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  • 1995-1999  (141)
  • 1997  (141)
  • 1
    ISSN: 0749-503X
    Keywords: Saccharomyces cerevisiae ; chromosome VII ; genome sequencing ; ribosomal protein ; serine/threonine protein kinase ; transcriptional regulatory protein ; Life and Medical Sciences ; Genetics
    Source: Wiley InterScience Backfile Collection 1832-2000
    Topics: Biology
    Notes: The nucleotide sequence of a 40·5 kb DNA fragment from the left arm of chromosome VII of Saccharomyces cerevisiae was determined and analysed. Twenty-eight open reading frames (ORFs) longer than 300 nucleotides were identified. Eight of them correspond to the following known yeast genes: EMP24, GCN1, SPO8, COX13, CDC55, RPS26, COX4 and LSR1, also called GTS1. Twelve ORFs are new, among them eight show homology with other genes while four have no homology with any sequence in the databases. Eight additional ORFs are internal to or partially overlapping with other ORFs. The nucleotide sequence reported here is deposited in the EMBL database under the Accession Numbers X91837 and X91489. © 1997 by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
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  • 2
    ISSN: 0749-503X
    Keywords: glycogen ; phosphatase type 1 ; targeting ; PIG1 ; PIG2 ; Life and Medical Sciences ; Genetics
    Source: Wiley InterScience Backfile Collection 1832-2000
    Topics: Biology
    Notes: The biosynthesis of glycogen involves multiple proteins that associate with each other and the glycogen macromolecule. In efforts to understand the nature of these proteins, a two-hybrid screen was undertaken to detect proteins able to interact with Gsy2p, a major form of glycogen synthase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Two positives expressed proteins derived from genes designated PIG1 and PIG2, on chromosomes XIIR and IXL respectively. PIG1 codes for a protein with 38% identity over a 230 residue segment to Gac1p, a protein thought to be a type 1 protein phosphatase targeting subunit whose loss impairs glycogen synthesis. Pig2p has 30% identity to the protein corresponding to an open reading frame, YER054, on chromosome V. Deletion of PIG1 on its own had little effect on glycogen storage but, in combination with loss of GAC1, caused a more severe glycogen-deficient phenotype than seen in gac1 mutants. This result is consistent with Pig1p being functionally related to Gac1p and we propose that Pig1p may be a type 1 phosphatase regulatory subunit. Delection of PIG2, YER054, or both genes together caused no detectable change in glycogen metabolism under the conditions tested. Gac1p, Pig1p, Pig2p and the YER054p are the only four proteins coded by the yeast genome that share a conserved segment of ∼25 residues, designated the GVNK motif, that is identifiable also in RGI, the mammalian type 1 phosphatase targeting subunit. © 1997 by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
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  • 3
    ISSN: 0749-503X
    Keywords: yeast ; Saccharomyces cerevisiae ; chromosome IV ; genomic sequencing ; SIT4/PPH1 ; FAD1 ; NAM1/MTF2 ; RNA11 ; SIR2/MAR1 ; NAT1/AAA1 ; PRP9 ; ACT2 ; MPS1/RPK1 ; Life and Medical Sciences ; Genetics
    Source: Wiley InterScience Backfile Collection 1832-2000
    Topics: Biology
    Notes: A 36 688 bp fragment from the left arm of chromosome IV of Saccharomyces cerevisiae was sequenced. Sequence analysis identified 20 complete non-overlapping open reading frames (ORFs) of at least 100 amino acids. Nine of these correspond to previously identified and sequenced genes: SIT4/PPH1, FAD1, NAM1/MTF2, RNA11, SIR2/MAR1, NAT1/AAA1, PRP9, ACT2 and MPS1/RPK1. Three ORFs show homology to previously sequenced genes. One ORF exhibits a hypothetical yabO/yceC/yfiI family signature and one has the ATP-dependent helicase signature of the DEAD and DEAH box families. Six ORFs show no appreciable homology to any proteins in the database. One of these is identical to yeast expressed sequence tags and therefore corresponds to an expressed gene. In addition, two partial ORFs and 11 ORFs that are totally internal and are not likely to be functional were detected. The sequence has been submitted to the EMBL data library under Accession Number Z71781. © 1997 by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
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  • 4
    ISSN: 0749-503X
    Keywords: genome sequencing ; Saccharomyces cerevisiae ; chromosome XV ; ORFs ; predictable functions ; Life and Medical Sciences ; Genetics
    Source: Wiley InterScience Backfile Collection 1832-2000
    Topics: Biology
