ALBERT

All Library Books, journals and Electronic Records Telegrafenberg

Your email was sent successfully. Check your inbox.

An error occurred while sending the email. Please try again.

Proceed reservation?

Proceed order?

Last 14 Days Catalog Additions

Export
  • 1
    Series available for loan
    Series available for loan
    Hanover, NH : U.S. Army Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory
    Associated volumes
    Call number: ZSP-201-80/9
    In: CRREL Report, 80-9
    Description / Table of Contents: Explosive cratering tests were conducted in seasonally frozen and thawed gravel at Ft. Richardson near Anchorage, Alaska, and in seasonallly frozen and thawed silt overlying permafrost and in silt permafrost at Ft. Wainwright near Fairbanks, Alaska. Explosive charge weights ranged from 26 to 3120 lb and charge burial depths ranged from about 3 to 40 ft. The cube root of the charge weight scaling was used to determine maximum scaled crater dimensions and optimum scaled depth of burial of the charge. Test results for frozen and thawed gravel were essentially the same because of the low moisture content and the relatively shallow depth of freezing (5 to 6 ft). The optimum depth of burial of the charge for maximizing the apparent radius and depth and the true radius was about 1.8 times the cube root of the charge weight for both the frozen and thawed conditions. In seasonally frozen silt overlying a talik and silt permafrost the maximum scaled crater dimensions and optimum scaled burial depths of the charge were smaller than for the thawed condition except for the true crater dimensions. The channeling of energy in the talik produces maximum crater dimensions and an optimum burial depth for the true crater that is larger than for the thawed condition. The results for the homogeneous silt permafrost were very similar to the frozen gravel results with much smaller maximum crater dimensions and smaller optimum charge burial depths than for the thawed silt overlying permafrost.
    Type of Medium: Series available for loan
    Pages: v, 21 Seiten , Illustrationen
    Series Statement: CRREL Report 80-9
    Language: English
    Note: CONTENTS Abstract Preface Metric conversion table Introduction Test sites Test procedures and materials Analysis of test data Mobility tests Conclusions Literature cited
    Location: AWI Archive
    Branch Library: AWI Library
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 2
    Call number: ZSP-201-80/8
    In: CRREL Report, 80-8
    Description / Table of Contents: This report presents the results of the tests on the new U.S. Coast Guard 140-ft icebreaker Katmai Bay (WTGB-101) in the level plate ice and brash ice in Whitefish Bay and the St. Marys River. The results indicate that the vessel can penetrate 22 in. of level freshwater ice with 2-3 in. of snow cover. It can also penetrate up to 48 in. of brash ice in a continuous mode and at least 30 in. of plate ice by backing and ramming. The installed bubbler system decreased the required power of the vessel from 10 to 30% in brash ice and 25 to 35% in level ice. The low friction coating appears to be effective in decreasing the friction factor when it remains intact; when it peels off it appears to make conditions worse than plain paint. An average dynamic friction factor of 0.15 could be used over the entire hull for these tests.
    Type of Medium: Series available for loan
    Pages: iv, 28 Seiten , Illustrationen
    Series Statement: CRREL Report 80-8
    Language: English
    Note: CONTENTS Abstract Preface Metric conversion table Introduction Roughness and friction measurements Level plate ice performance Brash ice performance Ramming icebreaking performance Analysis of the data Propulsion efficiency in ice Regression analysis Conclusions and recommendations Literature cited
    Location: AWI Reading room
    Branch Library: AWI Library
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 3
    Call number: ZSP-201-80/10
    In: CRREL Report, 80-10
    Description / Table of Contents: A mathematical model of coupled heat and moisture flow in soils has been developed. The model includes algorithms for phase change of soil moisture and frost heave and permits several types of boundary and initial conditions. The finite element method of weighted residual (Galerkin procedure) was chosen to simulate the spatial regime and the Crank-Nicholson method was used for the time domain portion of the model. To facilitate evaluation of the model, the heat and moisture fluxes were essentially decoupled; moisture flux was then simulated accurately, as were heat flux and frost heave in a laboratory test. Comparison of the simulated and experimental data illustrates the importance of unsaturated hydraulic conductivity. It is one parameter which is difficult to measure and for which only a few laboratory test results are available. Therefore, unsaturated hydraulic conductivities calculated in the computer model may be a significant source of error in calculations of frost heave. The algorithm incorporating effects of surcharge and overburden was inconclusively evaluated. Time-dependent frost penetration and frost heave in laboratory specimens were closely simulated with the model. After 10 days of simulation, the computed frost heave was about 2.3 cm vs 2.0 cm and 2.8 cm in two tests. Frost penetration was computed as 15 cm and was measured at 12.0 cm and 12.2 cm in the two laboratory samples after 10 days.
