunton, Jack -- Rosen, Michael K -- Vale, Ronald D -- 5-F32-DK101188/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- F32 DK101188/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- R01 GM056322/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- R01-GM56322/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- Howard Hughes Medical Institute/ -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2016 Apr 29;352(6285):595-9. doi: 10.1126/science.aad9964. Epub 2016 Apr 7.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) Summer Institute, Marine Biological Laboratory, Woods Hole, MA 02543, USA. Department of Cellular and Molecular Pharmacology and Howard Hughes Medical Institute, University of California, San Francisco, CA 94158, USA. ; Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) Summer Institute, Marine Biological Laboratory, Woods Hole, MA 02543, USA. Department of Biophysics and Howard Hughes Medical Institute, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX 75390, USA. ; HHMI Mass Spectrometry Laboratory and Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA. ; Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) Summer Institute, Marine Biological Laboratory, Woods Hole, MA 02543, USA. Department of Biophysics and Howard Hughes Medical Institute, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX 75390, USA. ron.vale@ucsf.edu michael.rosen@utsouthwestern.edu. ; Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) Summer Institute, Marine Biological Laboratory, Woods Hole, MA 02543, USA. Department of Cellular and Molecular Pharmacology and Howard Hughes Medical Institute, University of California, San Francisco, CA 94158, USA. ron.vale@ucsf.edu michael.rosen@utsouthwestern.edu.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27056844" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Actins/*metabolism ; Adaptor Proteins, Signal Transducing/*metabolism ; Fluorescence Recovery After Photobleaching ; Humans ; Jurkat Cells ; Membrane Proteins/*metabolism ; Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Kinases ; Phosphorylation ; Polymerization ; Receptors, Antigen, T-Cell/*agonists ; Signal Transduction ; T-Lymphocytes/*metabolism
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 9
    Publication Date: 2016-03-19
    Description: Systemic inflammation, which results from the massive release of proinflammatory molecules into the circulatory system, is a major risk factor for severe illness, but the precise mechanisms underlying its control are not fully understood. We observed that prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), through its receptor EP4, is down-regulated in human systemic inflammatory disease. Mice with reduced PGE2 synthesis develop systemic inflammation, associated with translocation of gut bacteria, which can be prevented by treatment with EP4 agonists. Mechanistically, we demonstrate that PGE2-EP4 signaling acts directly on type 3 innate lymphoid cells (ILCs), promoting their homeostasis and driving them to produce interleukin-22 (IL-22). Disruption of the ILC-IL-22 axis impairs PGE2-mediated inhibition of systemic inflammation. Hence, the ILC-IL-22 axis is essential in protecting against gut barrier dysfunction, enabling PGE2-EP4 signaling to impede systemic inflammation.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4841390/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4841390/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Duffin, Rodger -- O'Connor, Richard A -- Crittenden, Siobhan -- Forster, Thorsten -- Yu, Cunjing -- Zheng, Xiaozhong -- Smyth, Danielle -- Robb, Calum T -- Rossi, Fiona -- Skouras, Christos -- Tang, Shaohui -- Richards, James -- Pellicoro, Antonella -- Weller, Richard B -- Breyer, Richard M -- Mole, Damian J -- Iredale, John P -- Anderton, Stephen M -- Narumiya, Shuh -- Maizels, Rick M -- Ghazal, Peter -- Howie, Sarah E -- Rossi, Adriano G -- Yao, Chengcan -- 106122/Wellcome Trust/United Kingdom -- BB/K091121/1/Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council/United Kingdom -- DK37097/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- Medical Research Council/United Kingdom -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2016 Mar 18;351(6279):1333-8. doi: 10.1126/science.aad9903.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Medical Research Council (MRC) Centre for Inflammation Research, Queen's Medical Research Institute, The University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh EH16 4TJ, UK. ; Division of Pathway Medicine, Edinburgh Infectious Diseases, The University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh EH16 4SB, UK. ; Institute for Immunology and Infection Research, The University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh EH9 3JT, UK. ; MRC Centre for Regenerative Medicine, The University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh EH16 4UU, UK. ; Department of Gastroenterology, First Affiliated Hospital of Jinan University, Guangzhou 510630, China. ; Department of Veterans Affairs, Tennessee Valley Health Authority, Nashville, TN 37212, USA. Department of Medicine, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN 37232, USA. ; Center for Innovation in Immunoregulative Technology and Therapeutics (AK Project), Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto 606-8501, Japan. Core Research for Evolutional Science and Technology (CREST), Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST), Tokyo 102-0075, Japan. ; Division of Pathway Medicine, Edinburgh Infectious Diseases, The University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh EH16 4SB, UK. Centre for Synthetic and Systems Biology (SynthSys), The University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh EH9 3JD, UK. ; Medical Research Council (MRC) Centre for Inflammation Research, Queen's Medical Research Institute, The University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh EH16 4TJ, UK. chengcan.yao@ed.ac.uk.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26989254" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Bacterial Infections/genetics/immunology ; Dinoprostone/*immunology ; Gene Expression ; Humans ; Immunity, Innate ; Inflammation/drug therapy/*immunology/microbiology ; Interleukins/*immunology ; Intestines/*immunology/microbiology ; Lymphocytes/*immunology ; Mice ; Receptors, Prostaglandin E, EP4 Subtype/antagonists & ; inhibitors/genetics/*immunology ; Signal Transduction
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 10
    Publication Date: 2016-01-23
    Description: Oligodendrocytes myelinate axons in the central nervous system and develop from oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs) that must first migrate extensively during brain and spinal cord development. We show that OPCs require the vasculature as a physical substrate for migration. We observed that OPCs of the embryonic mouse brain and spinal cord, as well as the human cortex, emerge from progenitor domains and associate with the abluminal endothelial surface of nearby blood vessels. Migrating OPCs crawl along and jump between vessels. OPC migration in vivo was disrupted in mice with defective vascular architecture but was normal in mice lacking pericytes. Thus, physical interactions with the vascular endothelium are required for OPC migration. We identify Wnt-Cxcr4 (chemokine receptor 4) signaling in regulation of OPC-endothelial interactions and propose that this signaling coordinates OPC migration with differentiation.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Tsai, Hui-Hsin -- Niu, Jianqin -- Munji, Roeben -- Davalos, Dimitrios -- Chang, Junlei -- Zhang, Haijing -- Tien, An-Chi -- Kuo, Calvin J -- Chan, Jonah R -- Daneman, Richard -- Fancy, Stephen P J -- 1P01 NS083513/NS/NINDS NIH HHS/ -- 1R01NS064517/NS/NINDS NIH HHS/ -- Howard Hughes Medical Institute/ -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2016 Jan 22;351(6271):379-84. doi: 10.1126/science.aad3839.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Pediatrics, University of California at San Francisco (UCSF), San Francisco, CA 94158, USA. ; Departments of Pharmacology and Neuroscience, University of California at San Diego (UCSD), San Diego, CA 92093, USA. ; Department of Neurosciences, Lerner Research Institute, Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, OH 44195, USA. ; Division of Hematology, Department of Medicine, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA. ; Division of Hematology, Department of Medicine, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA. Department of Urology, Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, OH 44195, USA. Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI), Chevy Chase, MD 20815, USA. Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, NC 27710, USA. ; Department of Neurology, UCSF, San Francisco, CA 94158, USA. ; Department of Pediatrics, University of California at San Francisco (UCSF), San Francisco, CA 94158, USA. Department of Neurology, UCSF, San Francisco, CA 94158, USA. Division of Neonatology, UCSF, San Francisco, CA 94158, USA. Newborn Brain Research Institute, UCSF, San Francisco, CA 94158, USA. stephen.fancy@ucsf.edu.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26798014" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Blood Vessels/cytology/embryology ; *Cell Movement ; Cerebral Cortex/blood supply/*embryology ; Endothelium, Vascular/cytology ; Humans ; Mice ; Neural Stem Cells/cytology/*physiology ; *Neurogenesis ; Oligodendroglia/cytology/*physiology ; *Organogenesis ; Pericytes/cytology/physiology ; Receptors, CXCR4/metabolism ; Signal Transduction ; Spinal Cord/blood supply/cytology/*embryology ; Wnt Proteins/metabolism
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 11
    Publication Date: 2016-01-23
    Description: The plant root cap, surrounding the very tip of the growing root, perceives and transmits environmental signals to the inner root tissues. In Arabidopsis thaliana, auxin released by the root cap contributes to the regular spacing of lateral organs along the primary root axis. Here, we show that the periodicity of lateral organ induction is driven by recurrent programmed cell death at the most distal edge of the root cap. We suggest that synchronous bursts of cell death in lateral root cap cells release pulses of auxin to surrounding root tissues, establishing the pattern for lateral root formation. The dynamics of root cap turnover may therefore coordinate primary root growth with root branching in order to optimize the uptake of water and nutrients from the soil.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Xuan, Wei -- Band, Leah R -- Kumpf, Robert P -- Van Damme, Daniel -- Parizot, Boris -- De Rop, Gieljan -- Opdenacker, Davy -- Moller, Barbara K -- Skorzinski, Noemi -- Njo, Maria F -- De Rybel, Bert -- Audenaert, Dominique -- Nowack, Moritz K -- Vanneste, Steffen -- Beeckman, Tom -- Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council/United Kingdom -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2016 Jan 22;351(6271):384-7. doi: 10.1126/science.aad2776.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Plant Systems Biology, Vlaams Instituut voor Biotechnologie (VIB), Technologiepark 927, 9052 Ghent, Belgium. Department of Plant Biotechnology and Bioinformatics, Gent University, Technologiepark 927, 9052 Ghent, Belgium. State Key Laboratory of Crop Genetics and Germplasm Enhancement and MOA Key Laboratory of Plant Nutrition and Fertilization in Lower-Middle Reaches of the Yangtze River, Nanjing Agricultural University, Weigang No. 1, Nanjing 210095, PR China. ; Centre for Plant Integrative Biology, University of Nottingham, Nottingham LE12 5RD, UK. ; Department of Plant Systems Biology, Vlaams Instituut voor Biotechnologie (VIB), Technologiepark 927, 9052 Ghent, Belgium. Department of Plant Biotechnology and Bioinformatics, Gent University, Technologiepark 927, 9052 Ghent, Belgium. ; Max Planck Institute for Developmental Biology, Spemannstrasse 35, 72076 Tubingen, Germany. ; Department of Plant Systems Biology, Vlaams Instituut voor Biotechnologie (VIB), Technologiepark 927, 9052 Ghent, Belgium. Department of Plant Biotechnology and Bioinformatics, Gent University, Technologiepark 927, 9052 Ghent, Belgium. Laboratory of Biochemistry, Wageningen University, Dreijenlaan 3, 6703HA Wageningen, Netherlands. ; Department of Plant Systems Biology, Vlaams Instituut voor Biotechnologie (VIB), Technologiepark 927, 9052 Ghent, Belgium. Department of Plant Biotechnology and Bioinformatics, Gent University, Technologiepark 927, 9052 Ghent, Belgium. tobee@psb.vib-ugent.be.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26798015" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: *Apoptosis ; Arabidopsis/cytology/*growth & development/metabolism ; Indoleacetic Acids/*metabolism ; Plant Epidermis/cytology/growth & development/metabolism ; Plant Root Cap/cytology/*growth & development/metabolism ; Receptors, TNF-Related Apoptosis-Inducing Ligand/genetics/metabolism ; Signal Transduction ; Soil ; Water/metabolism
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 12
    facet.materialart.
