ALBERT

All Library Books, journals and Electronic Records Telegrafenberg

Your email was sent successfully. Check your inbox.

An error occurred while sending the email. Please try again.

Proceed reservation?

Export
Filter
  • Other Sources  (397)
  • Articles (OceanRep)  (397)
  • Springer Nature  (265)
  • ASLO (Association for the Sciences of Limnology and Oceanography)  (131)
  • American Meteorological Society
Collection
  • Other Sources  (397)
Source
  • Articles (OceanRep)  (397)
Publisher
  • 1
    Publication Date: 2018-08-14
    Description: Bacterial productivity and biomass are thought to be limited by dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in much of the world’s oceans. However, the mixed layer of oligotrophic oceans is often depleted in dissolved inorganic nitrogen and phosphate, raising the possibility that macronutrients may also limit heterotrophic bacterial growth. We used nutrient bioassay experiments to determine whether inorganic nutrients (N, P, Fe) and/or DOC could limit bacterial productivity and biomass in the central North Atlantic during the spring of 2004 (Mar–Apr). We observed that both heterotrophic bacterial productivity and biomass were co-limited by N and P in the oligotrophic North Atlantic, and additions of labile DOC (glucose) provided no stimulation unless N and P were also added. Flow cytometry results indicated that only a small subset of large cells high in nucleic acid content were responsible for the increased productivity in the combined NP amendments. In contrast, nutrient additions elicited no net change on the dominant component of the bacterial population, composed of small cells with relatively low nucleic acid content. In the combined NP treatments the relative increase in bacterial production was greater than that measured when phytoplankton productivity was relieved of nitrogen limitation. These results suggest that N and P co-limitation in the bacterial community results in increased competition between the heterotrophic and autotrophic components of the surface communities in the Central North Atlantic Ocean, and potentially impacts the cycling of organic matter by the bacterioplankton.
    Type: Article , PeerReviewed
    Format: text
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 2
    facet.materialart.
    Unknown
    ASLO (Association for the Sciences of Limnology and Oceanography)
    In:  Limnology and Oceanography, 48 . pp. 55-67.
    Publication Date: 2014-01-30
    Description: Carbon acquisition in relation to CO2 supply was investigated in three marine bloom-forming microalgae, the diatom Skeletonema costatum, the flagellate Phaeocystis globosa, and the coccolithophorid Emiliania huxleyi. In vivo activities of extracellular (eCA) and intracellular (iCA) carbonic anhydrase activity, photosynthetic O2 evolution, CO2 and HCO uptake rates were measured by membrane inlet mass spectrometry in cells acclimated to pCO2 levels of 36, 180, 360, and 1,800 ppmv. Large differences were obtained between species both with regard to the efficiency and regulation of carbon acquisition. While eCA activity increased with decreasing CO2 concentration in S. costatum and P. globosa, consistently low values were obtained for E. huxleyi. No clear trends with pCO2 were observed in iCA activity for any of the species tested. Half saturation concentrations (K1/2) for photosynthetic O2 evolution, which were highest for E. huxleyi and lowest for S. costatum, generally decreased with decreasing CO2 concentration. In contrast, K1/2 values for P. globosa remained unaffected by pCO2 of the incubation. CO2 and HCO3- were taken up simultaneously by all species. The relative contribution of HCO3- to total carbon uptake generally increased with decreasing CO2, yet strongly differed between species. Whereas K1/2 for CO2 and HCO3- uptake was lowest at the lowest pCO2 for S. costatum and E. huxleyi, it did not change as a function of pCO2 in P. globosa. The observed taxon-specific differences in CO2 sensitivity, if representative for the natural environment, suggest that changes in CO2 availability may influence phytoplankton species succession and distribution. By modifying the relative contribution of different functional groups, e.g., diatomaceous versus calcareous phytoplankton, to the overall primary production this could potentially affect marine biogeochemical cycling and air-sea gas exchange.
    Type: Article , PeerReviewed
    Format: text
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 3
    facet.materialart.
    Unknown
    ASLO (Association for the Sciences of Limnology and Oceanography)
    In:  Limnology and Oceanography, 54 (1). pp. 262-275.
    Publication Date: 2017-05-02
    Description: To examine the grazing effects of copepod-dominated mesozooplankton on heterotrophic microbial communities, four mesocosm experiments using gradients of zooplankton abundance were carried out at a coastal marine site. The responses of different protist groups (nanoflagellates, ciliates) and bacterioplankton in terms of abundance and additionally, for bacteria, diversity, production, and exoenzymatic activity, were monitored during 1 week of incubation. Independent of the initial experimental abiotic conditions and the dominating copepod species, zooplankton caused order-of-magnitude changes in microbial functional groups in a clear community-wide four-link trophic cascade. The strongest predatory effects were observed for protist concentrations, thus generating inverse relationships between mesozooplankton and ciliates and between ciliates and nanoplankton. Copepod grazing effects propagated even further, not only reducing the abundance, production, and hydrolytic activity of bacterioplankton but also increasing bacterial diversity. The overall strength of this trophic cascade was dampened with respect to bacterial numbers, but more pronounced with respect to bacterial diversity and activity. High predation pressure by heterotrophic nanoflagellates, realized at the highest copepod abundance, was probably the underlying mechanism for these structural changes in the bacterial assemblages. Our results thus suggest a mechanism by which changes in higher trophic levels of marine plankton indirectly affect prokaryotic assemblages and microbially mediated ecosystem functions.