    Type of Medium: Series available for loan
    Pages: v, 49 Seiten , Illustrationen
    Series Statement: CRREL Report 80-10
    Language: English
    Note: CONTENTS Abstract Preface Introduction One-dimensional equations of simultaneous heat and moisture flux Moisture transport Heat transport Phase change Coupling effects Frost heave algorithm Development of computer model Finite difference vs finite element method Finite element formulation Time domain solution Evaluation of the mathematical model Heat flux Moisture flux Numerical dispersion Frost heave of homogeneous laboratory samples Conclusions Recommended studies to refine the model Literature cited Appendix A. Work plan, staffing and instrumentation requirements for correlating results oflaboratory frost susceptibility tests with field performance Appendix B. Proposed investigation of thaw weakening of subgrade soil and granular unboundbase course Appendix C. Derivation of finite element system matrices
    Location: AWI Archive
    Branch Library: AWI Library
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 4
    Call number: AWI Bio-20-93994
    Type of Medium: Dissertations
    Pages: viii, 140 Seiten , Illustrationen, Diagramme
    Language: English
    Note: Dissertation, Universität Potsdam, 2017 , Table of Contents I. Abstract II. Deutsche Zusammenfassung 0 Challenge 1 Introduction 1.1 The treeline ecotone 1.2 Stand structure drivers in the treeline ecotone 1.3 Climate change and recent treeline changes 1.4 Methods for treeline studies 1.4.1 Overview 1.4.2 Field-based treeline studies 1.4.3 Modelling treeline dynamics 1.5 Study Area 1.6 The Siberian treeline ecotone 1.7 Larix as study Species 1.8 Objectives of this thesis 1.9 Thesis outline 1.10 Contribution of the authors 1.10.1 Manuscript!- published 1.10.2 Manuscript II - submitted 1.10.3 Manuscript III-in preparation 1.10.4 Manuscript IV-submitted 2 Manuscript I Treeline dynamics in Siberia under changing climates as inferred from an individual-based model for Larix 2.1 Abstract 2.2 Introduction 2.3 Materials and Methods 2.3.1 Reference sites 2.3.2 Description of the model LAVESI 2.3.3 The ODD-Protocol for LAVESI 2.3.4 Parameterization 2.3.5 Khatanga climate time-series 2.3.6 Sensitivity analysis 2.3.7 Model experiments 2.4 Results 2.4.1 Sensitivity analysis 2.4.2 Taymyr treeline application 2.4.3 Temperature experiments 2.5 Discussion 2.5.1 Assessment of LAVESI sensitivity 2.5.2 Larix stand simulation under the Taymyr Peninsula weather 2.5.3 Transient Larix response to hypothetical future temperature changes 2.5.4 Conclusions 2.6 Acknowledgements 3 Manuscript II Dissimilar responses of larch stands in northern Siberia to increasing temperatures - a field and simulation based study 3.1 Abstract 3.2 Introduction 3.3 Methods 3.3.1 Study area 3.3.2 Field-based approach 3.3.3 Age analyses 3.3.4 Stand structure analyses 3.3.5 Seed analyses 3.3.6 Establishment history 3.3.7 Modelling approach 3.4 Results 3.4.1 Field data 3.4.2 Simulation study 3.5 Discussion 3.5.1 Data acquisition 3.5.2 Larch-stand patterns across the Siberian treeline ecotone 3.5.3 Warming causes densification in the forest-tundra 3.5.4 Intra-specific competition inhibits densification in the closed forest 3.5.5 Recruitment limitation decelerates densification and northward expansion ofthe single-tree tundra 3.6 Conclusions 