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  • Rats  (2,686)
  • American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS)  (2,686)
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  • 1
    Publication Date: 2016-02-06
    Description: SH3 and multiple ankyrin repeat domains 3 (SHANK3) haploinsufficiency is causative for the neurological features of Phelan-McDermid syndrome (PMDS), including a high risk of autism spectrum disorder (ASD). We used unbiased, quantitative proteomics to identify changes in the phosphoproteome of Shank3-deficient neurons. Down-regulation of protein kinase B (PKB/Akt)-mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) signaling resulted from enhanced phosphorylation and activation of serine/threonine protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) regulatory subunit, B56beta, due to increased steady-state levels of its kinase, Cdc2-like kinase 2 (CLK2). Pharmacological and genetic activation of Akt or inhibition of CLK2 relieved synaptic deficits in Shank3-deficient and PMDS patient-derived neurons. CLK2 inhibition also restored normal sociability in a Shank3-deficient mouse model. Our study thereby provides a novel mechanistic and potentially therapeutic understanding of deregulated signaling downstream of Shank3 deficiency.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Bidinosti, Michael -- Botta, Paolo -- Kruttner, Sebastian -- Proenca, Catia C -- Stoehr, Natacha -- Bernhard, Mario -- Fruh, Isabelle -- Mueller, Matthias -- Bonenfant, Debora -- Voshol, Hans -- Carbone, Walter -- Neal, Sarah J -- McTighe, Stephanie M -- Roma, Guglielmo -- Dolmetsch, Ricardo E -- Porter, Jeffrey A -- Caroni, Pico -- Bouwmeester, Tewis -- Luthi, Andreas -- Galimberti, Ivan -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2016 Mar 11;351(6278):1199-203. doi: 10.1126/science.aad5487. Epub 2016 Feb 4.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Developmental Molecular Pathways, Novartis Institutes for Biomedical Research, Basel, Switzerland. ; Friedrich Miescher Institute, Basel, Switzerland. ; Analytical Sciences and Imaging, Novartis Institutes for Biomedical Research, Basel, Switzerland. ; Neuroscience, Novartis Institutes for Biomedical Research, Cambridge, USA. ; Developmental Molecular Pathways, Novartis Institutes for Biomedical Research, Basel, Switzerland. ivan.galimberti@novartis.com.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26847545" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Amino Acid Sequence ; Animals ; Autism Spectrum Disorder/*drug therapy/enzymology/genetics ; Chromosome Deletion ; Chromosome Disorders/genetics ; Chromosomes, Human, Pair 22/genetics ; Disease Models, Animal ; Down-Regulation ; Gene Knockdown Techniques ; Humans ; Insulin-Like Growth Factor I/metabolism ; Mice ; Molecular Sequence Data ; Multiprotein Complexes/metabolism ; Nerve Tissue Proteins/*genetics ; Neurons/enzymology ; Phosphorylation ; Protein Phosphatase 2/metabolism ; Protein-Serine-Threonine Kinases/*antagonists & inhibitors/metabolism ; Protein-Tyrosine Kinases/*antagonists & inhibitors/metabolism ; Proteomics ; Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-akt/genetics/metabolism ; Rats ; Signal Transduction ; TOR Serine-Threonine Kinases/metabolism
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 2
    Publication Date: 2016-03-26
    Description: Cell assembly sequences during learning are "replayed" during hippocampal ripples and contribute to the consolidation of episodic memories. However, neuronal sequences may also reflect preexisting dynamics. We report that sequences of place-cell firing in a novel environment are formed from a combination of the contributions of a rigid, predominantly fast-firing subset of pyramidal neurons with low spatial specificity and limited change across sleep-experience-sleep and a slow-firing plastic subset. Slow-firing cells, rather than fast-firing cells, gained high place specificity during exploration, elevated their association with ripples, and showed increased bursting and temporal coactivation during postexperience sleep. Thus, slow- and fast-firing neurons, although forming a continuous distribution, have different coding and plastic properties.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Grosmark, Andres D -- Buzsaki, Gyorgy -- MH102840/MH/NIMH NIH HHS/ -- MH54671/MH/NIMH NIH HHS/ -- NS075015/NS/NINDS NIH HHS/ -- R01 MH107396/MH/NIMH NIH HHS/ -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2016 Mar 25;351(6280):1440-3. doi: 10.1126/science.aad1935.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Neuroscience, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY 10019, USA. The Neuroscience Institute, School of Medicine, New York University, New York, NY 10016, USA. ; The Neuroscience Institute, School of Medicine, New York University, New York, NY 10016, USA. Center for Neural Science, New York University, New York, NY 10016, USA. gyorgy.buzsaki@nyumc.org.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27013730" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Action Potentials ; Animals ; Hippocampus/cytology/*physiopathology ; Learning/*physiology ; Male ; Maze Learning ; Neuronal Plasticity ; Pyramidal Cells/*physiology ; Rats ; Rats, Inbred LEC ; Sleep/physiology
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 3
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    American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS)
    Publication Date: 2016-01-02
    Description: 〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Servick, Kelly -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2016 Jan 1;351(6268):15. doi: 10.1126/science.351.6268.15.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26721984" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; California ; Cell Differentiation ; Clinical Trials as Topic ; Drug Industry ; Embryonic Stem Cells/cytology/*transplantation ; Financing, Organized ; Humans ; Photoreceptor Cells/physiology ; Rats ; Regenerative Medicine/*economics/*trends ; Retina/cytology/physiology ; Stem Cell Research/*economics
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 4
    Publication Date: 2016-02-26
    Description: Voltage-gated CaV1.2 channels (L-type calcium channel alpha1C subunits) are critical mediators of transcription-dependent neural plasticity. Whether these channels signal via the influx of calcium ion (Ca(2+)), voltage-dependent conformational change (VDeltaC), or a combination of the two has thus far been equivocal. We fused CaV1.2 to a ligand-gated Ca(2+)-permeable channel, enabling independent control of localized Ca(2+) and VDeltaC signals. This revealed an unexpected dual requirement: Ca(2+) must first mobilize actin-bound Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II, freeing it for subsequent VDeltaC-mediated accumulation. Neither signal alone sufficed to activate transcription. Signal order was crucial: Efficiency peaked when Ca(2+) preceded VDeltaC by 10 to 20 seconds. CaV1.2 VDeltaC synergistically augmented signaling by N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors. Furthermore, VDeltaC mistuning correlated with autistic symptoms in Timothy syndrome. Thus, nonionic VDeltaC signaling is vital to the function of CaV1.2 in synaptic and neuropsychiatric processes.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Li, Boxing -- Tadross, Michael R -- Tsien, Richard W -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2016 Feb 19;351(6275):863-7. doi: 10.1126/science.aad3647.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Neuroscience and Physiology and New York University Neuroscience Institute, New York, NY 10016, USA. ; Department of Molecular and Cellular Physiology, Beckman Center, School of Medicine, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA. Janelia Research Campus, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Ashburn, VA 20147, USA. tadrossm@janelia.hhmi.org. ; Department of Neuroscience and Physiology and New York University Neuroscience Institute, New York, NY 10016, USA. Department of Molecular and Cellular Physiology, Beckman Center, School of Medicine, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26912895" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Autistic Disorder/genetics/metabolism ; Calcium Channel Blockers/pharmacology ; Calcium Channels, L-Type/chemistry/*metabolism ; *Calcium Signaling ; Calcium-Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinase Type 2/*metabolism ; Cells, Cultured ; Cyclic AMP Response Element-Binding Protein/metabolism ; *Gene Expression Regulation ; HEK293 Cells ; Hippocampus/cytology ; Humans ; Long QT Syndrome/genetics/metabolism ; Neuronal Plasticity/*genetics ; Neurons/drug effects/*metabolism ; Nimodipine/pharmacology ; Protein Conformation/drug effects ; Rats ; Rats, Sprague-Dawley ; Receptors, N-Methyl-D-Aspartate/metabolism ; Synapses/metabolism ; Syndactyly/genetics/metabolism
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 5
    Publication Date: 2016-01-02
    Description: Motivation for reward drives adaptive behaviors, whereas impairment of reward perception and experience (anhedonia) can contribute to psychiatric diseases, including depression and schizophrenia. We sought to test the hypothesis that the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) controls interactions among specific subcortical regions that govern hedonic responses. By using optogenetic functional magnetic resonance imaging to locally manipulate but globally visualize neural activity in rats, we found that dopamine neuron stimulation drives striatal activity, whereas locally increased mPFC excitability reduces this striatal response and inhibits the behavioral drive for dopaminergic stimulation. This chronic mPFC overactivity also stably suppresses natural reward-motivated behaviors and induces specific new brainwide functional interactions, which predict the degree of anhedonia in individuals. These findings describe a mechanism by which mPFC modulates expression of reward-seeking behavior, by regulating the dynamical interactions between specific distant subcortical regions.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4772156/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4772156/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Ferenczi, Emily A -- Zalocusky, Kelly A -- Liston, Conor -- Grosenick, Logan -- Warden, Melissa R -- Amatya, Debha -- Katovich, Kiefer -- Mehta, Hershel -- Patenaude, Brian -- Ramakrishnan, Charu -- Kalanithi, Paul -- Etkin, Amit -- Knutson, Brian -- Glover, Gary H -- Deisseroth, Karl -- 1F31MH105151_01/MH/NIMH NIH HHS/ -- P41 EB015891/EB/NIBIB NIH HHS/ -- R00 MH097822/MH/NIMH NIH HHS/ -- Howard Hughes Medical Institute/ -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2016 Jan 1;351(6268):aac9698. doi: 10.1126/science.aac9698.