    Notes: We report the sequence of a 35 600 bp fragment covering the PET123 region on the right arm of chromosome XV from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This region contains 19 possible open reading frames (ORFs) of which 16 are non-overlapping ORFs. Eight ORFs correspond to the SPP2, SMP3, RPB2, PDR5, NFI1, PUP1, PET123 and MTR10 loci, described previously. Two ORFs correspond to yeast homologues of genes from other organisms: O3530 is a member of the large ribosomal subunit protein L13 family and O3560 (SME1 gene) is a 94-codon ORF and is a homologue of the mammalian SmE spliceosomal core protein. Three ORFs (O3513, O3521, O3548) present significant similarities to proteins of unknown function and three ORFs (O3510, O3536, O3545) lack homology to sequences within the databases screened. The sequence has been deposited in the GenBank database under Accession Number U55020. © 1997 by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
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  • 5
    ISSN: 0749-503X
    Keywords: Saccharomyces ; glucose transport ; SNF3 ; Life and Medical Sciences ; Genetics
    Source: Wiley InterScience Backfile Collection 1832-2000
    Topics: Biology
    Notes: The SNF3 protein, Snf3p, of Saccharomyces cerevisiae was initially thought to be a high affinity glucose transporter required for efficient catabolism of low glucose concentrations. We now report evidence suggesting that Snf3p is a regulatory protein and not a catabolic transporter. The C-terminal domain of Snf3p is able to complement the growth defect on solid media of snf3 null mutants independent of attachment to the membrane-spanning domains. However, the C-terminal domain is unable to fully restore high affinity glucose transport to a snf3 null strain. Examination of deletions of the C-terminal domain of intact SNF3 demonstrates that this region is required for both the growth and transport functions of Snf3p. Loss of the SNF3 gene leads to a long-term adaptation phenotype for cells grown in liquid medium at low substrate concentrations in the presence of the respiratory inhibitor, antimycin A. The presence of the C-terminal domain shortens the time required for adaptation in a snf3 null strain. Thus, Snf3p appears to affect ability to adapt to low substrate conditions, but does not confer an absolute defect in uptake of substrate. Taken together, these data suggest that Snf3p is a regulatory protein likely functioning in the detection of glucose. © 1997 by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
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  • 6
    ISSN: 0749-503X
    Keywords: GAL genes ; expression vector ; cytochrome P-450 ; Candida maltosa ; Life and Medical Sciences ; Genetics
    Source: Wiley InterScience Backfile Collection 1832-2000
    Topics: Biology
    Notes: The GAL1 and GAL10 gene cluster encoding the enzymes of galactose utilization was isolated from an asporogenic yeast, Candida maltosa. The structure of the gene cluster in which both genes were divergently transcribed from the central promoter region resembled those of some other yeasts. The expression of both genes was strongly induced by galactose and repressed by glucose in the medium. Galactose-inducible expression vectors in C. maltosa were constructed on low- and high-copy number plasmids using the promoter regions of both genes. With these vectors and the β-galactosidase gene from Kluyveromyces lactis as a reporter, galactose-inducible expression was confirmed. Homologous overexpression of members of the cytochrome P-450 gene family in C. maltosa was also successful by using a high-copy-number vector under the control of these promoters. © 1997 by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
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  • 7
    ISSN: 0749-503X
    Keywords: drug resistance ; transport ; yeast ; MFS ; Life and Medical Sciences ; Genetics
    Source: Wiley InterScience Backfile Collection 1832-2000
    Topics: Biology
    Notes: Screening of the complete genome sequence from the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae reveals that 28 open reading frames (ORFs) are homologous to each other and to established bacterial members of the drug-resistant subfamily of the major facilitator superfamily. The phylogenesis of these protein sequences shows that they fall into three major clusters. Cluster I contains 12 ORFs, cluster II contains ten ORFs and cluster III contains six ORFs. Hydropathy analyses indicate that in clusters II and III ORFs, 14 transmembrane spans are predicted whereas only 12 transmembrane spans are predicted in cluster I ORFs.Three ORFs that have known functions as multidrug-resistance pumps in other yeast species such as Schizosaccharomyces pombe (CAR1), Candida albicans (BMRP) or C. maltosa (CYHR), also fall into cluster I. Two S. cerevisiae ORFs of known multidrug-resistance function (ATR1, SGE1) fall into cluster II. Cluster III consists exclusively of ORFs of unknown function but binary sequence comparisons show homology to ORFs from cluster II.Analysis of the multiple alignment for these proteins leads to the identification of characteristic signature sequences for each of the three clusters. © 1997 by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