3.7 Acknowledgements 4 Manuscript III Spatial patterns and growth sensitivity of larch stands in the Taimyr Depression 4.1 Abstract 4.2 Introduction 4.3 Methods 4.3.1 Study Area 4.3.2 Field data collection 4.3.3 Spatial point patterns 4.3.4 Dendrological approach 4.4 Results 4.4.1 Spatial patterns 4.4.2 Tree growth 4.5 Discussion 4.5.1 Spatial patterns 4.5.2 Tree chronology characteristics 4.6 Conclusion 5 Manuscript IV Patterns of larch stands under different disturbance regimes in the lower Kolyma River area (Russian Far East) 5.1 Abstract 5.2 Introduction 5.3 Methods 5.3.1 Study area and field data collection 5.3.2 Site description 5.3.3 Dendrochronological approach 5.3.4 Statistical analyses 5.4 Results 5.4.1 General stand characteristics and age structure 5.4.2 Spatial patterns 5.5 Discussion 5.5.1 Fire related disturbances 5.5.2 Water-related disturbances: lake drainage, flooding, polygon development 5.5.3 Implications and conclusion 6 Synthesis and Discussion 6.1 Assessment of applied methods 6.1.1 Field-based observations: 6.1.2 Modelling 6.2 Overview of larch stand structures and spatial pattern on different spatial scales 6.2.1 Recent stand structures 6.2.2 Spatial Patterns 6.3 Stand structure drivers and treeline changes 6.3.1 Climate change 6.3.2 Disturbances 6.3.3 Autecology 6.4 Conclusion 6.5 Outlook 7 Appendix 7.1 Supplementary information for Manuscript I 7.2 Supplementary information for Manuscript II 7.2.1 Manuscript II: Appendix 1. Climatic information for the study region 7.2.2 Manuscript II: Appendix 2. Plot-specific values and krummholz appearance 7.2.3 Manuscript II: Appendix 3. Regression analysis for age data 7.2.4 Manuscript II: Appendix 4. Model description 7.3 Supplementary information for Manuscript III 7.4 Supplementary information for Manuscript IV 7.5 Supplementary information 8 References Danksagung Eidesstattliche Erklärung
    Location: AWI Reading room
    Branch Library: AWI Library
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 5
    Call number: AWI Bio-20-93993
    Type of Medium: Dissertations
    Pages: III, 127 Seiten , Illustrationen
    Language: English
    Note: Dissertation, Universität Potsdam, 2014 , Table of contents I - Abstract II - Zusammenfassung Chapter 1 - Introduction 1.1. Introduction 1.1.1 Motivation 1.1.2 Organisation of thesis 1.1 Scientific background 1.2.1 Arctic and wetland bryophytes 1.2.2 Bryophyte remains as palaeo-environmental indicators 1.2.3 Regional setting 1.3 Objectives ofthe thesis 1.4 Overview of the manuscripts 1.5 Contribution of the authors Chapter 2 - Manuscript #1 Abstract 2.1 Introduction 2.2 Geographic setting 2.3 Materials and methods 2.3.1 Fieldwork 2.3.2 Radiocarbon dating 2.3.3 Geochemical, stable carbon isotope, and granulometric analyses 2.3.4 Analyses of moss remains and vascular plant macrofossils 2.3.5 Pollen analysis 2.3.6 Diatom analysis 2.3.7 Statistical analysis 2.4 Results 2.4.1 High-resolution spatial characteristics oft the investigated polygon and vegetation pattern 2.4.2 Geochronology and age-depth relationships 2.4.3 General properties of the sedimentary fill 2.4.4 Bioindicators 2.4.5 Characterization oftwo different types of polygon pond sediment 2.5. Discussion 2.5.1 Small-scale spatial structure of polygons 2.5.2 Age-depth relationships 2.5.3 Proxy value of the analysed parameters 2.5.4 The general