    Unknown
    American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS)
    In: Science
    Publication Date: 2016-05-20
    Description: Author: L. Bryan Ray
    Keywords: Signal Transduction
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Geosciences , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 13
    facet.materialart.
    Unknown
    American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS)
    In: Science
    Publication Date: 2016-09-03
    Description: Author: L. Bryan Ray
    Keywords: Signal Transduction
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Geosciences , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 14
    facet.materialart.
    Unknown
    American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS)
    In: Science
    Publication Date: 2016-04-29
    Description: Author: L. Bryan Ray
    Keywords: Signal Transduction
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Geosciences , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 15
    facet.materialart.
    Unknown
    American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS)
    In: Science
    Publication Date: 2016-10-14
    Description: Reversible protein phosphorylation plays a fundamental role in signal transduction networks. Phosphorylation alters protein function by regulating enzymatic activity, stability, cellular localization, or binding partners. Over three-quarters of human proteins may be phosphorylated, with many targeted at multiple sites. Such multisite phosphorylation substantially increases the scope for modulating protein function—a protein with n phosphorylation sites has the potential to exist in 2n distinct phosphorylation states, each of which could, in theory, display modified functionality. Proteins can be substrates for several protein kinases, thereby integrating distinct signals to provide a coherent biological response. However, they can also be phosphorylated at multiple sites by a single protein kinase to promote a specific functional output that can be reversed by dephosphorylation by protein phosphatases. On page 233 of this issue, Mylona et al. (1) reveal an unexpected role for multisite phosphorylation, whereby a protein kinase progressively phosphorylates sites on a transcription factor to promote and then subsequently limit its activity independently of dephosphorylation. Authors: Alan J. Whitmarsh, Roger J. Davis
    Keywords: Signal Transduction
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Geosciences , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 16
    facet.materialart.
    Unknown
    American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS)
    In: Science
    Publication Date: 2016-10-14
    Description: Authors: Caroline Ash, L. Bryan Ray
    Keywords: Signal Transduction
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Geosciences , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 17
    facet.materialart.
    Unknown
    American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS)
    In: Science
    Publication Date: 2016-08-16
    Description: Author: L. Bryan Ray
    Keywords: Signal Transduction
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Geosciences , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 18
    Publication Date: 2015-01-31
    Description: The mechanistic basis of eukaryotic circadian oscillators in model systems as diverse as Neurospora, Drosophila, and mammalian cells is thought to be a transcription-and-translation-based negative feedback loop, wherein progressive and controlled phosphorylation of one or more negative elements ultimately elicits their own proteasome-mediated degradation, thereby releasing negative feedback and determining circadian period length. The Neurospora crassa circadian negative element FREQUENCY (FRQ) exemplifies such proteins; it is progressively phosphorylated at more than 100 sites, and strains bearing alleles of frq with anomalous phosphorylation display abnormal stability of FRQ that is well correlated with altered periods or apparent arrhythmicity. Unexpectedly, we unveiled normal circadian oscillations that reflect the allelic state of frq but that persist in the absence of typical degradation of FRQ. This manifest uncoupling of negative element turnover from circadian period length determination is not consistent with the consensus eukaryotic circadian model.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4432837/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4432837/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Larrondo, Luis F -- Olivares-Yanez, Consuelo -- Baker, Christopher L -- Loros, Jennifer J -- Dunlap, Jay C -- P01 GM68087/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- R01 GM034985/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- R01 GM083336/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- R01 GM34985/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2015 Jan 30;347(6221):1257277. doi: 10.1126/science.1257277.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Millennium Nucleus for Fungal Integrative and Synthetic Biology, Departamento de Genetica Molecular y Microbiologia, Facultad de Ciencias Biologicas, Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Chile, Casilla 114-D, Santiago, Chile. Department of Genetics, Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth, Hanover, NH 03755, USA. jay.c.dunlap@dartmouth.edu llarrondo@bio.puc.cl. ; Millennium Nucleus for Fungal Integrative and Synthetic Biology, Departamento de Genetica Molecular y Microbiologia, Facultad de Ciencias Biologicas, Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Chile, Casilla 114-D, Santiago, Chile. ; Department of Genetics, Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth, Hanover, NH 03755, USA. ; Department of Genetics, Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth, Hanover, NH 03755, USA. Department of Biochemistry, Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth, Hanover, NH 03755, USA. ; Department of Genetics, Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth, Hanover, NH 03755, USA. jay.c.dunlap@dartmouth.edu llarrondo@bio.puc.cl.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25635104" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Adenine/analogs & derivatives/pharmacology ; Alleles ; *Circadian Clocks ; *Circadian Rhythm ; Feedback, Physiological ; Fungal Proteins/biosynthesis/*genetics/*metabolism ; Half-Life ; Neurospora crassa/*physiology ; Phosphorylation ; Proteasome Endopeptidase Complex/metabolism ; Protein Kinase Inhibitors/pharmacology ; Protein Stability ; Proteolysis ; Signal Transduction
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 19
    Publication Date: 2015-01-03
    Description: Lysosomes are crucial cellular organelles for human health that function in digestion and recycling of extracellular and intracellular macromolecules. We describe a signaling role for lysosomes that affects aging. In the worm Caenorhabditis elegans, the lysosomal acid lipase LIPL-4 triggered nuclear translocalization of a lysosomal lipid chaperone LBP-8, which promoted longevity by activating the nuclear hormone receptors NHR-49 and NHR-80. We used high-throughput metabolomic analysis to identify several lipids in which abundance was increased in worms constitutively overexpressing LIPL-4. Among them, oleoylethanolamide directly bound to LBP-8 and NHR-80 proteins, activated transcription of target genes of NHR-49 and NHR-80, and promoted longevity in C. elegans. These findings reveal a lysosome-to-nucleus signaling pathway that promotes longevity and suggest a function of lysosomes as signaling organelles in metazoans.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4425353/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4425353/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Folick, Andrew -- Oakley, Holly D -- Yu, Yong -- Armstrong, Eric H -- Kumari, Manju -- Sanor, Lucas -- Moore, David D -- Ortlund, Eric A -- Zechner, Rudolf -- Wang, Meng C -- F30 AG046043/AG/NIA NIH HHS/ -- F30AG046043/AG/NIA NIH HHS/ -- R00 AG034988/AG/NIA NIH HHS/ -- R00AG034988/AG/NIA NIH HHS/ -- R01 AG045183/AG/NIA NIH HHS/ -- R01 DK095750/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- R01AG045183/AG/NIA NIH HHS/ -- R01DK095750/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- T32 GM008602/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- T32GM008602/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- T32HD055200/HD/NICHD NIH HHS/ -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2015 Jan 2;347(6217):83-6. doi: 10.1126/science.1258857.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Program in Developmental Biology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX 77030, USA. ; Huffington Center on Aging, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX 77030, USA. Department of Molecular and Human Genetics, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX 77030, USA. ; Department of Biochemistry, Discovery and Developmental Therapeutics, Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA 30322, USA. ; Institute of Molecular Biosciences, University of Graz, Graz, A-8010, Austria. ; Huffington Center on Aging, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX 77030, USA. ; Program in Developmental Biology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX 77030, USA. Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX 77030, USA. ; Program in Developmental Biology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX 77030, USA. Huffington Center on Aging, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX 77030, USA. Department of Molecular and Human Genetics, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX 77030, USA. wmeng@bcm.edu.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25554789" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Active Transport, Cell Nucleus ; Animals ; Caenorhabditis elegans/genetics/*physiology ; Caenorhabditis elegans Proteins/genetics/*metabolism ; Cell Nucleus/metabolism ; Lipase/metabolism ; Lipid Metabolism ; Longevity/genetics/*physiology ; Lysosomes/*metabolism ; Molecular Chaperones/genetics/*metabolism ; Receptors, Cytoplasmic and Nuclear/metabolism ; Signal Transduction
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 20
    Publication Date: 2015-03-15