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Bioengineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA. Neurosciences Program, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA. ; Brain Mind Research Institute, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, NY 10065, USA. ; Department of Neurobiology and Behavior, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853, USA. ; Department of Bioengineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA. ; Department of Psychology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA. ; Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA. ; Department of Neurosurgery, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA. ; Department of Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, 94305, USA. ; Department of Bioengineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA. Department of Neurobiology and Behavior, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853, USA. Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, 94305, USA. deissero@stanford.edu.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26722001" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Anhedonia/*physiology ; Animals ; Brain Mapping ; Corpus Striatum/cytology/drug effects/*physiology ; Depressive Disorder/physiopathology ; Dopamine/pharmacology ; Dopaminergic Neurons/drug effects/*physiology ; Female ; Magnetic Resonance Imaging ; Male ; Mesencephalon/cytology/drug effects/physiology ; *Motivation ; Nerve Net/physiology ; Oxygen/blood ; Prefrontal Cortex/cytology/drug effects/*physiology ; Rats ; Rats, Inbred LEC ; Rats, Sprague-Dawley ; *Reward ; Schizophrenia/physiopathology
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
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    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 6
    Publication Date: 2016-03-19
    Description: Steroids regulate cell proliferation, tissue development, and cell signaling via two pathways: a nuclear receptor mechanism and genome-independent signaling. Sperm activation, egg maturation, and steroid-induced anesthesia are executed via the latter pathway, the key components of which remain unknown. Here, we present characterization of the human sperm progesterone receptor that is conveyed by the orphan enzyme alpha/beta hydrolase domain-containing protein 2 (ABHD2). We show that ABHD2 is highly expressed in spermatozoa, binds progesterone, and acts as a progesterone-dependent lipid hydrolase by depleting the endocannabinoid 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2AG) from plasma membrane. The 2AG inhibits the sperm calcium channel (CatSper), and its removal leads to calcium influx via CatSper and ensures sperm activation. This study reveals that progesterone-activated endocannabinoid depletion by ABHD2 is a general mechanism by which progesterone exerts its genome-independent action and primes sperm for fertilization.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Miller, Melissa R -- Mannowetz, Nadja -- Iavarone, Anthony T -- Safavi, Rojin -- Gracheva, Elena O -- Smith, James F -- Hill, Rose Z -- Bautista, Diana M -- Kirichok, Yuriy -- Lishko, Polina V -- 1S10OD020062-01/OD/NIH HHS/ -- R01 AR059385/AR/NIAMS NIH HHS/ -- R01AR059385/AR/NIAMS NIH HHS/ -- R01GM111802/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- R01HD068914/HD/NICHD NIH HHS/ -- R21HD081403/HD/NICHD NIH HHS/ -- S10RR025622/RR/NCRR NIH HHS/ -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2016 Apr 29;352(6285):555-9. doi: 10.1126/science.aad6887. Epub 2016 Mar 17.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Molecular and Cell Biology, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA. ; QB3/Chemistry Mass Spectrometry Facility, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA. ; Department of Cellular and Molecular Physiology; Department of Neuroscience, Program in Cellular Neuroscience, Neurodegeneration, and Repair (CNNR), Yale School of Medicine, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06536, USA. ; Department of Urology, University of California, San Francisco, CA 94143, USA. ; Department of Physiology, University of California, San Francisco, CA 94158, USA. ; Department of Molecular and Cell Biology, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA. lishko@berkeley.edu.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26989199" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Adult ; Animals ; Arachidonic Acids/*deficiency ; Calcium/metabolism ; Calcium Channels/metabolism ; Calcium Signaling ; Cell Membrane/metabolism ; Endocannabinoids/*deficiency ; Fertilization ; Glycerides/*deficiency ; Humans ; Hydrolases/genetics/*metabolism ; Male ; Mice ; Mice, Inbred C57BL ; Progesterone/*metabolism/pharmacology ; Rats ; Rats, Wistar ; Receptors, Progesterone/genetics/*metabolism ; Sperm Motility/drug effects/*physiology ; Spermatozoa/drug effects/metabolism/*physiology ; Young Adult
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
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    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 7
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    American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS)
    Publication Date: 2016-01-20
    Description: 〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Underwood, Emily -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2015 Dec 4;350(6265):1188-90. doi: 10.1126/science.350.6265.1188.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26785475" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Aging/blood/genetics/*physiology ; Animals ; Biological Clocks/genetics/*physiology ; Biomarkers/blood/metabolism ; DNA/genetics ; DNA Methylation ; Epigenesis, Genetic ; Humans ; Mice ; Rats ; Telomere Homeostasis
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 8
    Publication Date: 2016-03-19
    Description: Expansions of a hexanucleotide repeat (GGGGCC) in the noncoding region of the C9orf72 gene are the most common genetic cause of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia. Decreased expression of C9orf72 is seen in expansion carriers, suggesting that loss of function may play a role in disease. We found that two independent mouse lines lacking the C9orf72 ortholog (3110043O21Rik) in all tissues developed normally and aged without motor neuron disease. Instead, C9orf72 null mice developed progressive splenomegaly and lymphadenopathy with accumulation of engorged macrophage-like cells. C9orf72 expression was highest in myeloid cells, and the loss of C9orf72 led to lysosomal accumulation and altered immune responses in macrophages and microglia, with age-related neuroinflammation similar to C9orf72 ALS but not sporadic ALS human patient tissue. Thus, C9orf72 is required for the normal function of myeloid cells, and altered microglial function may contribute to neurodegeneration in C9orf72 expansion carriers.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉O'Rourke, J G -- Bogdanik, L -- Yanez, A -- Lall, D -- Wolf, A J -- Muhammad, A K M G -- Ho, R -- Carmona, S -- Vit, J P -- Zarrow, J -- Kim, K J -- Bell, S -- Harms, M B -- Miller, T M -- Dangler, C A -- Underhill, D M -- Goodridge, H S -- Lutz, C M -- Baloh, R H -- GM085796/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- NS069669/NS/NINDS NIH HHS/ -- NS078398/NS/NINDS NIH HHS/ -- NS087351/NS/NINDS NIH HHS/ -- UL1TR000124/TR/NCATS NIH HHS/ -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2016 Mar 18;351(6279):1324-9. doi: 10.1126/science.aaf1064.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Board of Governors Regenerative Medicine Institute, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, 8700 Beverly Boulevard, Los Angeles, CA 90048, USA. ; The Jackson Laboratory, Bar Harbor, ME, USA. ; Division of Biomedical Sciences, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, 8700 Beverly Boulevard, Los Angeles, CA 90048, USA. ; Department of Neurology, Washington University School of Medicine, 660 South Euclid Avenue, St. Louis, MO 63110, USA. ; Board of Governors Regenerative Medicine Institute, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, 8700 Beverly Boulevard, Los Angeles, CA 90048, USA. Department of Neurology, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, 8700 Beverly Boulevard, Los Angeles, CA 90048, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26989253" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Aging/immunology ; Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis/genetics/*immunology ; Animals ; Frontotemporal Dementia/genetics/*immunology ; Gene Knockdown Techniques ; Guanine Nucleotide Exchange Factors/genetics/*physiology ; Heterozygote ; Humans ; Lymphatic Diseases/genetics/immunology ; Macrophages/*immunology ; Mice ; Mice, Knockout ; Microglia/*immunology ; Myeloid Cells/*immunology ; Proteins/genetics/*physiology ; Rats ; Splenomegaly/genetics/immunology
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  • 9
    Publication Date: 2016-04-23
    Description: The microtubule (MT) cytoskeleton can transmit mechanical signals and resist compression in contracting cardiomyocytes. How MTs perform these roles remains unclear because of difficulties in observing MTs during the rapid contractile cycle. Here, we used high spatial and temporal resolution imaging to characterize MT behavior in beating mouse myocytes. MTs deformed under contractile load into sinusoidal buckles, a behavior dependent on posttranslational "detyrosination" of alpha-tubulin. Detyrosinated MTs associated with desmin at force-generating sarcomeres. When detyrosination was reduced, MTs uncoupled from sarcomeres and buckled less during contraction, which allowed sarcomeres to shorten and stretch with less resistance. Conversely, increased detyrosination promoted MT buckling, stiffened the myocyte, and correlated with impaired function in cardiomyopathy. Thus, detyrosinated MTs represent tunable, compression-resistant elements that may impair cardiac function in disease.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Robison, Patrick -- Caporizzo, Matthew A -- Ahmadzadeh, Hossein -- Bogush, Alexey I -- Chen, Christina Yingxian -- Margulies, Kenneth B -- Shenoy, Vivek B -- Prosser, Benjamin L -- HL089847/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS/ -- HL105993/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS/ -- R00-HL114879/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS/ -- R01EB017753/EB/NIBIB NIH HHS/ -- T32AR053461-09/AR/NIAMS NIH HHS/ -- T32HL007954/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS/ -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2016 Apr 22;352(6284):aaf0659. doi: 10.1126/science.aaf0659.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Physiology, Pennsylvania Muscle Institute, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA. ; Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Pennsylvania School of Engineering and Applied Science, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA. ; Department of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA. ; Department of Physiology, Pennsylvania Muscle Institute, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA. bpros@mail.med.upenn.edu.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27102488" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Desmin/metabolism ; Elasticity ; Heart Failure/metabolism/physiopathology ; Humans ; Male ; Mice ; Microtubules/*metabolism ; Models, Biological ; *Myocardial Contraction ; Myocytes, Cardiac/metabolism/*physiology ; Peptide Synthases/genetics/metabolism ; *Protein Processing, Post-Translational ; RNA, Small Interfering/genetics ; Rats ; Rats, Sprague-Dawley ; Sarcomeres/metabolism ; Tubulin/*metabolism ; Tyrosine/*metabolism