polygon development 2.5.5 Polygon development as a function of external controls and internal adjustment mechanisms 2.6 Conclusions Chapter 3 - Manuscript #11 Abstract 3.1 Introduction 3.2 Material und methods 3.2.1 Regional setting 3.2.3 Field methods and environmental data collection 3.2.4 Data analysis 3.3 Results 3.3.1 Major characteristics of the investigated polygons 3.3.2 Vegetation cover and its relationships with micro-relief and vegetation type 3.3.3 Vegetation alpha-diversity and its relationship with micro-relief and vegetation type 3.3.4 Vegetation composition and its relationship with micro-relief and vegetation type 3.4 Discussion 3.4.1 Patterns of cover, alpha-diversity and compositional turnover of vascular plants and bryophytes along the rim-pond transect (local-scale) 3.4.2 Patterns of cover, alpha-diversity and compositional turnover of vascular plants and bryophytes along the regional-scale forest-tundra transect 3.4.3 Indicator potential ofvascular plant and bryophyte remains from polygonal peats for the reconstruction of local hydrological and regional vegetation changes 3.4.4. Implications of the performed vegetation transect studies for future Arctic warming 3.5 Acknowledgements 2.4.4 Bioindicators 2.4.5 Characterization of two different types of polygon pond sediment 2.5. Discussion 2.5.1 Small-scale spatial structure of polygons 2.5.2 Age-depth relationships 2.5.3 Proxy value of the analysed parameters 2.5.4 The general polygon development 2.5.5 Polygon development as a function of external controls and internal adjustment mechanisms 2.6 Conclusions Chapter 3 - Manuscript #II Abstract 3.1 Introduction 3.2 Material und methods 3.2.1 Regional setting 3.2.3 Field methods and environmental data collection 3.2.4 Data analysis 3.3 Results 3.3.1 Major characteristics of the investigated polygons 3.3.2 Vegetation cover and its relationships with micro-relief and vegetation type 3.3.3 Vegetation alpha-diversity and its relationship with micro-relief and vegetation type 3.3.4 Vegetation composition and its relationship with micro-relief and vegetation type 3.4 Discussion 3.4.1 Patterns of cover, alpha-diversity and compositional turnover of vascular plants and bryophytes along the rim-pond transect (local-scale) 3.4.2 Patterns of cover, alpha-diversity and compositional turnover of vascular plants and bryophytes along the regional-scale forest-tundra transect 3.4.3 Indicator potential of vascular plant and bryophyte remains from polygonal peats for the reconstruction of local hydrological and regional vegetation changes 3.4.4. Implications of the performed vegetation transect studies for future Arctic warming 3.5 Acknowledgements Chapter 4 - Manuscript #3 Abstract 4.1 Introduction 4.2 Material and methods 4.2.1 Sites 4.2.2 Sampling 4.2.3 Investigated moss species 4.2.4 Measurements 4.2.5 Statistical Tests 4.3 Results 4.4 Discussion Chapter 5 - Discussion 5.1 Bryophytes of polygonal landscapes in Siberia 5.1.1 Modern bryophytes in the Siberian Arctic 5.1.2 Biochemical and isotopic characteristics of mosses 5.1.3 Reliability and potential of fossil bryophyte remains as palaeoproxies 5.2 Dynamics of low-centred polygons during the late Holocene 5.3 Outlook Appendix I - Preliminary Report Motivation Material and methods Results and first interpretation Appendix II Additional tables and figures of manuscript #1 Appendix III Additional figures of manuscript #2 Appendix IV - Quantitative approach of Standard Moss Stem (SMS3) Bibliography Acknowledgements Eidesstattliche Erklärung