    Description: Rgs2, a regulator of G proteins, lowers blood pressure by decreasing signaling through Galphaq. Human patients expressing Met-Leu-Rgs2 (ML-Rgs2) or Met-Arg-Rgs2 (MR-Rgs2) are hypertensive relative to people expressing wild-type Met-Gln-Rgs2 (MQ-Rgs2). We found that wild-type MQ-Rgs2 and its mutant, MR-Rgs2, were destroyed by the Ac/N-end rule pathway, which recognizes N(alpha)-terminally acetylated (Nt-acetylated) proteins. The shortest-lived mutant, ML-Rgs2, was targeted by both the Ac/N-end rule and Arg/N-end rule pathways. The latter pathway recognizes unacetylated N-terminal residues. Thus, the Nt-acetylated Ac-MX-Rgs2 (X = Arg, Gln, Leu) proteins are specific substrates of the mammalian Ac/N-end rule pathway. Furthermore, the Ac/N-degron of Ac-MQ-Rgs2 was conditional, and Teb4, an endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane-embedded ubiquitin ligase, was able to regulate G protein signaling by targeting Ac-MX-Rgs2 proteins for degradation through their N(alpha)-terminal acetyl group.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4748709/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4748709/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Park, Sang-Eun -- Kim, Jeong-Mok -- Seok, Ok-Hee -- Cho, Hanna -- Wadas, Brandon -- Kim, Seon-Young -- Varshavsky, Alexander -- Hwang, Cheol-Sang -- DK039520/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- GM031530/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- R01 DK039520/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- R01 GM031530/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2015 Mar 13;347(6227):1249-52. doi: 10.1126/science.aaa3844.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Life Sciences, Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang, Gyeongbuk 790-784, South Korea. ; Division of Biology and Biological Engineering, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125, USA. ; Medical Genomics Research Center, KRIBB, Daejeon, South Korea. Department of Functional Genomics, University of Science and Technology, Daejeon, South Korea. ; Division of Biology and Biological Engineering, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125, USA. cshwang@postech.ac.kr avarsh@caltech.edu. ; Department of Life Sciences, Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang, Gyeongbuk 790-784, South Korea. cshwang@postech.ac.kr avarsh@caltech.edu.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25766235" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Acetylation ; Amino Acid Sequence ; GTP-Binding Protein alpha Subunits, Gq-G11/metabolism ; HEK293 Cells ; HeLa Cells ; Humans ; Membrane Proteins/genetics/metabolism ; Mutant Proteins/chemistry/metabolism ; Protein Processing, Post-Translational ; Protein Stability ; Proteolysis ; RGS Proteins/chemistry/genetics/*metabolism ; Saccharomyces cerevisiae/genetics/metabolism ; Signal Transduction ; Ubiquitin-Protein Ligases/genetics/metabolism ; Ubiquitination
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 21
    Publication Date: 2015-07-18
    Description: Secretion of the cytokine interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta) by macrophages, a major driver of pathogenesis in atherosclerosis, requires two steps: Priming signals promote transcription of immature IL-1beta, and then endogenous "danger" signals activate innate immune signaling complexes called inflammasomes to process IL-1beta for secretion. Although cholesterol crystals are known to act as danger signals in atherosclerosis, what primes IL-1beta transcription remains elusive. Using a murine model of atherosclerosis, we found that cholesterol crystals acted both as priming and danger signals for IL-1beta production. Cholesterol crystals triggered neutrophils to release neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs). NETs primed macrophages for cytokine release, activating T helper 17 (TH17) cells that amplify immune cell recruitment in atherosclerotic plaques. Therefore, danger signals may drive sterile inflammation, such as that seen in atherosclerosis, through their interactions with neutrophils.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Warnatsch, Annika -- Ioannou, Marianna -- Wang, Qian -- Papayannopoulos, Venizelos -- MC_UP_1202/13/Medical Research Council/United Kingdom -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2015 Jul 17;349(6245):316-20. doi: 10.1126/science.aaa8064. Epub 2015 Jul 16.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Mill Hill Laboratory, Francis Crick Institute, London NW7 1AA, UK. ; Mill Hill Laboratory, Francis Crick Institute, London NW7 1AA, UK. veni.p@crick.ac.uk.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26185250" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Apolipoproteins E/genetics ; Atherosclerosis/*immunology ; Cells, Cultured ; Cholesterol/chemistry/immunology ; Disease Models, Animal ; Extracellular Traps/*immunology ; Humans ; Inflammasomes/immunology ; Inflammation/immunology ; Interleukin-1beta/*biosynthesis/genetics ; Macrophages/*immunology ; Mice ; Mice, Mutant Strains ; Neutrophils/*immunology ; Signal Transduction ; Th17 Cells/immunology ; Transcription, Genetic
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 22
    Publication Date: 2015-02-24
    Description: Navigation depends on multiple neural systems that encode the moment-to-moment changes in an animal's direction and location in space. These include head direction (HD) cells representing the orientation of the head and grid cells that fire at multiple locations, forming a repeating hexagonal grid pattern. Computational models hypothesize that generation of the grid cell signal relies upon HD information that ascends to the hippocampal network via the anterior thalamic nuclei (ATN). We inactivated or lesioned the ATN and subsequently recorded single units in the entorhinal cortex and parasubiculum. ATN manipulation significantly disrupted grid and HD cell characteristics while sparing theta rhythmicity in these regions. These results indicate that the HD signal via the ATN is necessary for the generation and function of grid cell activity.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4476794/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4476794/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Winter, Shawn S -- Clark, Benjamin J -- Taube, Jeffrey S -- NS053907/NS/NINDS NIH HHS/ -- R01 MH048924/MH/NIMH NIH HHS/ -- R01 NS053907/NS/NINDS NIH HHS/ -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2015 Feb 20;347(6224):870-4. doi: 10.1126/science.1259591. Epub 2015 Feb 5.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, Center for Cognitive Neuroscience, Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH 03755, USA. ; Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, Center for Cognitive Neuroscience, Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH 03755, USA. jeffrey.taube@dartmouth.edu.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25700518" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Anterior Thalamic Nuclei/drug effects/*physiology ; Entorhinal Cortex/cytology/*physiology ; Female ; Head ; Hippocampus/cytology/physiology ; Lidocaine/pharmacology ; Nerve Net/cytology/drug effects/*physiology ; Neurons/*physiology ; Orientation/*physiology ; Rats ; Rats, Inbred LEC ; Signal Transduction ; Spatial Navigation/*physiology ; Theta Rhythm
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 23
    Publication Date: 2015-08-01
    Description: The inefficient clearance of dying cells can lead to abnormal immune responses, such as unresolved inflammation and autoimmune conditions. We show that tumor suppressor p53 controls signaling-mediated phagocytosis of apoptotic cells through its target, Death Domain1alpha (DD1alpha), which suggests that p53 promotes both the proapoptotic pathway and postapoptotic events. DD1alpha appears to function as an engulfment ligand or receptor that engages in homophilic intermolecular interaction at intercellular junctions of apoptotic cells and macrophages, unlike other typical scavenger receptors that recognize phosphatidylserine on the surface of dead cells. DD1alpha-deficient mice showed in vivo defects in clearing dying cells, which led to multiple organ damage indicative of immune dysfunction. p53-induced expression of DD1alpha thus prevents persistence of cell corpses and ensures efficient generation of precise immune responses.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Yoon, Kyoung Wan -- Byun, Sanguine -- Kwon, Eunjeong -- Hwang, So-Young -- Chu, Kiki -- Hiraki, Masatsugu -- Jo, Seung-Hee -- Weins, Astrid -- Hakroush, Samy -- Cebulla, Angelika -- Sykes, David B -- Greka, Anna -- Mundel, Peter -- Fisher, David E -- Mandinova, Anna -- Lee, Sam W -- CA142805/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- CA149477/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- CA80058/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- DK062472/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- DK091218/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- DK093378/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- DK57683/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- S10RR027673/RR/NCRR NIH HHS/ -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2015 Jul 31;349(6247):1261669. doi: 10.1126/science.1261669.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Cutaneous Biology Research Center, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Building 149, 13th Street, Charlestown, MA 02129, USA. ; Department of Pathology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115, USA. ; Division of Nephrology, Department of Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA 02114, USA. ; Center for Regenerative Medicine and Technology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02114, USA. ; Department of Medicine, Glom-NExT Center for Glomerular Kidney Disease and Novel Experimental Therapeutics, Brigham and Women's Hospital, and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115, USA. ; Cutaneous Biology Research Center, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Building 149, 13th Street, Charlestown, MA 02129, USA. Broad Institute of Harvard and MIT, 7 Cambridge Center, Cambridge, MA 02142, USA. ; Cutaneous Biology Research Center, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Building 149, 13th Street, Charlestown, MA 02129, USA. Broad Institute of Harvard and MIT, 7 Cambridge Center, Cambridge, MA 02142, USA. swlee@mgh.harvard.edu.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26228159" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Amino Acid Sequence ; Animals ; Apoptosis/genetics/*immunology ; Autoimmune Diseases/genetics/immunology ; Cell Line, Tumor ; Female ; Humans ; Inflammation/genetics/immunology ; Macrophages/immunology ; Male ; Membrane Proteins/genetics/*metabolism ; Mice ; Mice, Knockout ; Molecular Sequence Data ; Phagocytosis/*immunology ; Phosphatidylserines/*metabolism ; Signal Transduction ; Tumor Suppressor Protein p53/*metabolism