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    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 10
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    American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS)
    Publication Date: 2015-10-03
    Description: 〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Krupic, Julija -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2015 Oct 2;350(6256):47. doi: 10.1126/science.aad3002.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Cell and Developmental Biology, University College London, London WC1E 6BT, UK. j.krupic@ucl.ac.uk.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26430112" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Behavior, Animal ; Brain/*physiology/*ultrastructure ; *Distance Perception ; Fourier Analysis ; Humans ; Metric System ; Neurons/*physiology/*ultrastructure ; Rats ; Spatial Navigation/*physiology
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  • 11
    Publication Date: 2015-08-01
    Description: The actin cross-linking domain (ACD) is an actin-specific toxin produced by several pathogens, including life-threatening spp. of Vibrio cholerae, Vibrio vulnificus, and Aeromonas hydrophila. Actin cross-linking by ACD is thought to lead to slow cytoskeleton failure owing to a gradual sequestration of actin in the form of nonfunctional oligomers. Here, we found that ACD converted cytoplasmic actin into highly toxic oligomers that potently "poisoned" the ability of major actin assembly proteins, formins, to sustain actin polymerization. Thus, ACD can target the most abundant cellular protein by using actin oligomers as secondary toxins to efficiently subvert cellular functions of actin while functioning at very low doses.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4648357/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4648357/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Heisler, David B -- Kudryashova, Elena -- Grinevich, Dmitry O -- Suarez, Cristian -- Winkelman, Jonathan D -- Birukov, Konstantin G -- Kotha, Sainath R -- Parinandi, Narasimham L -- Vavylonis, Dimitrios -- Kovar, David R -- Kudryashov, Dmitri S -- R01 GM079265/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- R01 GM098430/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- R01 GM114666/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- R01 HL076259/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS/ -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2015 Jul 31;349(6247):535-9. doi: 10.1126/science.aab4090.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210, USA. The Ohio State Biochemistry Program, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210, USA. ; Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210, USA. kudryashov.1@osu.edu kudryashova.1@osu.edu. ; Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210, USA. ; Department of Molecular Genetics and Cell Biology, The University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637, USA. ; Section of Pulmonary and Critical Care and Lung Injury Center, Department of Medicine, The University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637, USA. ; Lipid Signaling and Lipidomics Laboratory, Division of Pulmonary, Allergy, Critical Care and Sleep Medicine, Department of Medicine, Dorothy M. Davis Heart and Lung Research Institute, College of Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210, USA. ; Department of Physics, Lehigh University, Bethlehem, PA 18015, USA. ; Department of Molecular Genetics and Cell Biology, The University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637, USA. Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, The University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637, USA. ; Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210, USA. The Ohio State Biochemistry Program, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210, USA. kudryashov.1@osu.edu kudryashova.1@osu.edu.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26228148" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Actins/*metabolism ; Animals ; Antigens, Bacterial/*chemistry/genetics/*toxicity ; Bacterial Toxins/*chemistry/genetics/*toxicity ; Cell Line ; Fetal Proteins/*antagonists & inhibitors ; Intestinal Mucosa/drug effects/metabolism ; Microfilament Proteins/*antagonists & inhibitors ; Nuclear Proteins/*antagonists & inhibitors ; Polymerization/drug effects ; Protein Structure, Tertiary ; Rats
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  • 12
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    American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS)
    Publication Date: 2015-10-17
    Description: 〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Vogel, Gretchen -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2015 Oct 16;350(6258):261-2. doi: 10.1126/science.350.6258.261.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26472885" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Cattle ; *Chimera ; *Embryonic Stem Cells ; *Financing, Organized ; Humans ; Mice ; National Institutes of Health (U.S.)/*economics ; Organ Transplantation ; Rats ; Stem Cell Research/*economics ; Swine ; United States
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  • 13
    Publication Date: 2015-02-24
    Description: Notch receptors guide mammalian cell fate decisions by engaging the proteins Jagged and Delta-like (DLL). The 2.3 angstrom resolution crystal structure of the interacting regions of the Notch1-DLL4 complex reveals a two-site, antiparallel binding orientation assisted by Notch1 O-linked glycosylation. Notch1 epidermal growth factor-like repeats 11 and 12 interact with the DLL4 Delta/Serrate/Lag-2 (DSL) domain and module at the N-terminus of Notch ligands (MNNL) domains, respectively. Threonine and serine residues on Notch1 are functionalized with O-fucose and O-glucose, which act as surrogate amino acids by making specific, and essential, contacts to residues on DLL4. The elucidation of a direct chemical role for O-glycans in Notch1 ligand engagement demonstrates how, by relying on posttranslational modifications of their ligand binding sites, Notch proteins have linked their functional capacity to developmentally regulated biosynthetic pathways.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4445638/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4445638/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Luca, Vincent C -- Jude, Kevin M -- Pierce, Nathan W -- Nachury, Maxence V -- Fischer, Suzanne -- Garcia, K Christopher -- 1R01-GM097015/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- R01 GM097015/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- Howard Hughes Medical Institute/ -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2015 Feb 20;347(6224):847-53. doi: 10.1126/science.1261093.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA. Department of Molecular and Cellular Physiology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA. Department of Structural Biology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA. ; Department of Molecular and Cellular Physiology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA. ; Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA. Department of Molecular and Cellular Physiology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA. Department of Structural Biology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA. kcgarcia@stanford.edu.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25700513" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Alagille Syndrome/genetics ; Amino Acid Sequence ; Amino Acid Substitution ; Animals ; Cell Line ; Conserved Sequence ; Crystallography, X-Ray ; Fucose/chemistry ; Glucose/chemistry ; Glycosylation ; Intracellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins/*chemistry/genetics ; Ligands ; Membrane Proteins/*chemistry/genetics/ultrastructure ; Molecular Sequence Data ; Molecular Targeted Therapy ; Polysaccharides/chemistry ; Precursor T-Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma/drug therapy/genetics ; Protein Binding ; Protein Structure, Tertiary ; Rats ; Receptor, Notch1/*chemistry/genetics/ultrastructure ; Serine/chemistry/genetics ; Threonine/chemistry/genetics
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  • 14
    Publication Date: 2015-02-24
    Description: Navigation depends on multiple neural systems that encode the moment-to-moment changes in an animal's direction and location in space. These include head direction (HD) cells representing the orientation of the head and grid cells that fire at multiple locations, forming a repeating hexagonal grid pattern. Computational models hypothesize that generation of the grid cell signal relies upon HD information that ascends to the hippocampal network via the anterior thalamic nuclei (ATN). We inactivated or lesioned the ATN and subsequently recorded single units in the entorhinal cortex and parasubiculum. ATN manipulation significantly disrupted grid and HD cell characteristics while sparing theta rhythmicity in these regions. These results indicate that the HD signal via the ATN is necessary for the generation and function of grid cell activity.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4476794/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4476794/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Winter, Shawn S -- Clark, Benjamin J -- Taube, Jeffrey S -- NS053907/NS/NINDS NIH HHS/ -- R01 MH048924/MH/NIMH NIH HHS/ -- R01 NS053907/NS/NINDS NIH HHS/ -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2015 Feb 20;347(6224):870-4. doi: 10.1126/science.1259591. Epub 2015 Feb 5.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, Center for Cognitive Neuroscience, Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH 03755, USA. ; Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, Center for Cognitive Neuroscience, Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH 03755, USA. jeffrey.taube@dartmouth.edu.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25700518" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Anterior Thalamic Nuclei/drug effects/*physiology ; Entorhinal Cortex/cytology/*physiology ; Female ; Head ; Hippocampus/cytology/physiology ; Lidocaine/pharmacology ; Nerve Net/cytology/drug effects/*physiology ; Neurons/*physiology ; Orientation/*physiology ; Rats ; Rats, Inbred LEC ; Signal Transduction ; Spatial Navigation/*physiology ; Theta Rhythm