    Type: Article , PeerReviewed
    Format: text
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 4
    Publication Date: 2019-09-23
    Description: In recent studies the Sr/Ca ratio of coccolithophore calcite was used as a proxy for past coccolithophore growth and calcification rates. Since Sr and Ca concentrations in seawater have not remained constant through time, interpretation of Sr/Ca data from the coccolith-dominated sedimentary record requires knowledge about the incorporation of seawater Sr into coccolith calcite during coccolithogenesis. Here we show that Sr/Ca of Emiliania huxleyi coccoliths is linearly related to seawater Sr/Ca, meaning that the Sr exchange coefficient does not change with changing seawater Sr/Ca. The exchange coefficient for Sr in this study, 0.39, is close to values presented in the literature and is high compared with values obtained by inorganic precipitation experiments. This suggests a strong effect of cell physiology on biogenic calcite precipitation in coccolithophores. We present a conceptual model, based on the transmembrane transport of Sr and Ca, which explains the offset.
    Type: Article , PeerReviewed
    Format: text
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 5
    facet.materialart.
    Unknown
    ASLO (Association for the Sciences of Limnology and Oceanography)
    In:  Limnology and Oceanography, 48 (1). pp. 179-188.
    Publication Date: 2014-01-30
    Description: The uptake and efflux of 64Cu was studied in the marine cyanobacterium Synechoccous strain WH7803 (DC2). Uptake followed classical Michaelis-Menten type kinetics in metal-buffered seawater. The maximum uptake rate, Vmax, was 0.236 ± 0.016 × 10-18 mol Cu cell-1 h-1, with the half-saturation constant, KS, of 10-10.81±0.11 mol L-1. An efflux mechanism was also observed in WH7803, whose growth was inhibited by high internal Cu concentrations. Efflux of Cu enabled WH7803 to maintain homeostasis for Cu at typical seawater ambient free copper concentrations ([Cu2+]f). The sensitivity of WH7803 growth to Cu was related to a simple inability to regulate internal Cu concentrations when external concentrations were 〉10-11 mol L-1.
    Type: Article , PeerReviewed
    Format: text
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 6
    facet.materialart.
    Unknown
    ASLO (Association for the Sciences of Limnology and Oceanography)
    In:  Limnology and Oceanography, 46 . pp. 964-970.
    Publication Date: 2014-01-30
    Description: Redfield ratios of remineralization are calculated based on chemical data analysis on isopycnal surfaces. The concentrations of dissolved inorganic carbon used in this study were corrected for the anthropogenic CO2 content as estimated with a back-calculation technique. The corrections increased the apparent carbon remineralization by 25-30%, thus proving important for the reliable estimation of Redfield carbon ratios in the presence of anthropogenic CO2. Best estimates from this study largely confirm the more recently published Redfield ratios of remineralization. The following results were obtained for the latitude range 3-41°N along 20-29°W in the Northeast Atlantic Ocean: Corg: P ratio = 123 ± 10; Corg : N ratio = 7.2 ± 0.8; -O2 :Corg ratio = 1.34 ± 0.06; -O2 : P ratio = 165 ± 15; N: P ratio = 17.5 ± 2.0. These ratios are in close agreement with the average composition of phytoplankton and represent respiration of organic matter consisting on average of 52% protein, 36% polysaccharide, and 12% lipid.
    Type: Article , PeerReviewed
    Format: text
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 7
    facet.materialart.
    Unknown
    ASLO (Association for the Sciences of Limnology and Oceanography)
    In:  Limnology and Oceanography, 42 . pp. 1660-1672.
    Publication Date: 2014-01-30
    Description: Diatoms have evolved a multitude of morphologics, including highly elongated cells and cell chains. Elongation and chain formation have many possible functions, such as grazing protecticn or effects on sinking. Here, a model of diffusive and advective nutrient transport is used to predict impacts of cell shape and chain length on potential nutrient supply and uptake in a turbulent environment. Rigid, contiguous, prolate spheroids thereby represent the shapes of simple chains and solitary cells. At scales larger than a few centimeters, turbulent water motions produce a more or less homogeneous nutrient distribution. At the much smaller stall: of diatom cells, however, turbulence drcates a roughly linear shear and nutrients can locally become strongly dl=pleted because of nutrient uptake by phytoplankton cells. The potential diffusive nutrient supply is greater for elongated than for spherically shaped cells of similar volume but lower for chains than for solitary cells. Although the relative increase in nutrient transport due to turbulence is greater for chains, single cells still enjoy a greater total nutrient supply in turbulent cnvironmerits. Only chains with specialized structures, such as spaces between the cells, can overcome this disadvantage and even obtain a higher nutrient supply than do solitary cells. The mod=1 results are compared to laboratory measurements of nutrient uptake under turbulent conditions and to effects ol’ sinking