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 24
    Publication Date: 2015-11-21
    Description: Drosophila intestinal stem cells (ISCs) generate enterocytes (ECs) and enteroendocrine (ee) cells. Previous work suggests that different levels of the Notch ligand Delta (Dl) in ISCs unidirectionally activate Notch in daughters to control multipotency. However, the mechanisms driving different outcomes remain unknown. We found that during ee cell formation, the ee cell marker Prospero localizes to the basal side of dividing ISCs. After asymmetric division, the ee daughter cell acts as a source of Dl that induces low Notch activity in the ISC to maintain identity. Alternatively, ISCs expressing Dl induce high Notch activity in daughter cells to promote EC formation. Our data reveal a conserved role for Notch in Drosophila and mammalian ISC maintenance and suggest that bidirectional Notch signaling may regulate multipotency in other systems.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Guo, Zheng -- Ohlstein, Benjamin -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2015 Nov 20;350(6263). pii: aab0988. doi: 10.1126/science.aab0988.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Genetics and Development, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY 10032, USA. ; Department of Genetics and Development, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY 10032, USA. bo2160@columbia.edu.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26586765" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; *Cell Differentiation ; Cell Division ; Cell Polarity ; Drosophila Proteins/*metabolism ; Drosophila melanogaster/cytology/*growth & development/metabolism ; Enterocytes/*cytology ; Enteroendocrine Cells/*cytology ; Multipotent Stem Cells/*cytology/metabolism ; Nuclear Proteins/*metabolism ; Phosphoproteins/*metabolism ; Receptors, Notch/*metabolism ; Signal Transduction ; Transcription Factors/*metabolism
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 25
    Publication Date: 2015-08-22
    Description: Plasma membrane depolarization can trigger cell proliferation, but how membrane potential influences mitogenic signaling is uncertain. Here, we show that plasma membrane depolarization induces nanoscale reorganization of phosphatidylserine and phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate but not other anionic phospholipids. K-Ras, which is targeted to the plasma membrane by electrostatic interactions with phosphatidylserine, in turn undergoes enhanced nanoclustering. Depolarization-induced changes in phosphatidylserine and K-Ras plasma membrane organization occur in fibroblasts, excitable neuroblastoma cells, and Drosophila neurons in vivo and robustly amplify K-Ras-dependent mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling. Conversely, plasma membrane repolarization disrupts K-Ras nanoclustering and inhibits MAPK signaling. By responding to voltage-induced changes in phosphatidylserine spatiotemporal dynamics, K-Ras nanoclusters set up the plasma membrane as a biological field-effect transistor, allowing membrane potential to control the gain in mitogenic signaling circuits.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4687752/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4687752/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Zhou, Yong -- Wong, Ching-On -- Cho, Kwang-jin -- van der Hoeven, Dharini -- Liang, Hong -- Thakur, Dhananiay P -- Luo, Jialie -- Babic, Milos -- Zinsmaier, Konrad E -- Zhu, Michael X -- Hu, Hongzhen -- Venkatachalam, Kartik -- Hancock, John F -- R01 NS081301/NS/NINDS NIH HHS/ -- R01NS081301/NS/NINDS NIH HHS/ -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2015 Aug 21;349(6250):873-6. doi: 10.1126/science.aaa5619.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Integrative Biology and Pharmacology, Medical School, University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, Houston, TX 77030, USA. ; Department of Diagnostic and Biomedical Sciences, Dental School, University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, Houston, TX 77054, USA. ; Department of Neuroscience, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721, USA. ; Department of Integrative Biology and Pharmacology, Medical School, University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, Houston, TX 77030, USA. Program in Cell and Regulatory Biology, University of Texas Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Houston, TX 77030, USA. ; Department of Integrative Biology and Pharmacology, Medical School, University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, Houston, TX 77030, USA. Program in Cell and Regulatory Biology, University of Texas Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Houston, TX 77030, USA. john.f.hancock@uth.tmc.edu.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26293964" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Cell Line, Tumor ; Cell Membrane/metabolism/*physiology ; Cricetinae ; Drosophila melanogaster ; Fibroblasts ; *Membrane Potentials ; Mice ; Neurons ; Phosphatidylinositol 4,5-Diphosphate/*metabolism ; Phosphatidylserines/*metabolism ; Signal Transduction ; ras Proteins/*metabolism
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 26
    Publication Date: 2015-02-28
    Description: Ebola virus causes sporadic outbreaks of lethal hemorrhagic fever in humans, but there is no currently approved therapy. Cells take up Ebola virus by macropinocytosis, followed by trafficking through endosomal vesicles. However, few factors controlling endosomal virus movement are known. Here we find that Ebola virus entry into host cells requires the endosomal calcium channels called two-pore channels (TPCs). Disrupting TPC function by gene knockout, small interfering RNAs, or small-molecule inhibitors halted virus trafficking and prevented infection. Tetrandrine, the most potent small molecule that we tested, inhibited infection of human macrophages, the primary target of Ebola virus in vivo, and also showed therapeutic efficacy in mice. Therefore, TPC proteins play a key role in Ebola virus infection and may be effective targets for antiviral therapy.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4550587/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4550587/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Sakurai, Yasuteru -- Kolokoltsov, Andrey A -- Chen, Cheng-Chang -- Tidwell, Michael W -- Bauta, William E -- Klugbauer, Norbert -- Grimm, Christian -- Wahl-Schott, Christian -- Biel, Martin -- Davey, Robert A -- R01 AI063513/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- R01AI063513/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2015 Feb 27;347(6225):995-8. doi: 10.1126/science.1258758.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Texas Biomedical Research Institute, San Antonio, TX, USA. ; The University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX, USA. ; Center for Integrated Protein Science Munich (CIPSM) at the Department of Pharmacy-Center for Drug Research, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitat Munchen, Munich, Germany. ; Southwest Research Institute, San Antonio, TX, USA. ; Institute for Experimental and Clinical Pharmacology and Toxicology, Albert-Ludwigs-Universitat Freiburg, Freiburg, Germany. ; Texas Biomedical Research Institute, San Antonio, TX, USA. rdavey@txbiomed.org.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25722412" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Antiviral Agents/*pharmacology/therapeutic use ; BALB 3T3 Cells ; Benzylisoquinolines/pharmacology/therapeutic use ; Calcium Channel Blockers/*pharmacology/therapeutic use ; Calcium Channels/genetics/*physiology ; Ebolavirus/drug effects/*physiology ; Female ; Gene Knockout Techniques ; HeLa Cells ; Hemorrhagic Fever, Ebola/drug therapy/*therapy/virology ; Humans ; Macrophages/drug effects/virology ; Mice ; *Molecular Targeted Therapy ; NADP/analogs & derivatives/metabolism ; RNA Interference ; Signal Transduction ; Verapamil/pharmacology/therapeutic use ; Virus Internalization/*drug effects
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 27
    Publication Date: 2015-09-01
    Description: Human mutations that truncate the massive sarcomere protein titin [TTN-truncating variants (TTNtvs)] are the most common genetic cause for dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM), a major cause of heart failure and premature death. Here we show that cardiac microtissues engineered from human induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells are a powerful system for evaluating the pathogenicity of titin gene variants. We found that certain missense mutations, like TTNtvs, diminish contractile performance and are pathogenic. By combining functional analyses with RNA sequencing, we explain why truncations in the A-band domain of TTN cause DCM, whereas truncations in the I band are better tolerated. Finally, we demonstrate that mutant titin protein in iPS cell-derived cardiomyocytes results in sarcomere insufficiency, impaired responses to mechanical and beta-adrenergic stress, and attenuated growth factor and cell signaling activation. Our findings indicate that titin mutations cause DCM by disrupting critical linkages between sarcomerogenesis and adaptive remodeling.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4618316/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4618316/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Hinson, John T -- Chopra, Anant -- Nafissi, Navid -- Polacheck, William J -- Benson, Craig C -- Swist, Sandra -- Gorham, Joshua -- Yang, Luhan -- Schafer, Sebastian -- Sheng, Calvin C -- Haghighi, Alireza -- Homsy, Jason -- Hubner, Norbert -- Church, George -- Cook, Stuart A -- Linke, Wolfgang A -- Chen, Christopher S -- Seidman, J G -- Seidman, Christine E -- EB017103/EB/NIBIB NIH HHS/ -- HG005550/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- HL007374/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS/ -- HL115553/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS/ -- HL125807/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS/ -- K08 HL125807/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS/ -- T32 HL007208/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS/ -- Department of Health/United Kingdom -- Howard Hughes Medical Institute/ -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2015 Aug 28;349(6251):982-6. doi: 10.1126/science.aaa5458.