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  • 15
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    American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS)
    Publication Date: 2015-05-23
    Description: 〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Kaiser, Jocelyn -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2015 May 22;348(6237):849. doi: 10.1126/science.348.6237.849.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25999487" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Aging/blood ; Animals ; Biological Assay ; *Blood ; Bone Morphogenetic Proteins/blood/pharmacology/*physiology ; Brain/drug effects/physiology ; Growth Differentiation Factors/blood/pharmacology/*physiology ; Heart/drug effects/physiology ; Mice ; Muscle, Skeletal/drug effects/physiology ; Myostatin/pharmacology/physiology ; Parabiosis ; Rats ; Regeneration/drug effects ; *Rejuvenation
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  • 16
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    American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS)
    Publication Date: 2015-04-04
    Description: 〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Pulla, Priyanka -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2015 Apr 3;348(6230):15-6. doi: 10.1126/science.348.6230.15.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25838358" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Adolescent ; Animals ; Blood Glucose ; *Cause of Death ; Child ; *Child Mortality ; Child, Preschool ; Coma/etiology/mortality ; Cyclopropanes/*toxicity ; Death, Sudden/etiology ; Eating ; Encephalitis/etiology/mortality ; Glucose/administration & dosage ; Glycine/*analogs & derivatives/toxicity ; Humans ; Hypoglycemia/drug therapy/*etiology/*mortality ; India/epidemiology ; Litchi/*toxicity ; Memory Disorders/etiology ; Mental Disorders/etiology ; Rats ; Seizures/etiology ; Toxins, Biological/*toxicity
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  • 17
    Publication Date: 2015-03-07
    Description: Human higher cognition is attributed to the evolutionary expansion and elaboration of the human cerebral cortex. However, the genetic mechanisms contributing to these developmental changes are poorly understood. We used comparative epigenetic profiling of human, rhesus macaque, and mouse corticogenesis to identify promoters and enhancers that have gained activity in humans. These gains are significantly enriched in modules of coexpressed genes in the cortex that function in neuronal proliferation, migration, and cortical-map organization. Gain-enriched modules also showed correlated gene expression patterns and similar transcription factor binding site enrichments in promoters and enhancers, suggesting that they are connected by common regulatory mechanisms. Our results reveal coordinated patterns of potential regulatory changes associated with conserved developmental processes during corticogenesis, providing insight into human cortical evolution.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4426903/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4426903/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Reilly, Steven K -- Yin, Jun -- Ayoub, Albert E -- Emera, Deena -- Leng, Jing -- Cotney, Justin -- Sarro, Richard -- Rakic, Pasko -- Noonan, James P -- 099175/Z/12/Z/Wellcome Trust/United Kingdom -- DA023999/DA/NIDA NIH HHS/ -- F32 GM106628/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- GM094780/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- NS014841/NS/NINDS NIH HHS/ -- P30 CA016359/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01 DA023999/DA/NIDA NIH HHS/ -- R01 GM094780/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- T32 GM007223/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- Medical Research Council/United Kingdom -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2015 Mar 6;347(6226):1155-9. doi: 10.1126/science.1260943.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Genetics, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, CT 06510, USA. ; Kavli Institute for Neuroscience, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, CT 06510, USA. Department of Neurobiology, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, CT 06510, USA. ; Department of Genetics, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, CT 06510, USA. Program in Computational Biology and Bioinformatics, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06511, USA. ; Department of Genetics, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, CT 06510, USA. Kavli Institute for Neuroscience, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, CT 06510, USA. Program in Computational Biology and Bioinformatics, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06511, USA. james.noonan@yale.edu.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25745175" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Cerebral Cortex/*growth & development ; Enhancer Elements, Genetic/*genetics ; *Epigenesis, Genetic ; *Evolution, Molecular ; *Gene Expression Regulation, Developmental ; Humans ; Macaca mulatta ; Mice ; Organogenesis/*genetics ; Promoter Regions, Genetic/*genetics ; Rats
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  • 18
    Publication Date: 2015-03-31
    Description: During intracellular membrane trafficking, N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor (NSF) and alpha-soluble NSF attachment protein (alpha-SNAP) disassemble the soluble NSF attachment protein receptor (SNARE) complex for recycling of the SNARE proteins. The molecular mechanism by which NSF disassembles the SNARE complex is largely unknown. Using single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy and magnetic tweezers, we found that NSF disassembled a single SNARE complex in only one round of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) turnover. Upon ATP cleavage, the NSF hexamer developed internal tension with dissociation of phosphate ions. After latent time measuring tens of seconds, NSF released the built-up tension in a burst within 20 milliseconds, resulting in disassembly followed by immediate release of the SNARE proteins. Thus, NSF appears to use a "spring-loaded" mechanism to couple ATP hydrolysis and unfolding of substrate proteins.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4441202/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4441202/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Ryu, Je-Kyung -- Min, Duyoung -- Rah, Sang-Hyun -- Kim, Soo Jin -- Park, Yongsoo -- Kim, Haesoo -- Hyeon, Changbong -- Kim, Ho Min -- Jahn, Reinhard -- Yoon, Tae-Young -- 3P01GM072694-05S1/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- P01 GM072694/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2015 Mar 27;347(6229):1485-9. doi: 10.1126/science.aaa5267.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉National Creative Research Initiative Center for Single-Molecule Systems Biology, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST), Daejeon 305-701, South Korea. Department of Physics, KAIST, Daejeon 305-701, South Korea. ; Graduate School of Medical Science and Engineering, KAIST, Daejeon 305-701, South Korea. ; Department of Neurobiology, Max-Planck-Institute for Biophysical Chemistry, 37077 Gottingen, Germany. ; Korea Institute for Advanced Study, Seoul 130-722, South Korea. ; Department of Neurobiology, Max-Planck-Institute for Biophysical Chemistry, 37077 Gottingen, Germany. rjahn@gwdg.de tyyoon@kaist.ac.kr. ; National Creative Research Initiative Center for Single-Molecule Systems Biology, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST), Daejeon 305-701, South Korea. Department of Physics, KAIST, Daejeon 305-701, South Korea. rjahn@gwdg.de tyyoon@kaist.ac.kr.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25814585" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Adenosine Triphosphate/*metabolism ; Animals ; Cattle ; Cricetinae ; Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer ; Hydrolysis ; N-Ethylmaleimide-Sensitive Proteins/*metabolism ; Rats ; SNARE Proteins/*metabolism ; Soluble N-Ethylmaleimide-Sensitive Factor Attachment Proteins/*metabolism ; Spectrometry, Fluorescence
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  • 19
    Publication Date: 2015-07-04
    Description: Larger brains tend to have more folded cortices, but what makes the cortex fold has remained unknown. We show that the degree of cortical folding scales uniformly across lissencephalic and gyrencephalic species, across individuals, and within individual cortices as a function of the product of cortical surface area and the square root of cortical thickness. This relation is derived from the minimization of the effective free energy associated with cortical shape according to a simple physical model, based on known mechanisms of axonal elongation. This model also explains the scaling of the folding index of crumpled paper balls. We discuss the implications of this finding for the evolutionary and developmental origin of folding, including the newfound continuum between lissencephaly and gyrencephaly, and for pathologies such as human lissencephaly.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Mota, Bruno -- Herculano-Houzel, Suzana -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2015 Jul 3;349(6243):74-7. doi: 10.1126/science.aaa9101.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. ; Instituto de Ciencias Biomedicas, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Instituto Nacional de Neurociencia Translacional, INCT/MCT, Sao Paulo, Brazil. suzanahh@gmail.com.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26138976" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Cell Count ; *Cerebral Cortex/cytology/embryology/pathology ; Humans ; Lissencephaly/*pathology ; Mice ; Models, Neurological ; Neurons/*cytology/pathology ; Rats ; Species Specificity
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  • 20
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    American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS)
    Publication Date: 2015-02-07
