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  • C67  (3)
  • Dutch  (3)
  • 1
    Publication Date: 2018-09-21
    Description: This paper is an annual publication issued by the Microeconomic Analysis service of the National Bank of Belgium. The Flemish maritime ports (Antwerp, Ghent, Ostend, Zeebrugge), the Autonomous Port of Liège and the port of Brussels play a major role in their respective regional economies and in the Belgian economy, not only in terms of industrial activity but also as intermodal centres facilitating the commodity flow. This update paper1 provides an extensive overview of the economic importance and development of the Flemish maritime ports, the Liège port complex and the port of Brussels in the period 2001 - 2006, with an emphasis on 2006. The port of Brussels has been included in the analysis for the first time. Focusing on the three major variables of value added, employment and investment, the report also provides some information about the financial situation in each port except for Brussels. These observations are linked to a more general context, along with a few cargo statistics. Annual accounts data from the Central Balance Sheet Office were used for the calculation of direct effects, the study of financial ratios and the analysis of the social balance sheet. The indirect effects of the activities concerned were estimated in terms of value added and employment, on the basis of data from the National Accounts Institute. In terms of quantity of cargo handled, 2006 was an excellent year for the Flemish maritime ports as a whole, driven by the world trade expansion. Direct value added rose in all Flemish port, except for Antwerp. Direct employment also increased, mainly in the maritime branches as a result of seaborne traffic growth. Investment on the other hand, took a downward plunge after the exceptionally high amounts in 2005. This was mainly due to a number of shipping companies and - to a lesser extent - the completion of the Deurganckdok in Antwerp. The current changes in world trade patterns have a substantial impact on the activities in the Flemish ports. To cope with the accelerating internationalisation of port competition and the tremendous growth of containerised seaborne transport, the ports need to constantly adapt their infrastructures, through innovation and investment. As major logistic centres, they have to face the challenge of responding to increasing demand in terms of capacity, while adding as much value as possible to the goods passing through them. To face this challenge, they try to focus on particular branches or aspects for which they believe they hold all the winning cards. This has become absolutely vital in a climate of growing regional and international competition, accentuated by the booming Asian economies. All figures indicate that the situation is improving for the port of Liège. The growth of value added, investment and quantity of cargo handled exceeds last year's figures. Employment still decreases but to a lesser extent. Moreover, the future is looking even brighter as the TriLogiPort project should begin to make progress, the blast furnace 6 of Arcelor in Seraing has been reopened, a new bioethanol plant is being built in Wanze and several works developing the infrastructure are being carried out. The last few years, the quantity of cargo handled at the port of Brussels has stabilised. In terms of land available for port related activities, the port of Brussels has reached its limits. As a result, the extension of the infrastructure is one of the main priorities, all the more because the port authority has set ambitious goals for the near future. The present report provides a comprehensive account of these issues, giving details per economic sector, though the comments are confined to the main changes that occurred in 2006.
    Keywords: C67 ; H57 ; J21 ; L22 ; L91 ; L92 ; R15 ; R34 ; R41 ; ddc:330 ; branch survey ; maritime cluster ; subcontracting ; indirect effects ; transport intermodality ; public investments.
    Repository Name: EconStor: OA server of the German National Library of Economics - Leibniz Information Centre for Economics
    Language: Dutch
    Type: doc-type:workingPaper
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  • 2
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    Brussels: National Bank of Belgium
    Publication Date: 2018-09-21
    Description: The Flemish maritime ports play a major role in the Belgian economy, not only in terms of the industries they encompass but also as intermodal centres where transhipment activities are concentrated. This update1 paper provides an extensive overview of the economic importance and development of the Flemish maritime ports, through revised results for the period 1997 - 2003. Focusing on the three major variables of value added, employment and investment, it also provides some information about the financial situation of a few vital sectors in each port. A global indication concerning the financial health of the companies studied is also provided, using the NBB bankruptcy prediction model. In addition, it includes figures with respect to the ongoing growth of several cargo traffic segments and provides an overall picture of social developments in the Flemish maritime ports. The indirect effects of these port activities are estimated in terms of value added and employment. Annual account data from the Central Balance Sheet Office were used for the calculation of direct effects, the study of financial ratios and the analysis of the social balance sheet. The indirect effects were estimated on the basis of data from the National Accounts Institute. In the Flemish maritime ports, direct VA came to almost 11.5 billion euro and total VA - the sum of direct and indirect VA - to 22 billion euro in 2003. In the same year direct and total employment reached respectively 105,000 and 239,000 full-time equivalents, while direct investment reached 2.5 billion euro. The ongoing developments in the maritime ports sector in the Hamburg - Le Havre range continue to affect the port operations: concentration of capital, privatisation of port logistic services, expansion and dispersion of foreign trade, internationalisation of production and consumption patterns, increase in containerised shipments, etc. Production, trade and transport are no longer considered as individual and isolated activities, but are integrated within a single system, while economies of scale continue. Therefore, ports are becoming real logistic centres: ports able to add value to the goods passing through the port area have a major advantage in a climate of increasing international competition. Flemish ports are following this trend, and that is also reflected in the analysis presented in this report.
    Keywords: C67 ; H57 ; J21 ; L22 ; L91 ; L92 ; R15 ; R34 ; R41 ; ddc:330 ; branch survey ; maritime cluster ; subcontracting ; indirect effects ; transport intermodality ; public investments. ; Hafen ; Branchenentwicklung ; Flandern ; Wirkungsanalyse
    Repository Name: EconStor: OA server of the German National Library of Economics - Leibniz Information Centre for Economics
    Language: Dutch
    Type: doc-type:workingPaper
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  • 3
    facet.materialart.
    Unknown
    Brussels: National Bank of Belgium
    Publication Date: 2018-09-21
    Description: This paper provides an extensive overview of the economic importance and evolution of the car manufacturing industry. In addition, it provides evidence that the car industry is still playing a vital role in process innovation. The currently widespread lean production method, under which companies focus on their core activities and develop a network of subcontractors, in fact originates from the Japanese car industry. The introduction of the "lean production" concept in Europe had a far-reaching impact on corporate relations. Important responsibilities - such as product development, quality control, innovation efforts and timely deliveries - have been/are passed on to the subcontractors. Company clusters have been formed, which often also have consequences in terms of geographical location due to the necessity of "just-in-time" or even "just-in-sequence"-deliveries. The mere fact that global companies have implemented this production method, also adds to the internationalization of the subcontracting companies. The latter conclusion fuelled/fuels the trend to anchor as it were the industrial core activities through an appropriate policy. Such a policy must be based upon reliable statistical observations. A major disadvantage, however, is that because of their network structure, the corporate clusters' importance is hard to measure. Since the input-output tables are not available for the very latest years, on the one hand, and are not sufficiently detailed, on the other hand, a method has been searched for which allows to gauge the importance of a specific branch. In this paper the method will be applied to the car manufacturing in Belgium. The proposed calculation method is based on the supply and use tables drawn up by the Bank within the framework of the National Accounts Institute.
    Keywords: C67 ; J21 ; L22 ; L62 ; R15 ; R34 ; ddc:330 ; branch survey ; car industry ; subcontracting ; indirect effects ; Kfz-Industrie ; Lean Production ; Just in Time ; Internationale Arbeitsteilung ; Multinationales Unternehmen ; Belgien
    Repository Name: EconStor: OA server of the German National Library of Economics - Leibniz Information Centre for Economics
    Language: Dutch
    Type: doc-type:workingPaper
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