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA 02115, USA. jthinson@partners.org cseidman@genetics.med.harvard.edu. ; Department of Biomedical Engineering, Boston University, Boston, MA 02215, USA. The Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard University, Boston, MA 02115, USA. ; Department of Genetics, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115, USA. ; Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA 02215, USA. ; Department of Cardiovascular Physiology, Ruhr University Bochum, MA 3/56 D-44780, Bochum, Germany. ; The Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard University, Boston, MA 02115, USA. Department of Genetics, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115, USA. ; Cardiovascular and Metabolic Sciences, Max Delbruck Center for Molecular Medicine, Berlin, Germany. ; Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA 02115, USA. Department of Genetics, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115, USA. Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Chevy Chase, MD 20815, USA. ; Cardiovascular and Metabolic Sciences, Max Delbruck Center for Molecular Medicine, Berlin, Germany. DZHK (German Center for Cardiovascular Research), Partner Site Berlin, Berlin, Germany. ; National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Biomedical Research Unit in Cardiovascular Disease at Royal Brompton and Harefield National Health Service (NHS) Foundation Trust, Imperial College London, London, UK. National Heart Centre and Duke-National University, Singapore, Singapore. ; Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA 02115, USA. Department of Genetics, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115, USA. Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Chevy Chase, MD 20815, USA. jthinson@partners.org cseidman@genetics.med.harvard.edu.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26315439" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Adrenergic beta-Agonists/pharmacology ; Cardiomyopathy, Dilated/*genetics/pathology/*physiopathology ; Cells, Cultured ; Connectin/chemistry/*genetics/*physiology ; Heart Rate ; Humans ; Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells/*physiology ; Isoproterenol/pharmacology ; Mutant Proteins/chemistry/physiology ; *Mutation, Missense ; Myocardial Contraction ; Myocytes, Cardiac/*physiology ; RNA/genetics/metabolism ; Sarcomeres/*physiology/ultrastructure ; Sequence Analysis, RNA ; Signal Transduction ; Stress, Physiological
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 28
    Publication Date: 2015-10-03
    Description: Body-size constancy and symmetry are signs of developmental stability. Yet, it is unclear exactly how developing animals buffer size variation. Drosophila insulin-like peptide Dilp8 is responsive to growth perturbations and controls homeostatic mechanisms that coordinately adjust growth and maturation to maintain size within the normal range. Here we show that Lgr3 is a Dilp8 receptor. Through the use of functional and adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate assays, we defined a pair of Lgr3 neurons that mediate homeostatic regulation. These neurons have extensive axonal arborizations, and genetic and green fluorescent protein reconstitution across synaptic partners show that these neurons connect with the insulin-producing cells and prothoracicotropic hormone-producing neurons to attenuate growth and maturation. This previously unrecognized circuit suggests how growth and maturation rate are matched and co-regulated according to Dilp8 signals to stabilize organismal size.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Vallejo, Diana M -- Juarez-Carreno, Sergio -- Bolivar, Jorge -- Morante, Javier -- Dominguez, Maria -- OD010949-10/OD/NIH HHS/ -- P40OD018537/OD/NIH HHS/ -- R01-GM084947/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2015 Nov 13;350(6262):aac6767. doi: 10.1126/science.aac6767. Epub 2015 Oct 1.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Instituto de Neurociencias, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas and Universidad Miguel Hernandez, Campus de Sant Joan, Apartado 18, 03550 Sant Joan, Alicante, Spain. ; Departamento de Biomedicina, Biotecnologia y Salud Publica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Cadiz, Poligono Rio San Pedro s/n, 11510 Puerto Real, Spain. ; Instituto de Neurociencias, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas and Universidad Miguel Hernandez, Campus de Sant Joan, Apartado 18, 03550 Sant Joan, Alicante, Spain. m.dominguez@umh.es j.morante@umh.es.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26429885" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Adenosine Monophosphate/metabolism ; Animals ; Body Size ; Brain/cytology/*growth & development/metabolism ; Drosophila Proteins/genetics/*metabolism ; Drosophila melanogaster/*growth & development/metabolism ; Homeostasis ; Insect Hormones/genetics/metabolism ; Insulin/*metabolism ; Intercellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins/genetics/*metabolism ; Nerve Net/cytology/metabolism ; Neurons/*metabolism ; Receptors, G-Protein-Coupled/genetics/*metabolism ; Receptors, Peptide/genetics/*metabolism ; Signal Transduction ; Synapses/metabolism
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 29
    Publication Date: 2015-02-01
    Description: During virus infection, the adaptor proteins MAVS and STING transduce signals from the cytosolic nucleic acid sensors RIG-I and cGAS, respectively, to induce type I interferons (IFNs) and other antiviral molecules. Here we show that MAVS and STING harbor two conserved serine and threonine clusters that are phosphorylated by the kinases IKK and/or TBK1 in response to stimulation. Phosphorylated MAVS and STING then bind to a positively charged surface of interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF3) and thereby recruit IRF3 for its phosphorylation and activation by TBK1. We further show that TRIF, an adaptor protein in Toll-like receptor signaling, activates IRF3 through a similar phosphorylation-dependent mechanism. These results reveal that phosphorylation of innate adaptor proteins is an essential and conserved mechanism that selectively recruits IRF3 to activate the type I IFN pathway.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Liu, Siqi -- Cai, Xin -- Wu, Jiaxi -- Cong, Qian -- Chen, Xiang -- Li, Tuo -- Du, Fenghe -- Ren, Junyao -- Wu, You-Tong -- Grishin, Nick V -- Chen, Zhijian J -- AI-93967/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- GM-094575/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- GM-63692/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- Howard Hughes Medical Institute/ -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2015 Mar 13;347(6227):aaa2630. doi: 10.1126/science.aaa2630. Epub 2015 Jan 29.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Molecular Biology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX 75390-9148, USA. ; Departments of Biophysics and Biochemistry, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX 75390-9148, USA. ; Department of Molecular Biology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX 75390-9148, USA. Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI), University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX 75390-9148, USA. ; Departments of Biophysics and Biochemistry, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX 75390-9148, USA. Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI), University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX 75390-9148, USA. ; Department of Molecular Biology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX 75390-9148, USA. Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI), University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX 75390-9148, USA. zhijian.chen@utsouthwestern.edu.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25636800" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Adaptor Proteins, Signal Transducing/chemistry/*metabolism ; Adaptor Proteins, Vesicular Transport/chemistry/*metabolism ; Amino Acid Sequence ; Animals ; Cell Line ; Humans ; I-kappa B Kinase/metabolism ; Interferon Regulatory Factor-3/chemistry/*metabolism ; Interferon-alpha/biosynthesis ; Interferon-beta/biosynthesis ; Membrane Proteins/chemistry/*metabolism ; Mice ; Molecular Sequence Data ; Phosphorylation ; Protein Binding ; Protein Multimerization ; Protein-Serine-Threonine Kinases/metabolism ; Recombinant Proteins/metabolism ; Sendai virus/physiology ; Serine/metabolism ; Signal Transduction ; Ubiquitination ; Vesiculovirus/physiology
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 30
    Publication Date: 2015-01-09
    Description: The mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) protein kinase is a master growth regulator that responds to multiple environmental cues. Amino acids stimulate, in a Rag-, Ragulator-, and vacuolar adenosine triphosphatase-dependent fashion, the translocation of mTORC1 to the lysosomal surface, where it interacts with its activator Rheb. Here, we identify SLC38A9, an uncharacterized protein with sequence similarity to amino acid transporters, as a lysosomal transmembrane protein that interacts with the Rag guanosine triphosphatases (GTPases) and Ragulator in an amino acid-sensitive fashion. SLC38A9 transports arginine with a high Michaelis constant, and loss of SLC38A9 represses mTORC1 activation by amino acids, particularly arginine. Overexpression of SLC38A9 or just its Ragulator-binding domain makes mTORC1 signaling insensitive to amino acid starvation but not to Rag activity. Thus, SLC38A9 functions upstream of the Rag GTPases and is an excellent candidate for being an arginine sensor for the mTORC1 pathway.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4295826/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4295826/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Wang, Shuyu -- Tsun, Zhi-Yang -- Wolfson, Rachel L -- Shen, Kuang -- Wyant, Gregory A -- Plovanich, Molly E -- Yuan, Elizabeth D -- Jones, Tony D -- Chantranupong, Lynne -- Comb, William -- Wang, Tim -- Bar-Peled, Liron -- Zoncu, Roberto -- Straub, Christoph -- Kim, Choah -- Park, Jiwon -- Sabatini, Bernardo L -- Sabatini, David M -- AI47389/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- F30 CA180754/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- F31 AG044064/AG/NIA NIH HHS/ -- F31 CA180271/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01 CA103866/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R37 AI047389/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- T32 GM007287/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- T32 GM007753/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- Howard Hughes Medical Institute/ -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2015 Jan 9;347(6218):188-94. doi: 10.1126/science.1257132. Epub 2015 Jan 7.