    Description: 〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Buzsaki, Gyorgy -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2015 Feb 6;347(6222):612-3. doi: 10.1126/science.aaa6505.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉New York University Neuroscience Institute, New York University Langone Center, New York, NY 10016, USA. gyorgy.buzsaki@nyumc.org.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25657232" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Brain Mapping ; Hippocampus/*physiology ; Maze Learning ; Pyramidal Cells/*physiology ; Rats ; Sensation/*physiology ; Space Perception/*physiology
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  • 21
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    American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS)
    Publication Date: 2015-08-15
    Description: 〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Service, Robert F -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2015 Aug 14;349(6249):677. doi: 10.1126/science.349.6249.677.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26273032" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Analgesics, Opioid/*metabolism ; Animals ; Carbohydrates ; *Genetic Engineering ; Papaver/genetics/*metabolism ; Rats ; Saccharomyces cerevisiae/genetics/*metabolism ; Synthetic Biology
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  • 22
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    American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS)
    Publication Date: 2015-01-13
    Description: 〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Service, Robert F -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2015 Jan 9;347(6218):114. doi: 10.1126/science.347.6218.114.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25573999" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Bionics ; *Electrodes, Implanted ; Movement ; Paralysis/physiopathology/*therapy ; Rats ; Sensation ; Spinal Cord Injuries/physiopathology/*therapy ; *Walking
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  • 23
    Publication Date: 2015-01-24
    Description: The 26S proteasome is a key player in eukaryotic protein quality control and in the regulation of numerous cellular processes. Here, we describe quantitative in situ structural studies of this highly dynamic molecular machine in intact hippocampal neurons. We used electron cryotomography with the Volta phase plate, which allowed high fidelity and nanometer precision localization of 26S proteasomes. We undertook a molecular census of single- and double-capped proteasomes and assessed the conformational states of individual complexes. Under the conditions of the experiment-that is, in the absence of proteotoxic stress-only 20% of the 26S proteasomes were engaged in substrate processing. The remainder was in the substrate-accepting ground state. These findings suggest that in the absence of stress, the capacity of the proteasome system is not fully used.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Asano, Shoh -- Fukuda, Yoshiyuki -- Beck, Florian -- Aufderheide, Antje -- Forster, Friedrich -- Danev, Radostin -- Baumeister, Wolfgang -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2015 Jan 23;347(6220):439-42. doi: 10.1126/science.1261197.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Molecular Structural Biology, Max-Planck Institute of Biochemistry, 82152 Martinsried, Germany. ; Department of Molecular Structural Biology, Max-Planck Institute of Biochemistry, 82152 Martinsried, Germany. baumeist@biochem.mpg.de.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25613890" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Cells, Cultured ; Hippocampus/*cytology/enzymology ; Neurons/*enzymology/*ultrastructure ; Proteasome Endopeptidase Complex/*chemistry ; Protein Conformation ; Rats ; Stress, Physiological
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  • 24
    Publication Date: 2015-02-28
    Description: Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a major factor in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes (T2D) and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). The mitochondrial protonophore 2,4 dinitrophenol (DNP) has beneficial effects on NAFLD, insulin resistance, and obesity in preclinical models but is too toxic for clinical use. We developed a controlled-release oral formulation of DNP, called CRMP (controlled-release mitochondrial protonophore), that produces mild hepatic mitochondrial uncoupling. In rat models, CRMP reduced hypertriglyceridemia, insulin resistance, hepatic steatosis, and diabetes. It also normalized plasma transaminase concentrations, ameliorated liver fibrosis, and improved hepatic protein synthetic function in a methionine/choline-deficient rat model of NASH. Chronic treatment with CRMP was not associated with any systemic toxicity. These data offer proof of concept that mild hepatic mitochondrial uncoupling may be a safe and effective therapy for the related epidemics of metabolic syndrome, T2D, and NASH.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4495920/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4495920/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Perry, Rachel J -- Zhang, Dongyan -- Zhang, Xian-Man -- Boyer, James L -- Shulman, Gerald I -- P30 DK-34989/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- P30 DK-45735/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- P30 DK034989/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- P30 DK045735/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- R01 DK-40936/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- R01 DK040936/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- R24 DK-085638/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- T32 DK-101019/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- U24 DK-059635/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- UL1 TR-000142/TR/NCATS NIH HHS/ -- Howard Hughes Medical Institute/ -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2015 Mar 13;347(6227):1253-6. doi: 10.1126/science.aaa0672. Epub 2015 Feb 26.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, USA. Departments of Internal Medicine, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, USA. Department of Cellular and Molecular Physiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, USA. ; Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, USA. ; Departments of Internal Medicine, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, USA. ; Departments of Internal Medicine, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, USA. Yale Liver Center, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, USA. ; Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, USA. Departments of Internal Medicine, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, USA. Department of Cellular and Molecular Physiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, USA. gerald.shulman@yale.edu.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25721504" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: 2,4-Dinitrophenol/*administration & dosage/toxicity ; Animals ; Blood Glucose/metabolism ; Delayed-Action Preparations/*administration & dosage ; Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/*drug therapy/metabolism ; Glucose Tolerance Test ; Insulin Resistance ; Lipid Metabolism ; Liver Cirrhosis/drug therapy ; Male ; Mice ; Mitochondria, Liver/drug effects/metabolism ; Muscle, Skeletal/metabolism ; Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease/*drug therapy/metabolism ; Oxidation-Reduction ; Proton Ionophores/*administration & dosage/toxicity ; Random Allocation ; Rats ; Rats, Zucker
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  • 25
    Publication Date: 2015-07-15
    Description: Neuronal circuits produce self-sustaining sequences of activity patterns, but the precise mechanisms remain unknown. Here we provide evidence for autoassociative dynamics in sequence generation. During sharp-wave ripple (SWR) events, hippocampal neurons express sequenced reactivations, which we show are composed of discrete attractors. Each attractor corresponds to a single location, the representation of which sharpens over the course of several milliseconds, as the reactivation focuses at that location. Subsequently, the reactivation transitions rapidly to a spatially discontiguous location. This alternation between sharpening and transition occurs repeatedly within individual SWRs and is locked to the slow-gamma (25 to 50 hertz) rhythm. These findings support theoretical notions of neural network function and reveal a fundamental discretization in the retrieval of memory in the hippocampus, together with a function for gamma oscillations in the control of attractor dynamics.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Pfeiffer, Brad E -- Foster, David J -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2015 Jul 10;349(6244):180-3. doi: 10.1126/science.aaa9633.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Solomon H. Snyder Department of Neuroscience, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA. ; Solomon H. Snyder Department of Neuroscience, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA. david.foster@jhu.edu.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26160946" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Gamma Rhythm ; Hippocampus/*cytology/*physiology ; Male ; Mental Recall/*physiology ; Neural Pathways ; Neurons/*physiology ; Rats ; Rats, Inbred LEC
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  • 26
    Publication Date: 2015-02-14