    Type: Article , PeerReviewed
    Format: text
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 8
    facet.materialart.
    Unknown
    ASLO (Association for the Sciences of Limnology and Oceanography)
    In:  Limnology and Oceanography, 52 . pp. 2062-2071.
    Publication Date: 2019-09-23
    Description: We investigated whether nutrient limitations of primary producers act upward through food webs only in terms of density effects or if there is a second pathway for nutrient limitation signals channelled upward to higher trophic levels. We used tritrophic food chains to assess the effects of nutrient-limited phytoplankters (the cryptophyte Rhodomonas salina) on herbivorous zooplankters (the calanoid copepod Acartia tonsa) and finally zooplanktivores (larval herring Clupea harengus) living on the herbivores. The primary producers� food quality had a significant effect on fish condition. Our experimental phosphorus-limited food chain resulted in larval fish with a significantly poorer condition than their counterparts reared under nitrogen-limited or nutrient-sufficient conditions. Our results show that mineral nutrient requirements of consumers have to be satisfied first before fatty acids can promote further growth. This challenges the match/mismatch hypothesis, which links larval fish survival probability solely to prey availability, and could imply that reduced nutrient releases into the environment may affect fish stocks even more severely than previously believed.
    Type: Article , PeerReviewed
    Format: text
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 9
    facet.materialart.
    Unknown
    ASLO (Association for the Sciences of Limnology and Oceanography)
    In:  Limnology and Oceanography, 51 (3). pp. 1217-1229.
    Publication Date: 2018-08-14
    Description: During the European Iron Fertilisation Experiment (EIFEX), performed in the Southern Ocean, we investigated the reactions of different phytoplankton size classes to iron fertilization, applying measurements of size fractionated pigments, particulate organic matter, microscopy, and flow cytometry. Chlorophyll a (Chl a) concentrations at 20-m depth increased more than fivefold following fertilization through day 26, while concentrations of particulate organic carbon (POC), nitrogen (PON), and phosphorus (POP) roughly doubled through day 29. Concentrations of Chl a and particulate organic matter decreased toward the end of the experiment, indicating the demise of the iron-induced phytoplankton bloom. Despite a decrease in total diatom biomass at the end of the experiment, biogenic particulate silicate (bPSi) concentrations increased steadily due to a relative increase of heavily silicified diatoms. Although diatoms 〉 20 mu m were the main beneficiaries of iron fertilization, the growth of small diatoms (2-8 mu m) was also enhanced, leading to a shift from a haptophyte- to a diatom-dominated community in this size fraction. The total biomass had lower than Redfield C : N, N : P, and C : P ratios but did not show significant trends after iron fertilization. This concealed various alterations in the elemental composition of the different size fractions. The microplankton 20 mu m) showed decreasing C : N and increasing N : P and C : P ratios, possibly caused by increased N uptake and the consumption of cellular P pools. The nanoplankton (2-20 mu m) showed almost constant C : N and decreasing N : P and C : P ratios. Our results suggest that the latter is caused by a shift in composition of taxonomic groups.
    Type: Article , PeerReviewed
    Format: text
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 10
    facet.materialart.
    Unknown
    ASLO (Association for the Sciences of Limnology and Oceanography)
    In:  Limnology and Oceanography, 46 . pp. 749-757.
    Publication Date: 2018-06-25
    Description: In contrast to most pelagic primary producers, benthic macrophytes pass through morphologically distinct life stages, which can be subject to different ecological controls. Using factorial field experiments, we investigated how grazing pressure (three levels) and nutrient supply (four levels) interact in controlling the passage of marine macroalgae through an apparent recruitment bottleneck at the germling stage. In comparative experiments, we asked whether relative bottom-up and top-down effects on early life stages (〈4 week germlings) vary (1) between the eutrophic Baltic Sea and the oligotrophic NW Atlantic, (2) across seasons in the NW Atlantic, and (3) among annual and perennial macroalgae. In both systems nutrient enrichment favored and grazers suppressed recruitment of green and brown annual algae; however, enrichment effects were much more pronounced in the Baltic, whereas grazer effects dominated in the NW Atlantic. Grazers induced a shift from grazer-susceptible green to more resistant brown algae in the Baltic without reducing total germling density. In the NW Atlantic, grazers strongly reduced overall recruitment rate throughout all seasons. Effects on perennials were similar in both systems with moderate losses to grazing and no effects of nutrient enrichment. Recruit densities and species composition shifted with season in the NW Atlantic. We conclude that the relative effects of grazers and nutrient enrichment depended on the nutrient status of the system, algal life history strategy, and season. Strong bottom-up and top-down controls shape benthic community composition before macroalgae reach visible size
    Type: Article , PeerReviewed
    Format: text
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
Close ⊗
This website uses cookies and the analysis tool Matomo. More information can be found here...