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research and Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Biology, 9 Cambridge Center, Cambridge, MA 02142, USA. Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Department of Biology, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA. Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA. Broad Institute of Harvard and Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 7 Cambridge Center, Cambridge, MA 02142, USA. ; Harvard Medical School, 260 Longwood Avenue, Boston, MA 02115, USA. ; Department of Neurobiology, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Harvard Medical School, 220 Longwood Avenue, Boston, MA 02115, USA. ; Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research and Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Biology, 9 Cambridge Center, Cambridge, MA 02142, USA. Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Department of Biology, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA. Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA. Broad Institute of Harvard and Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 7 Cambridge Center, Cambridge, MA 02142, USA. sabatini@wi.mit.edu.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25567906" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Amino Acid Sequence ; Amino Acid Transport Systems/chemistry/genetics/*metabolism ; Arginine/deficiency/*metabolism ; HEK293 Cells ; Humans ; Lysosomes/*enzymology ; Molecular Sequence Data ; Monomeric GTP-Binding Proteins/*metabolism ; Multiprotein Complexes/*metabolism ; Protein Structure, Tertiary ; Signal Transduction ; TOR Serine-Threonine Kinases/*metabolism
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 31
    Publication Date: 2015-11-14
    Description: In healthy individuals, the intestinal microbiota cannot access the liver, spleen, or other peripheral tissues. Some pathogenic bacteria can reach these sites, however, and can induce a systemic immune response. How such compartmentalization is achieved is unknown. We identify a gut-vascular barrier (GVB) in mice and humans that controls the translocation of antigens into the blood stream and prohibits entry of the microbiota. Salmonella typhimurium can penetrate the GVB in a manner dependent on its pathogenicity island (Spi) 2-encoded type III secretion system and on decreased beta-catenin-dependent signaling in gut endothelial cells. The GVB is modified in celiac disease patients with elevated serum transaminases, which indicates that GVB dismantling may be responsible for liver damage in these patients. Understanding the GVB may provide new insights into the regulation of the gut-liver axis.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Spadoni, Ilaria -- Zagato, Elena -- Bertocchi, Alice -- Paolinelli, Roberta -- Hot, Edina -- Di Sabatino, Antonio -- Caprioli, Flavio -- Bottiglieri, Luca -- Oldani, Amanda -- Viale, Giuseppe -- Penna, Giuseppe -- Dejana, Elisabetta -- Rescigno, Maria -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2015 Nov 13;350(6262):830-4. doi: 10.1126/science.aad0135.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Experimental Oncology, European Institute of Oncology, Milan, Italy. ; The Italian Foundation for Cancer Research (FIRC) Institute of Molecular Oncology (IFOM), Milan, Italy. ; First Department of Medicine, St. Matteo Hospital, University of Pavia, Pavia, Italy. ; Unita Operativa Gastroenterologia ed Endoscopia, Fondazione IRCCS Ca Granda, Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico di Milano, and Dipartimento di Fisiopatologia Medico-Chirurgica e dei Trapianti, Universita degli Studi di Milano, Milan, Italy. ; Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, European Institute of Oncology, Milan, Italy. ; The Italian Foundation for Cancer Research (FIRC) Institute of Molecular Oncology (IFOM), Milan, Italy. Department of Biosciences, Universita degli Studi di Milano, Italy. Department of Genetics, Immunology and Pathology, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden. ; Department of Experimental Oncology, European Institute of Oncology, Milan, Italy. Department of Biosciences, Universita degli Studi di Milano, Italy. maria.rescigno@ieo.eu.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26564856" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Antigens, Bacterial/blood/immunology ; Capillary Permeability/*immunology ; Celiac Disease/blood/immunology/microbiology ; Genomic Islands/genetics/immunology ; Humans ; Ileum/blood supply/immunology/microbiology ; Intestinal Mucosa/immunology/microbiology ; Intestines/blood supply/*immunology/*microbiology ; Liver/immunology ; Mice ; Mice, Inbred C57BL ; Microbiota/*immunology ; Salmonella Infections/*immunology ; Salmonella typhimurium/genetics/*immunology/pathogenicity ; Signal Transduction ; Spleen/immunology ; Transaminases/blood ; Type III Secretion Systems/genetics/immunology ; Wnt Signaling Pathway ; beta Catenin/metabolism
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 32
    facet.materialart.
    Unknown
    American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS)
    Publication Date: 2015-10-03
    Description: 〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Cohen, Jeremiah Y -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2015 Oct 2;350(6256):47. doi: 10.1126/science.aad3003.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Solomon H. Snyder Department of Neuroscience, Brain Science Institute, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA. jeremiah.cohen@jhmi.edu.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26430113" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Brain/*physiology ; Dopamine/*metabolism ; Dopaminergic Neurons/*metabolism ; Electric Stimulation ; Humans ; Mice ; Neurophysiology/trends ; *Reward ; Serotonin/*metabolism ; Signal Transduction ; Time Factors ; Ventral Tegmental Area/*cytology
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 33
    Publication Date: 2015-08-15
    Description: Astrocytes are important regulatory elements in brain function. They respond to neurotransmitters and release gliotransmitters that modulate synaptic transmission. However, the cell- and synapse-specificity of the functional relationship between astrocytes and neurons in certain brain circuits remains unknown. In the dorsal striatum, which mainly comprises two intermingled subtypes (striatonigral and striatopallidal) of medium spiny neurons (MSNs) and synapses belonging to two neural circuits (the direct and indirect pathways of the basal ganglia), subpopulations of astrocytes selectively responded to specific MSN subtype activity. These subpopulations of astrocytes released glutamate that selectively activated N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors in homotypic, but not heterotypic, MSNs. Likewise, astrocyte subpopulations selectively regulated homotypic synapses through metabotropic glutamate receptor activation. Therefore, bidirectional astrocyte-neuron signaling selectively occurs between specific subpopulations of astrocytes, neurons, and synapses.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Martin, R -- Bajo-Graneras, R -- Moratalla, R -- Perea, G -- Araque, A -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2015 Aug 14;349(6249):730-4. doi: 10.1126/science.aaa7945.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Instituto Cajal, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, 28002 Madrid, Spain. ; Instituto Cajal, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, 28002 Madrid, Spain. Centro de Investigacion Biomedica en Red Enfermedades Neurodegenerativas, Instituto de Salud Carlos III, 28029 Madrid, Spain. ; Department of Neuroscience, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455, USA. araque@umn.edu.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26273054" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Astrocytes/*physiology ; Basal Ganglia/cytology/*physiology ; Cell Communication ; Glutamates/*metabolism ; Mice ; Mice, Inbred C57BL ; Mice, Transgenic ; Nerve Net/physiology ; Neurons/*physiology ; Receptors, Metabotropic Glutamate/agonists/metabolism ; Receptors, N-Methyl-D-Aspartate/agonists/metabolism ; Signal Transduction ; Synapses/*physiology ; *Synaptic Transmission
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 34
    Publication Date: 2015-10-10
    Description: Leucine is a proteogenic amino acid that also regulates many aspects of mammalian physiology, in large part by activating the mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) protein kinase, a master growth controller. Amino acids signal to mTORC1 through the Rag guanosine triphosphatases (GTPases). Several factors regulate the Rags, including GATOR1, aGTPase-activating protein; GATOR2, a positive regulator of unknown function; and Sestrin2, a GATOR2-interacting protein that inhibits mTORC1 signaling. We find that leucine, but not arginine, disrupts the Sestrin2-GATOR2 interaction by binding to Sestrin2 with a dissociation constant of 20 micromolar, which is the leucine concentration that half-maximally activates mTORC1. The leucine-binding capacity of Sestrin2 is required for leucine to activate mTORC1 in cells. These results indicate that Sestrin2 is a leucine sensor for the mTORC1 pathway.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4698017/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4698017/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Wolfson, Rachel L -- Chantranupong, Lynne -- Saxton, Robert A -- Shen, Kuang -- Scaria, Sonia M -- Cantor, Jason R -- Sabatini, David M -- AI47389/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- F30 CA189333/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- F31 CA180271/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01 CA103866/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R37 AI047389/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- T32 GM007753/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- Howard Hughes Medical Institute/ -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2016 Jan 1;351(6268):43-8. doi: 10.1126/science.aab2674. Epub 2015 Oct 8.