    Description: Although it is generally accepted that cellular differentiation requires changes to transcriptional networks, dynamic regulation of promoters and enhancers at specific sets of genes has not been previously studied en masse. Exploiting the fact that active promoters and enhancers are transcribed, we simultaneously measured their activity in 19 human and 14 mouse time courses covering a wide range of cell types and biological stimuli. Enhancer RNAs, then messenger RNAs encoding transcription factors, dominated the earliest responses. Binding sites for key lineage transcription factors were simultaneously overrepresented in enhancers and promoters active in each cellular system. Our data support a highly generalizable model in which enhancer transcription is the earliest event in successive waves of transcriptional change during cellular differentiation or activation.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4681433/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4681433/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Arner, Erik -- Daub, Carsten O -- Vitting-Seerup, Kristoffer -- Andersson, Robin -- Lilje, Berit -- Drablos, Finn -- Lennartsson, Andreas -- Ronnerblad, Michelle -- Hrydziuszko, Olga -- Vitezic, Morana -- Freeman, Tom C -- Alhendi, Ahmad M N -- Arner, Peter -- Axton, Richard -- Baillie, J Kenneth -- Beckhouse, Anthony -- Bodega, Beatrice -- Briggs, James -- Brombacher, Frank -- Davis, Margaret -- Detmar, Michael -- Ehrlund, Anna -- Endoh, Mitsuhiro -- Eslami, Afsaneh -- Fagiolini, Michela -- Fairbairn, Lynsey -- Faulkner, Geoffrey J -- Ferrai, Carmelo -- Fisher, Malcolm E -- Forrester, Lesley -- Goldowitz, Daniel -- Guler, Reto -- Ha, Thomas -- Hara, Mitsuko -- Herlyn, Meenhard -- Ikawa, Tomokatsu -- Kai, Chieko -- Kawamoto, Hiroshi -- Khachigian, Levon M -- Klinken, S Peter -- Kojima, Soichi -- Koseki, Haruhiko -- Klein, Sarah -- Mejhert, Niklas -- Miyaguchi, Ken -- Mizuno, Yosuke -- Morimoto, Mitsuru -- Morris, Kelly J -- Mummery, Christine -- Nakachi, Yutaka -- Ogishima, Soichi -- Okada-Hatakeyama, Mariko -- Okazaki, Yasushi -- Orlando, Valerio -- Ovchinnikov, Dmitry -- Passier, Robert -- Patrikakis, Margaret -- Pombo, Ana -- Qin, Xian-Yang -- Roy, Sugata -- Sato, Hiroki -- Savvi, Suzana -- Saxena, Alka -- Schwegmann, Anita -- Sugiyama, Daisuke -- Swoboda, Rolf -- Tanaka, Hiroshi -- Tomoiu, Andru -- Winteringham, Louise N -- Wolvetang, Ernst -- Yanagi-Mizuochi, Chiyo -- Yoneda, Misako -- Zabierowski, Susan -- Zhang, Peter -- Abugessaisa, Imad -- Bertin, Nicolas -- Diehl, Alexander D -- Fukuda, Shiro -- Furuno, Masaaki -- Harshbarger, Jayson -- Hasegawa, Akira -- Hori, Fumi -- Ishikawa-Kato, Sachi -- Ishizu, Yuri -- Itoh, Masayoshi -- Kawashima, Tsugumi -- Kojima, Miki -- Kondo, Naoto -- Lizio, Marina -- Meehan, Terrence F -- Mungall, Christopher J -- Murata, Mitsuyoshi -- Nishiyori-Sueki, Hiromi -- Sahin, Serkan -- Nagao-Sato, Sayaka -- Severin, Jessica -- de Hoon, Michiel J L -- Kawai, Jun -- Kasukawa, Takeya -- Lassmann, Timo -- Suzuki, Harukazu -- Kawaji, Hideya -- Summers, Kim M -- Wells, Christine -- FANTOM Consortium -- Hume, David A -- Forrest, Alistair R R -- Sandelin, Albin -- Carninci, Piero -- Hayashizaki, Yoshihide -- P30 CA010815/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2015 Feb 27;347(6225):1010-4. doi: 10.1126/science.1259418. Epub 2015 Feb 12.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25678556" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Binding Sites ; Cattle ; Cell Differentiation/*genetics ; Dogs ; *Enhancer Elements, Genetic ; *Gene Expression Regulation, Developmental ; Mice ; RNA, Messenger/genetics/metabolism ; Rats ; Stem Cells/*cytology/metabolism ; Transcription Factors/*metabolism ; *Transcription, Genetic
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  • 27
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    Unknown
    American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS)
    Publication Date: 2015-10-17
    Description: 〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Kupferschmidt, Kai -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2015 Oct 16;350(6258):263-4. doi: 10.1126/science.350.6258.263.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26472886" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Cerebral Cortex/*ultrastructure ; *Computer Simulation ; Investments ; *Models, Neurological ; Neurons/*ultrastructure ; Neurosciences/*economics ; Rats
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  • 28
    Publication Date: 2015-03-15
    Description: After central nervous system (CNS) injury, inhibitory factors in the lesion scar and poor axon growth potential prevent axon regeneration. Microtubule stabilization reduces scarring and promotes axon growth. However, the cellular mechanisms of this dual effect remain unclear. Here, delayed systemic administration of a blood-brain barrier-permeable microtubule-stabilizing drug, epothilone B (epoB), decreased scarring after rodent spinal cord injury (SCI) by abrogating polarization and directed migration of scar-forming fibroblasts. Conversely, epothilone B reactivated neuronal polarization by inducing concerted microtubule polymerization into the axon tip, which propelled axon growth through an inhibitory environment. Together, these drug-elicited effects promoted axon regeneration and improved motor function after SCI. With recent clinical approval, epothilones hold promise for clinical use after CNS injury.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4445125/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4445125/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Ruschel, Jorg -- Hellal, Farida -- Flynn, Kevin C -- Dupraz, Sebastian -- Elliott, David A -- Tedeschi, Andrea -- Bates, Margaret -- Sliwinski, Christopher -- Brook, Gary -- Dobrindt, Kristina -- Peitz, Michael -- Brustle, Oliver -- Norenberg, Michael D -- Blesch, Armin -- Weidner, Norbert -- Bunge, Mary Bartlett -- Bixby, John L -- Bradke, Frank -- R01 HD057632/HD/NICHD NIH HHS/ -- R01 NS059866/NS/NINDS NIH HHS/ -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2015 Apr 17;348(6232):347-52. doi: 10.1126/science.aaa2958. Epub 2015 Mar 12.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Axonal Growth and Regeneration, German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases, Ludwig-Erhard-Allee 2, 53175 Bonn, Germany. ; The Miami Project to Cure Paralysis, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, 1095 Northwest 14th Terrace, Miami, FL33136, USA. ; Spinal Cord Injury Center, Heidelberg University Hospital, Schlierbacher Landstr. 200A, 69118 Heidelberg, Germany. ; Institute for Neuropathology, RWTH Aachen University, Steinbergweg 20, 52074, Aachen, Germany. Julich-Aachen Research Alliance-Translational Brain Medicine. ; Institute of Reconstructive Neurobiology, Life&Brain Center, University of Bonn and Hertie Foundation, Sigmund-Freud-Strasse 25, 53127 Bonn, Germany. ; Departments of Pathology, Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Miami School of Medicine, Miami, FL 33101, USA. ; Axonal Growth and Regeneration, German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases, Ludwig-Erhard-Allee 2, 53175 Bonn, Germany. frank.bradke@dzne.de.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25765066" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Axons/*drug effects/physiology ; Cell Movement/drug effects ; Cell Polarity/drug effects ; Cicatrix/pathology/*prevention & control ; Epothilones/*administration & dosage ; Fibroblasts/drug effects/pathology ; Humans ; Meninges/drug effects/pathology ; Motor Activity/drug effects ; Nerve Regeneration/*drug effects ; Neurons/drug effects/pathology ; Rats ; Spinal Cord Injuries/*drug therapy/pathology/physiopathology ; Tubulin Modulators/*administration & dosage
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  • 29
    Publication Date: 2015-02-28
    Description: Polycomb and Trithorax group proteins encode the epigenetic memory of cellular positional identity by establishing inheritable domains of repressive and active chromatin within the Hox clusters. Here we demonstrate that the CCCTC-binding factor (CTCF) functions to insulate these adjacent yet antagonistic chromatin domains during embryonic stem cell differentiation into cervical motor neurons. Deletion of CTCF binding sites within the Hox clusters results in the expansion of active chromatin into the repressive domain. CTCF functions as an insulator by organizing Hox clusters into spatially disjoint domains. Ablation of CTCF binding disrupts topological boundaries such that caudal Hox genes leave the repressed domain and become subject to transcriptional activation. Hence, CTCF is required to insulate facultative heterochromatin from impinging euchromatin to produce discrete positional identities.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4428148/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4428148/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Narendra, Varun -- Rocha, Pedro P -- An, Disi -- Raviram, Ramya -- Skok, Jane A -- Mazzoni, Esteban O -- Reinberg, Danny -- GM-64844/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- GM086852/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- GM112192/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- P30 CA016087/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01 GM086852/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- R01 GM112192/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- R01 HD079682/HD/NICHD NIH HHS/ -- R01HD079682/HD/NICHD NIH HHS/ -- R37-37120/PHS HHS/ -- T32 GM007238/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- Howard Hughes Medical Institute/ -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2015 Feb 27;347(6225):1017-21. doi: 10.1126/science.1262088.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Chevy Chase, MD 20815, USA. Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Pharmacology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY 10016, USA. ; Department of Pathology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY 10016, USA. ; Department of Biology, New York University, New York, NY 10003, USA. ; Department of Biology, New York University, New York, NY 10003, USA. danny.reinberg@nyumc.org eom204@nyu.edu. ; Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Chevy Chase, MD 20815, USA. Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Pharmacology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY 10016, USA. danny.reinberg@nyumc.org eom204@nyu.edu.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25722416" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Cell Differentiation/*genetics ; Chromatin/chemistry/genetics/*metabolism ; Dogs ; Embryonic Stem Cells/*cytology ; *Gene Expression Regulation ; *Genes, Homeobox ; Humans ; Mice ; Motor Neurons/*cytology ; Multigene Family ; Neck ; Protein Structure, Tertiary ; Rats ; Repressor Proteins/chemistry/genetics/*metabolism
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  • 30
    Publication Date: 2015-03-15
    Description: Wireless deep brain stimulation of well-defined neuronal populations could facilitate the study of intact brain circuits and the treatment of neurological disorders. Here, we demonstrate minimally invasive and remote neural excitation through the activation of the heat-sensitive capsaicin receptor TRPV1 by magnetic nanoparticles. When exposed to alternating magnetic fields, the nanoparticles dissipate heat generated by hysteresis, triggering widespread and reversible firing of TRPV1(+) neurons. Wireless magnetothermal stimulation in the ventral tegmental area of mice evoked excitation in subpopulations of neurons in the targeted brain region and in structures receiving excitatory projections. The nanoparticles persisted in the brain for over a month, allowing for chronic stimulation without the need for implants and connectors.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Chen, Ritchie -- Romero, Gabriela -- Christiansen, Michael G -- Mohr, Alan -- Anikeeva, Polina -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2015 Mar 27;347(6229):1477-80. doi: 10.1126/science.1261821. Epub 2015 Mar 12.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA. Research Laboratory of Electronics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA. ; Research Laboratory of Electronics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA. ; Department of Chemical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA. ; Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA. Research Laboratory of Electronics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA. anikeeva@mit.edu.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25765068" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Action Potentials ; Animals ; Deep Brain Stimulation/*methods ; Evoked Potentials ; HEK293 Cells ; Humans ; *Magnetite Nanoparticles ; Male ; Mice ; Mice, Inbred C57BL ; Neurons/physiology ; Rats ; TRPV Cation Channels/agonists ; Ventral Tegmental Area/physiology ; *Wireless Technology