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  • 8
    ISSN: 0749-503X
    Keywords: genome sequencing ; Saccharomyces cerevisiae ; TAFII60 ; YB88 ; G4p1 ; glucose transport ; Life and Medical Sciences ; Genetics
    Source: Wiley InterScience Backfile Collection 1832-2000
    Topics: Biology
    Notes: We report the nucleotide sequence of a DNA fragment of 12 325 base pairs from the left arm of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae chromosome VII. Inspection of the coding capacity revealed 11 open reading frames (ORFs) longer than 100 amino acids. Five ORFs are significantly homologous to known proteins. The region encoding ORF G2985 corresponds (100%) to the gene encoding the yeast TATA binding protein-associated factor TAFII60. The G3075 ORF is 47·8% identical to the hypothetical yeast protein YB88. G3080 shows 36·7% identity to the eel calmodulin. G3085 shows 94·9% identity with the published sequence of the quadruplex DNA binding protein G4p1. G3090 reveals 46·7% identity with the probable glucose transport protein yBR1625. The DNA sequence has been submitted to the EMBL data library under Accession Number X97644. © 1997 by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
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  • 9
    ISSN: 0749-503X
    Keywords: yeast ; genome project ; chromosome IV ; GDH ; SHR3 ; UGA4 ; NHP2 ; HEM3 ; MGT1 ; SHM1 ; ASF2 ; Gly-tRNA ; Life and Medical Sciences ; Genetics
    Source: Wiley InterScience Backfile Collection 1832-2000
    Topics: Biology
    Notes: The complete nucleotide sequence of a 39 090 bp segment from the left arm of yeast chromosome IV was determined. Twenty-one open reading frames (ORFs) longer than 100 amino acids and a Gly-tRNA gene were discovered. Nine of the 21 ORFs (D0892, D1022, D1037, D1045, D1057, D1204, D1209, D1214, D1219) correspond to the previously sequenced Saccharomyces cerevisiae genes for the NAD-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH), the secretory component (SHR3), the GABA transport protein (UGA4), the high mobility group-like protein (NHP2), the hydroxymethylbilane synthase (HEM3), the methylated DNA protein-cysteine S-methyltransferase (MGT1), a putative sugar transport protein, the Shm1 protein (SHM1) and the anti-silencing protein (ASF2). The inferred amino acid sequences of 11 ORFs show significant similarity with known proteins from various organisms, whereas the remaining ORF does not share any similarity with known proteins. The nucleotide sequence has been entered in the EMBL data Library under the Accession Number X99000.©1997 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
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  • 10
    ISSN: 0749-503X
    Keywords: RAD14 ; nucleotide excision repair ; Saccharomyces cerevisiae ; damage recognition ; XPA homologue ; Life and Medical Sciences ; Genetics
    Source: Wiley InterScience Backfile Collection 1832-2000
    Topics: Biology
    Notes: The RAD14 gene of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is required for the incision step of the nucleotide excision repair process. The Rad14 protein can bind zinc, possesses a potential zinc finger DNA binding domain and has been shown to bind specifically to damaged DNA. Differences in UV sensitivity exist between a rad14 deletion strain and a putative rad14 point mutant, the point mutant being more resistant to UV than the deletion strain. Here, we confirm that the rad14 deletion strain repairs neither UV-induced cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs) nor endonuclease III-sensitive damage sites, whereas the point mutant cannot repair the former but can repair the latter. From this it can be inferred that the point mutant produces an altered protein product allowing recognition of endonuclease III sensitive sites but not CPDs. To investigate this, the rad14 mutant allele was sequenced. It contained two GC-AT transition mutations when compared to the wild-type RAD14 gene sequence. When the rad14 point mutant sequence is translated, alterations within the putative zinc finger binding domain are observed, with one of the cysteine residues of the zinc binding motif being replaced by tyrosine. This suggests that alterations within the zinc finger binding domain of the Rad14 protein cause changes to the damage recognition properties of the protein. The use of the Rad14 protein from the point mutant should assist in experiments investigating the in vitro binding properties of the Rad14 protein to different types of DNA damage. © 1997 by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
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