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research and Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Biology, 9 Cambridge Center, Cambridge, MA 02142, USA. Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Department of Biology, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA. Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA. Broad Institute of Harvard and Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 7 Cambridge Center, Cambridge, MA 02142, USA. ; Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research and Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Biology, 9 Cambridge Center, Cambridge, MA 02142, USA. Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Department of Biology, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA. ; Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research and Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Biology, 9 Cambridge Center, Cambridge, MA 02142, USA. Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Department of Biology, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA. Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA. Broad Institute of Harvard and Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 7 Cambridge Center, Cambridge, MA 02142, USA. sabatini@wi.mit.edu.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26449471" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: GTPase-Activating Proteins/*metabolism ; HEK293 Cells ; Humans ; Leucine/*metabolism ; Metabolic Networks and Pathways ; Multiprotein Complexes/*metabolism ; Nuclear Proteins/chemistry/genetics/*metabolism ; Protein Binding ; Proteins/chemistry/*metabolism ; Signal Transduction ; TOR Serine-Threonine Kinases/*metabolism
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 35
    Publication Date: 2015-04-11
    Description: Protein phosphorylation regulates virtually all biological processes. Although protein kinases are popular drug targets, targeting protein phosphatases remains a challenge. Here, we describe Sephin1 (selective inhibitor of a holophosphatase), a small molecule that safely and selectively inhibited a regulatory subunit of protein phosphatase 1 in vivo. Sephin1 selectively bound and inhibited the stress-induced PPP1R15A, but not the related and constitutive PPP1R15B, to prolong the benefit of an adaptive phospho-signaling pathway, protecting cells from otherwise lethal protein misfolding stress. In vivo, Sephin1 safely prevented the motor, morphological, and molecular defects of two otherwise unrelated protein-misfolding diseases in mice, Charcot-Marie-Tooth 1B, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Thus, regulatory subunits of phosphatases are drug targets, a property exploited here to safely prevent two protein misfolding diseases.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4490275/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4490275/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Das, Indrajit -- Krzyzosiak, Agnieszka -- Schneider, Kim -- Wrabetz, Lawrence -- D'Antonio, Maurizio -- Barry, Nicholas -- Sigurdardottir, Anna -- Bertolotti, Anne -- 309516/European Research Council/International -- MC_U105185860/Medical Research Council/United Kingdom -- R01-NS55256/NS/NINDS NIH HHS/ -- Medical Research Council/United Kingdom -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2015 Apr 10;348(6231):239-42. doi: 10.1126/science.aaa4484.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Medical Research Council Laboratory of Molecular Biology, Francis Crick Avenue, Cambridge, CB2 0QH, UK. ; Division of Genetics and Cell Biology, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, 20132 Milan, Italy. ; Medical Research Council Laboratory of Molecular Biology, Francis Crick Avenue, Cambridge, CB2 0QH, UK. aberto@mrc-lmb.cam.ac.uk.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25859045" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis/drug therapy/metabolism/pathology ; Animals ; Cells, Cultured ; Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease/drug therapy/metabolism/pathology ; Disease Models, Animal ; Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress/drug effects ; Enzyme Inhibitors/metabolism/pharmacokinetics/*pharmacology/toxicity ; Guanabenz/*analogs & derivatives/chemical ; synthesis/metabolism/pharmacology/toxicity ; HeLa Cells ; Humans ; Mice ; Mice, Transgenic ; Molecular Targeted Therapy ; Phosphorylation ; Protein Folding ; Protein Phosphatase 1/*antagonists & inhibitors ; Proteostasis Deficiencies/*drug therapy/*prevention & control ; Signal Transduction
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 36
    Publication Date: 2015-09-19
    Description: Prostate cancer is initially responsive to androgen deprivation, but the effectiveness of androgen receptor (AR) inhibitors in recurrent disease is variable. Biopsy of bone metastases is challenging; hence, sampling circulating tumor cells (CTCs) may reveal drug-resistance mechanisms. We established single-cell RNA-sequencing (RNA-Seq) profiles of 77 intact CTCs isolated from 13 patients (mean six CTCs per patient), by using microfluidic enrichment. Single CTCs from each individual display considerable heterogeneity, including expression of AR gene mutations and splicing variants. Retrospective analysis of CTCs from patients progressing under treatment with an AR inhibitor, compared with untreated cases, indicates activation of noncanonical Wnt signaling (P = 0.0064). Ectopic expression of Wnt5a in prostate cancer cells attenuates the antiproliferative effect of AR inhibition, whereas its suppression in drug-resistant cells restores partial sensitivity, a correlation also evident in an established mouse model. Thus, single-cell analysis of prostate CTCs reveals heterogeneity in signaling pathways that could contribute to treatment failure.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Miyamoto, David T -- Zheng, Yu -- Wittner, Ben S -- Lee, Richard J -- Zhu, Huili -- Broderick, Katherine T -- Desai, Rushil -- Fox, Douglas B -- Brannigan, Brian W -- Trautwein, Julie -- Arora, Kshitij S -- Desai, Niyati -- Dahl, Douglas M -- Sequist, Lecia V -- Smith, Matthew R -- Kapur, Ravi -- Wu, Chin-Lee -- Shioda, Toshi -- Ramaswamy, Sridhar -- Ting, David T -- Toner, Mehmet -- Maheswaran, Shyamala -- Haber, Daniel A -- 2R01CA129933/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- EB008047/EB/NIBIB NIH HHS/ -- Howard Hughes Medical Institute/ -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2015 Sep 18;349(6254):1351-6. doi: 10.1126/science.aab0917.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Massachusetts General Cancer Center, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Charlestown, MA 02129, USA. Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Charlestown, MA 02129, USA. ; Massachusetts General Cancer Center, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Charlestown, MA 02129, USA. Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Chevy Chase, MD 20815, USA. ; Massachusetts General Cancer Center, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Charlestown, MA 02129, USA. Department of Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Charlestown, MA 02129, USA. ; Massachusetts General Cancer Center, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Charlestown, MA 02129, USA. ; Massachusetts General Cancer Center, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Charlestown, MA 02129, USA. Department of Pathology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Charlestown, MA 02129, USA. ; Massachusetts General Cancer Center, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Charlestown, MA 02129, USA. Department of Urology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Charlestown, MA 02129, USA. ; Center for Bioengineering in Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Charlestown, MA 02129, USA. ; Massachusetts General Cancer Center, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Charlestown, MA 02129, USA. Department of Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Charlestown, MA 02129, USA. haber@helix.mgh.harvard.edu smaheswaran@mgh.harvard.edu. ; Massachusetts General Cancer Center, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Charlestown, MA 02129, USA. Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Chevy Chase, MD 20815, USA. Department of Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Charlestown, MA 02129, USA. haber@helix.mgh.harvard.edu smaheswaran@mgh.harvard.edu.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26383955" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Androgen Antagonists/pharmacology/*therapeutic use ; Animals ; Cell Line, Tumor ; Drug Resistance, Neoplasm/*genetics ; Humans ; Male ; Mice ; Neoplastic Cells, Circulating/drug effects/*metabolism ; Phenylthiohydantoin/*analogs & derivatives/pharmacology/therapeutic use ; Prostate/drug effects/metabolism/pathology ; Prostatic Neoplasms/*drug therapy/*pathology ; Proto-Oncogene Proteins/genetics/metabolism ; RNA Splicing ; Receptors, Androgen/*genetics ; Sequence Analysis, RNA/methods ; Signal Transduction ; Single-Cell Analysis/methods ; Transcriptome ; Wnt Proteins/genetics/*metabolism ; Xenograft Model Antitumor Assays
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 37
    Publication Date: 2015-06-20