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  • 31
    Publication Date: 2015-05-02
    Description: The hippocampus computes diverse information involving spatial memory, anxiety, or reward and directly projects to several brain areas. Are different computations transmitted to all downstream targets uniformly, or does the hippocampus selectively route information according to content and target region? By recording from ventral hippocampal CA1 neurons in rats during different behavioral tasks and determining axonal projections with optogenetics, we observed subsets of neurons changing firing at places of elevated anxiety or changing activity during goal approach. Anxiety-related firing was selectively increased in neurons projecting to the prefrontal cortex. Goal-directed firing was most prominent in neurons targeting the nucleus accumbens; and triple-projecting neurons, targeting the prefrontal cortex, amygdala, and nucleus accumbens, were most active during tasks and sharp wave/ripples. Thus, hippocampal neurons route distinct behavior-contingent information selectively to different target areas.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Ciocchi, S -- Passecker, J -- Malagon-Vina, H -- Mikus, N -- Klausberger, T -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2015 May 1;348(6234):560-3. doi: 10.1126/science.aaa3245.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Center for Brain Research, Department for Cognitive Neurobiology, Medical University Vienna, Spitalgasse 4, 1090 Vienna, Austria. stephane.ciocchi@meduniwien.ac.at thomas.klausberger@meduniwien.ac.at. ; Center for Brain Research, Department for Cognitive Neurobiology, Medical University Vienna, Spitalgasse 4, 1090 Vienna, Austria. ; Center for Brain Research, Department for Cognitive Neurobiology, Medical University Vienna, Spitalgasse 4, 1090 Vienna, Austria. Medical Research Council, Anatomical Neuropharmacology Unit, Oxford University, Mansfield Road, Oxford OX1 3TH, UK. stephane.ciocchi@meduniwien.ac.at thomas.klausberger@meduniwien.ac.at.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25931556" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Anxiety/physiopathology ; CA1 Region, Hippocampal/*physiology ; Cell Communication ; Male ; Mental Processes/*physiology ; Neurons/physiology ; Nucleus Accumbens/physiology ; Optogenetics ; Prefrontal Cortex/physiology ; Rats ; Rats, Inbred LEC ; *Spatial Learning
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  • 32
    Publication Date: 2014-05-31
    Description: Synaptic vesicle recycling has long served as a model for the general mechanisms of cellular trafficking. We used an integrative approach, combining quantitative immunoblotting and mass spectrometry to determine protein numbers; electron microscopy to measure organelle numbers, sizes, and positions; and super-resolution fluorescence microscopy to localize the proteins. Using these data, we generated a three-dimensional model of an "average" synapse, displaying 300,000 proteins in atomic detail. The copy numbers of proteins involved in the same step of synaptic vesicle recycling correlated closely. In contrast, copy numbers varied over more than three orders of magnitude between steps, from about 150 copies for the endosomal fusion proteins to more than 20,000 for the exocytotic ones.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Wilhelm, Benjamin G -- Mandad, Sunit -- Truckenbrodt, Sven -- Krohnert, Katharina -- Schafer, Christina -- Rammner, Burkhard -- Koo, Seong Joo -- Classen, Gala A -- Krauss, Michael -- Haucke, Volker -- Urlaub, Henning -- Rizzoli, Silvio O -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2014 May 30;344(6187):1023-8. doi: 10.1126/science.1252884.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Neuro- and Sensory Physiology, University of Gottingen Medical Center, European Neuroscience Institute, Cluster of Excellence Nanoscale Microscopy and Molecular Physiology of the Brain, Gottingen, Germany. International Max Planck Research School Neurosciences, 37077 Gottingen, Germany. ; Bioanalytical Mass Spectrometry Group, Max-Planck-Institute for Biophysical Chemistry, 37077 Gottingen, Germany. ; Department of Neuro- and Sensory Physiology, University of Gottingen Medical Center, European Neuroscience Institute, Cluster of Excellence Nanoscale Microscopy and Molecular Physiology of the Brain, Gottingen, Germany. International Max Planck Research School Molecular Biology, 37077 Gottingen, Germany. ; Department of Neuro- and Sensory Physiology, University of Gottingen Medical Center, European Neuroscience Institute, Cluster of Excellence Nanoscale Microscopy and Molecular Physiology of the Brain, Gottingen, Germany. ; Leibniz Institut fur Molekulare Pharmakologie, Department of Molecular Pharmacology and Cell Biology, Robert-Rossle-Strasse 10, 13125 Berlin, Germany. ; Bioanalytical Mass Spectrometry Group, Max-Planck-Institute for Biophysical Chemistry, 37077 Gottingen, Germany. Bioanalytics, Department of Clinical Chemistry, University Medical Center Gottingen, 37075 Gottingen, Germany. ; Department of Neuro- and Sensory Physiology, University of Gottingen Medical Center, European Neuroscience Institute, Cluster of Excellence Nanoscale Microscopy and Molecular Physiology of the Brain, Gottingen, Germany. srizzol@gwdg.de.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24876496" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Brain/*metabolism/ultrastructure ; Exocytosis ; Imaging, Three-Dimensional ; Immunoblotting/methods ; Mass Spectrometry/methods ; Microscopy, Electron/methods ; Models, Neurological ; Presynaptic Terminals/chemistry/*metabolism/ultrastructure ; Protein Transport ; Rats ; Rats, Wistar ; Synaptic Vesicles/chemistry/*metabolism ; Synaptosomes/chemistry/*metabolism/ultrastructure ; Vesicular Transport Proteins/analysis/*metabolism
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  • 33
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    Unknown
    American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS)
    Publication Date: 2014-03-15
    Description: 〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Pennisi, Elizabeth -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2014 Mar 14;343(6176):1194-7. doi: 10.1126/science.343.6176.1194.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24626911" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Bacteria ; Beetles ; Cough/microbiology ; Humans ; Plant Leaves ; Rats ; Skin ; Sneezing ; Surface Tension ; Viruses ; Water/*chemistry ; *Wettability
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 34
    Publication Date: 2014-08-12
    Description: Ionotropic glutamate receptors (iGluRs) mediate most excitatory neurotransmission in the central nervous system and function by opening their ion channel in response to binding of agonist glutamate. Here, we report a structure of a homotetrameric rat GluA2 receptor in complex with partial agonist (S)-5-nitrowillardiine. Comparison of this structure with the closed-state structure in complex with competitive antagonist ZK 200775 suggests conformational changes that occur during iGluR gating. Guided by the structures, we engineered disulfide cross-links to probe domain interactions that are important for iGluR gating events. The combination of structural information, kinetic modeling, and biochemical and electrophysiological experiments provides insight into the mechanism of iGluR gating.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4383034/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4383034/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Yelshanskaya, Maria V -- Li, Minfen -- Sobolevsky, Alexander I -- NS083660/NS/NINDS NIH HHS/ -- P41 GM103403/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- P41 GM111244/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- R01 NS083660/NS/NINDS NIH HHS/ -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2014 Aug 29;345(6200):1070-4. doi: 10.1126/science.1256508. Epub 2014 Aug 7.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biophysics, Columbia University, 650 West 168th Street, New York, NY 10032, USA. ; Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biophysics, Columbia University, 650 West 168th Street, New York, NY 10032, USA. as4005@columbia.edu.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25103407" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Cross-Linking Reagents/chemistry ; Crystallography, X-Ray ; Cysteine/chemistry ; Glutamic Acid/pharmacology ; HEK293 Cells ; Humans ; *Ion Channel Gating ; Models, Chemical ; Organophosphonates/chemistry/pharmacology ; Protein Structure, Secondary ; Protein Structure, Tertiary ; Pyrimidinones/*pharmacology ; Quinoxalines/chemistry/pharmacology ; Rats ; Receptors, AMPA/*agonists/*chemistry/genetics
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  • 35
    Publication Date: 2014-03-29
    Description: The field of optogenetics uses channelrhodopsins (ChRs) for light-induced neuronal activation. However, optimized tools for cellular inhibition at moderate light levels are lacking. We found that replacement of E90 in the central gate of ChR with positively charged residues produces chloride-conducting ChRs (ChloCs) with only negligible cation conductance. Molecular dynamics modeling unveiled that a high-affinity Cl(-)-binding site had been generated near the gate. Stabilizing the open state dramatically increased the operational light sensitivity of expressing cells (slow ChloC). In CA1 pyramidal cells, ChloCs completely inhibited action potentials triggered by depolarizing current injections or synaptic stimulation. Thus, by inverting the charge of the selectivity filter, we have created a class of directly light-gated anion channels that can be used to block neuronal output in a fully reversible fashion.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Wietek, Jonas -- Wiegert, J Simon -- Adeishvili, Nona -- Schneider, Franziska -- Watanabe, Hiroshi -- Tsunoda, Satoshi P -- Vogt, Arend -- Elstner, Marcus -- Oertner, Thomas G -- Hegemann, Peter -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2014 Apr 25;344(6182):409-12. doi: 10.1126/science.1249375. Epub 2014 Mar 27.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Institute for Biology, Experimental Biophysics, Humboldt Universitat zu Berlin, D-10115 Berlin, Germany.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24674867" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Action Potentials ; Animals ; Binding Sites ; CA1 Region, Hippocampal/cytology ; Chloride Channels/*chemistry/*metabolism ; Chlorides/*metabolism ; HEK293 Cells ; Humans ; Hydrogen Bonding ; Ion Channel Gating ; Light ; Models, Molecular ; Molecular Dynamics Simulation ; Mutation ; Patch-Clamp Techniques ; Protein Conformation ; Protein Engineering ; Pyramidal Cells/metabolism ; Rats ; Recombinant Fusion Proteins/chemistry ; Rhodopsin/*chemistry/genetics/*metabolism ; Transfection