    Description: G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) relay diverse extracellular signals into cells by catalyzing nucleotide release from heterotrimeric G proteins, but the mechanism underlying this quintessential molecular signaling event has remained unclear. Here we use atomic-level simulations to elucidate the nucleotide-release mechanism. We find that the G protein alpha subunit Ras and helical domains-previously observed to separate widely upon receptor binding to expose the nucleotide-binding site-separate spontaneously and frequently even in the absence of a receptor. Domain separation is necessary but not sufficient for rapid nucleotide release. Rather, receptors catalyze nucleotide release by favoring an internal structural rearrangement of the Ras domain that weakens its nucleotide affinity. We use double electron-electron resonance spectroscopy and protein engineering to confirm predictions of our computationally determined mechanism.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Dror, Ron O -- Mildorf, Thomas J -- Hilger, Daniel -- Manglik, Aashish -- Borhani, David W -- Arlow, Daniel H -- Philippsen, Ansgar -- Villanueva, Nicolas -- Yang, Zhongyu -- Lerch, Michael T -- Hubbell, Wayne L -- Kobilka, Brian K -- Sunahara, Roger K -- Shaw, David E -- P30EY00331/EY/NEI NIH HHS/ -- R01EY05216/EY/NEI NIH HHS/ -- R01GM083118/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- T32 GM008294/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2015 Jun 19;348(6241):1361-5. doi: 10.1126/science.aaa5264.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉D. E. Shaw Research, New York, NY 10036, USA. ron.dror@deshawresearch.com david.shaw@deshawresearch.com. ; D. E. Shaw Research, New York, NY 10036, USA. ; Department of Molecular and Cellular Physiology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA. ; Department of Pharmacology, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, USA. ; Jules Stein Eye Institute and Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095, USA. ; D. E. Shaw Research, New York, NY 10036, USA. Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biophysics, Columbia University, New York, NY 10032, USA. ron.dror@deshawresearch.com david.shaw@deshawresearch.com.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26089515" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: GTP-Binding Protein alpha Subunits, Gi-Go/*chemistry ; GTP-Binding Protein alpha Subunits, Gs/*chemistry ; Guanine Nucleotide Exchange Factors/*chemistry ; Humans ; Models, Chemical ; Molecular Dynamics Simulation ; Protein Structure, Secondary ; Protein Structure, Tertiary ; Receptors, G-Protein-Coupled/*chemistry ; Signal Transduction
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 38
    Publication Date: 2015-08-22
    Description: Elucidating the signaling mechanism of strigolactones has been the key to controlling the devastating problem caused by the parasitic plant Striga hermonthica. To overcome the genetic intractability that has previously interfered with identification of the strigolactone receptor, we developed a fluorescence turn-on probe, Yoshimulactone Green (YLG), which activates strigolactone signaling and illuminates signal perception by the strigolactone receptors. Here we describe how strigolactones bind to and act via ShHTLs, the diverged family of alpha/beta hydrolase-fold proteins in Striga. Live imaging using YLGs revealed that a dynamic wavelike propagation of strigolactone perception wakes up Striga seeds. We conclude that ShHTLs function as the strigolactone receptors mediating seed germination in Striga. Our findings enable access to strigolactone receptors and observation of the regulatory dynamics for strigolactone signal transduction in Striga.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Tsuchiya, Yuichiro -- Yoshimura, Masahiko -- Sato, Yoshikatsu -- Kuwata, Keiko -- Toh, Shigeo -- Holbrook-Smith, Duncan -- Zhang, Hua -- McCourt, Peter -- Itami, Kenichiro -- Kinoshita, Toshinori -- Hagihara, Shinya -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2015 Aug 21;349(6250):864-8. doi: 10.1126/science.aab3831.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Institute of Transformative Bio-Molecules (WPI-ITbM), Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8602, Japan. Department of Cell and Systems Biology, University of Toronto, 25 Willcocks Street, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3B2, Canada. yuichiro@itbm.nagoya-u.ac.jp hagi@itbm.nagoya-u.ac.jp. ; Institute of Transformative Bio-Molecules (WPI-ITbM), Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8602, Japan. Graduate School of Science, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8602, Japan. ; Institute of Transformative Bio-Molecules (WPI-ITbM), Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8602, Japan. ; Department of Cell and Systems Biology, University of Toronto, 25 Willcocks Street, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3B2, Canada. ; Institute of Transformative Bio-Molecules (WPI-ITbM), Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8602, Japan. Graduate School of Science, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8602, Japan. Japan Science and Technology Agency-Exploratory Research for Advanced Technology, Itami Molecular Nanocarbon Project, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8602, Japan. ; Institute of Transformative Bio-Molecules (WPI-ITbM), Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8602, Japan. Graduate School of Science, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8602, Japan. yuichiro@itbm.nagoya-u.ac.jp hagi@itbm.nagoya-u.ac.jp.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26293962" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Fluoresceins/chemistry/metabolism ; Fluorescence ; Fluorescent Dyes/chemistry/metabolism ; *Germination ; Hydrolases/metabolism ; Hydrolysis ; Lactones/*metabolism ; Molecular Imaging/methods ; Molecular Sequence Data ; Plant Growth Regulators/*metabolism ; Plant Proteins/genetics/*metabolism ; Receptors, Cell Surface/genetics/*metabolism ; Seeds/*growth & development/metabolism ; Signal Transduction ; Striga/*growth & development/metabolism
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 39
    Publication Date: 2015-06-13
    Description: Cell division progresses to anaphase only after all chromosomes are connected to spindle microtubules through kinetochores and the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) is satisfied. We show that the amino-terminal localization module of the SAC protein kinase MPS1 (monopolar spindle 1) directly interacts with the HEC1 (highly expressed in cancer 1) calponin homology domain in the NDC80 (nuclear division cycle 80) kinetochore complex in vitro, in a phosphorylation-dependent manner. Microtubule polymers disrupted this interaction. In cells, MPS1 binding to kinetochores or to ectopic NDC80 complexes was prevented by end-on microtubule attachment, independent of known kinetochore protein-removal mechanisms. Competition for kinetochore binding between SAC proteins and microtubules provides a direct and perhaps evolutionarily conserved way to detect a properly organized spindle ready for cell division.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Hiruma, Yoshitaka -- Sacristan, Carlos -- Pachis, Spyridon T -- Adamopoulos, Athanassios -- Kuijt, Timo -- Ubbink, Marcellus -- von Castelmur, Eleonore -- Perrakis, Anastassis -- Kops, Geert J P L -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2015 Jun 12;348(6240):1264-7. doi: 10.1126/science.aaa4055. Epub 2015 Jun 11.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Division of Biochemistry, Netherlands Cancer Institute, 1066 CX Amsterdam, Netherlands. Molecular Cancer Research, University Medical Center Utrecht, 3584 CG Utrecht, Netherlands. Cancer Genomics Netherlands, University Medical Center Utrecht, 3584 CG Utrecht, Netherlands. ; Molecular Cancer Research, University Medical Center Utrecht, 3584 CG Utrecht, Netherlands. Cancer Genomics Netherlands, University Medical Center Utrecht, 3584 CG Utrecht, Netherlands. ; Division of Biochemistry, Netherlands Cancer Institute, 1066 CX Amsterdam, Netherlands. ; Leiden Institute of Chemistry, Leiden University, Post Office Box 9502, 2300 RA Leiden, Netherlands. ; Division of Biochemistry, Netherlands Cancer Institute, 1066 CX Amsterdam, Netherlands. g.j.p.l.kops@umcutrecht.nl a.perrakis@nki.nl. ; Molecular Cancer Research, University Medical Center Utrecht, 3584 CG Utrecht, Netherlands. Cancer Genomics Netherlands, University Medical Center Utrecht, 3584 CG Utrecht, Netherlands. g.j.p.l.kops@umcutrecht.nl a.perrakis@nki.nl.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26068855" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Anaphase ; Binding, Competitive ; Calcium-Binding Proteins/genetics/metabolism ; *Cell Cycle Checkpoints ; Cell Cycle Proteins/*metabolism ; HeLa Cells ; Humans ; Kinetochores/*metabolism ; Microfilament Proteins/genetics/metabolism ; Microtubules/*metabolism ; Nuclear Proteins/chemistry/*metabolism ; Phosphorylation ; Protein-Serine-Threonine Kinases/*metabolism ; Protein-Tyrosine Kinases/*metabolism ; Signal Transduction ; Spindle Apparatus/*metabolism
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 40
    Publication Date: 2015-11-21
    Description: Stabilization of the hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1) increases life span and health span in nematodes through an unknown mechanism. We report that neuronal stabilization of HIF-1 mediates these effects in Caenorhabditis elegans through a cell nonautonomous signal to the intestine, which results in activation of the xenobiotic detoxification enzyme flavin-containing monooxygenase-2 (FMO-2). This prolongevity signal requires the serotonin biosynthetic enzyme TPH-1 in neurons and the serotonin receptor SER-7 in the intestine. Intestinal FMO-2 is also activated by dietary restriction (DR) and is necessary for DR-mediated life-span extension, which suggests that this enzyme represents a point of convergence for two distinct longevity pathways. FMOs are conserved in eukaryotes and induced by multiple life span-extending interventions in mice, which suggests that these enzymes may play a critical role in promoting health and longevity across phyla.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Leiser, Scott F -- Miller, Hillary -- Rossner, Ryan -- Fletcher, Marissa -- Leonard, Alison -- Primitivo, Melissa -- Rintala, Nicholas -- Ramos, Fresnida J -- Miller, Dana L -- Kaeberlein, Matt -- P30AG013280/AG/NIA NIH HHS/ -- R00AGA0033050/PHS HHS/ -- R01AG038518/AG/NIA NIH HHS/ -- T32AG000057/AG/NIA NIH HHS/ -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2015 Dec 11;350(6266):1375-8. doi: 10.1126/science.aac9257. Epub 2015 Nov 19.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Pathology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195, USA. ; Department of Biochemistry, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195, USA. ; Department of Pathology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195, USA. kaeber@uw.edu.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26586189" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Basic Helix-Loop-Helix Transcription Factors/metabolism ; Caenorhabditis elegans/genetics/metabolism/*physiology ; Caenorhabditis elegans Proteins/chemistry/genetics/metabolism/*physiology ; Diet ; Intestines/*enzymology ; Longevity/genetics/*physiology ; Mice ; Neurons/*metabolism ; Oxygenases/genetics/*physiology ; Protein Stability ; RNA Interference ; Receptors, Serotonin/metabolism ; Signal Transduction ; Transcription Factors/chemistry/*metabolism ; Tryptophan Hydroxylase/metabolism
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 41