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  • 36
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    American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS)
    Publication Date: 2014-01-18
    Description: 〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Pennisi, Elizabeth -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2014 Jan 17;343(6168):239. doi: 10.1126/science.343.6168.239.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24436399" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Ants/*microbiology/physiology ; Brain/metabolism/microbiology ; Fat Body/virology ; Female ; Gryllidae/physiology/*virology ; Guanidines/analysis/metabolism ; *Host-Pathogen Interactions ; Hypocreales/*physiology ; Insect Viruses/*physiology ; Lizards/virology ; Male ; Rats ; Sexual Behavior, Animal/*physiology ; Sphingosine/analysis/metabolism ; Virus Replication
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  • 37
    Publication Date: 2014-04-26
    Description: Using light to silence electrical activity in targeted cells is a major goal of optogenetics. Available optogenetic proteins that directly move ions to achieve silencing are inefficient, pumping only a single ion per photon across the cell membrane rather than allowing many ions per photon to flow through a channel pore. Building on high-resolution crystal-structure analysis, pore vestibule modeling, and structure-guided protein engineering, we designed and characterized a class of channelrhodopsins (originally cation-conducting) converted into chloride-conducting anion channels. These tools enable fast optical inhibition of action potentials and can be engineered to display step-function kinetics for stable inhibition, outlasting light pulses and for orders-of-magnitude-greater light sensitivity of inhibited cells. The resulting family of proteins defines an approach to more physiological, efficient, and sensitive optogenetic inhibition.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4096039/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4096039/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Berndt, Andre -- Lee, Soo Yeun -- Ramakrishnan, Charu -- Deisseroth, Karl -- R01 DA020794/DA/NIDA NIH HHS/ -- R01 MH075957/MH/NIMH NIH HHS/ -- R01 MH086373/MH/NIMH NIH HHS/ -- Howard Hughes Medical Institute/ -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2014 Apr 25;344(6182):420-4. doi: 10.1126/science.1252367.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Bioengineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24763591" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Action Potentials ; Amino Acid Sequence ; Animals ; CA1 Region, Hippocampal/cytology ; CA3 Region, Hippocampal/cytology ; Chloride Channels/*chemistry/*metabolism ; Chlorides/*metabolism ; HEK293 Cells ; Humans ; Light ; Molecular Sequence Data ; Mutagenesis, Site-Directed ; Neurons/*physiology ; Optogenetics ; Patch-Clamp Techniques ; Protein Engineering ; Rats ; Rats, Sprague-Dawley ; Recombinant Fusion Proteins/chemistry/metabolism ; Rhodopsin/*chemistry/genetics/*metabolism
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  • 38
    Publication Date: 2014-01-25
    Description: Little is known about how microcircuits are organized in layer 2 of the medial entorhinal cortex. We visualized principal cell microcircuits and determined cellular theta-rhythmicity in freely moving rats. Non-dentate-projecting, calbindin-positive pyramidal cells bundled dendrites together and formed patches arranged in a hexagonal grid aligned to layer 1 axons, parasubiculum, and cholinergic inputs. Calbindin-negative, dentate-gyrus-projecting stellate cells were distributed across layer 2 but avoided centers of calbindin-positive patches. Cholinergic drive sustained theta-rhythmicity, which was twofold stronger in pyramidal than in stellate neurons. Theta-rhythmicity was cell-type-specific but not distributed as expected from cell-intrinsic properties. Layer 2 divides into a weakly theta-locked stellate cell lattice and spatiotemporally highly organized pyramidal grid. It needs to be assessed how these two distinct principal cell networks contribute to grid cell activity.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Ray, Saikat -- Naumann, Robert -- Burgalossi, Andrea -- Tang, Qiusong -- Schmidt, Helene -- Brecht, Michael -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2014 Feb 21;343(6173):891-6. doi: 10.1126/science.1243028. Epub 2014 Jan 23.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Bernstein Center for Computational Neuroscience, Humboldt University of Berlin, Philippstrasse 13 Haus 6, 10115 Berlin, Germany.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24457213" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Acetylcholine/metabolism ; Animals ; Calbindins/analysis/metabolism ; Dendrites/physiology ; Dentate Gyrus/physiology ; Entorhinal Cortex/*cytology/metabolism/physiology ; Female ; Male ; *Nerve Net ; Pyramidal Cells/metabolism/*physiology/*ultrastructure ; Rats ; Rats, Wistar ; Staining and Labeling ; *Theta Rhythm
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  • 39
    Publication Date: 2014-05-17
    Description: Neural circuits are shaped by elimination of early-formed redundant synapses during postnatal development. Retrograde signaling from postsynaptic cells regulates synapse elimination. In this work, we identified semaphorins, a family of versatile cell recognition molecules, as retrograde signals for elimination of redundant climbing fiber to Purkinje cell synapses in developing mouse cerebellum. Knockdown of Sema3A, a secreted semaphorin, in Purkinje cells or its receptor in climbing fibers accelerated synapse elimination during postnatal day 8 (P8) to P18. Conversely, knockdown of Sema7A, a membrane-anchored semaphorin, in Purkinje cells or either of its two receptors in climbing fibers impaired synapse elimination after P15. The effect of Sema7A involves signaling by metabotropic glutamate receptor 1, a canonical pathway for climbing fiber synapse elimination. These findings define how semaphorins retrogradely regulate multiple processes of synapse elimination.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Uesaka, Naofumi -- Uchigashima, Motokazu -- Mikuni, Takayasu -- Nakazawa, Takanobu -- Nakao, Harumi -- Hirai, Hirokazu -- Aiba, Atsu -- Watanabe, Masahiko -- Kano, Masanobu -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2014 May 30;344(6187):1020-3. doi: 10.1126/science.1252514. Epub 2014 May 15.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Neurophysiology, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-0033, Japan. ; Department of Anatomy, Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, Sapporo 060-8638, Japan. ; Laboratory of Animal Resources, Center for Disease Biology and Integrated Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-0033, Japan. ; Department of Neurophysiology, Gunma University Graduate School of Medicine, Maebashi, Gunma 371-8511, Japan. ; Department of Neurophysiology, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-0033, Japan. mkano-tky@m.u-tokyo.ac.jp.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24831527" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Antigens, CD/genetics/*metabolism ; Brain/*growth & development/metabolism ; Gene Knockdown Techniques ; Mice ; Mice, Inbred C57BL ; Purkinje Cells/metabolism/*physiology ; RNA Interference ; Rats ; Rats, Sprague-Dawley ; Receptors, Metabotropic Glutamate/genetics/metabolism ; Semaphorin-3A/genetics/*metabolism ; Semaphorins/genetics/*metabolism ; Signal Transduction ; Synapses/genetics/*physiology
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  • 40
    Publication Date: 2014-07-19
    Description: Cytoplasmic dynein is a molecular motor that transports a large variety of cargoes (e.g., organelles, messenger RNAs, and viruses) along microtubules over long intracellular distances. The dynactin protein complex is important for dynein activity in vivo, but its precise role has been unclear. Here, we found that purified mammalian dynein did not move processively on microtubules in vitro. However, when dynein formed a complex with dynactin and one of four different cargo-specific adapter proteins, the motor became ultraprocessive, moving for distances similar to those of native cargoes in living cells. Thus, we propose that dynein is largely inactive in the cytoplasm and that a variety of adapter proteins activate processive motility by linking dynactin to dynein only when the motor is bound to its proper cargo.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4224444/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4224444/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉McKenney, Richard J -- Huynh, Walter -- Tanenbaum, Marvin E -- Bhabha, Gira -- Vale, Ronald D -- F32GM096484/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- R01 GM097312/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- R01GM097312/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- Howard Hughes Medical Institute/ -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2014 Jul 18;345(6194):337-41. doi: 10.1126/science.1254198. Epub 2014 Jun 19.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Cellular and Molecular Pharmacology and the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, University of California, San Francisco, CA 94158, USA. ; Department of Cellular and Molecular Pharmacology and the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, University of California, San Francisco, CA 94158, USA. vale@ucsf.edu.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25035494" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Adaptor Proteins, Signal Transducing/*metabolism ; Animals ; Cytoplasmic Dyneins/chemistry/*metabolism ; Humans ; Mice ; Microtubule-Associated Proteins/*metabolism ; Microtubules/chemistry/*metabolism ; Motion ; Protein Transport ; Rats
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  • 41