    Location: AWI Reading room
    Branch Library: AWI Library
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 6
    Call number: AWI Bio-20-93992
    Type of Medium: Dissertations
    Pages: XIII, 137 Seiten , Illustrationen, Diagramme , 1 CD-ROM
    Language: English
    Note: Dissertation, Universität Potsdam, 2017 , Content List of Abbreviations List of Figures List of Tables Summary Zusammenfassung Motivation Chapter 1 1. Scientific background 1.1 Late Quaternary climate changes and treeline transition in northern Siberia 1.2 Natural archives and proxies to assess vegetation history 1.3 Study area 1.3 Objectives of the thesis 1.4 Thesis outline 1.4.1 Chapters and manuscripts 1.4.2 Author's contribution 1.4.2.1 Manuscript I - published 1.4.2.2 Manuscript II - submitted 1.4.2.3 Manuscript III - prepared for submission Chapter 2 2. Manuscript I: Sedimentary ancient DNA and pollen reveal the composition of plant organic matter in Late Quaternary permafrost sediments of the Buor Khaya Peninsula (north-eastern Siberia) 2.1 Abstract 2.2 Introduction 2.3 Geographical settings 2.4 Material and methods 2.4.1 Core material 2.4.2 Subsampling of the permafrost core 2.4.3 Molecular genetic laboratory work 2.4.4 Analysis of sequence data and taxonomic assignments 2.4.5 Pollen sample treatment and analysis 2.4.6 Statistical analyses and visualization 2.5 Results 2.5.1 SedaDNA 2.5.1.1 SedaDNA of terrestrial plants 2.5.1.2 SedaDNA of swamp and aquatic plants 2.5.1.3 SedaDNA of bryophytes and algae 2.5.2 Pollen 2.5.2.1 Pollen of terrestrial plants 2.5.2.2 Pollen and spores of swamp and aquatic plants 2.5.2.3 Spores and algae 2.5.3 Ratios of terrestrial to swamp and aquatic taxa and Poaceae to Cyperaceae 2.6 Discussion 2.6.1 Quality and proxy value of sedaDNA and pollen data 2.6.2 Environmental conditions during the pre-LGM (54-51 kyr BP, 18.9-8.35 m) and composition of deposited organic matter 2.6.3 Environmental conditions during the post-LGM (11.4-9.7 kyr BP (13.4-11.1 cal kyr BP)) and composition of deposited organic matter 2.7 Conclusions 2.8 Acknowledgements Chapter 3 3. Manuscript II: Genetic variation of larches at the Siberian tundra-taiga ecotone inferred from the assembly of chloroplast genomes and mitochondrial sequences 3.1. Abstract 3.2. Introduction 3.3. Material and methods 3.3.1 Plant material 3.3.2 DNA isolation and sequencing 3.3.3 Sequence processing and de novo assembly 3.3.4 Chloroplast genome assembly, annotation and variant detection 3.3.5 Mitochondrial sequences 3.3.6 Analyses of genetic variation 3.4 Results 3.4.1 Chloroplast genome structure and genetic variation 3.4.2 Mitochondrial sequences and genetic variation 3.5 Discussion 3.5.1 De novo assembly and genetic variation of chloroplast genomes and mitochondrial sequences 3.5.2 The distribution of genetic variation at the tundra-taiga ecotone 3.6 Conclusions 3.7 Acknowledgements Chapter 4 4. Manuscript III: The history of tree and shrub taxa and past genetic variation of larches on Bol'shoy Lyakhovsky Island (New Siberian Archipelago) since the last interglacial uncovered by sedimentary ancient DNA 4.1 Abstract 4.2 Introduction 4.3 Materials and methods 4.3.1 Geographic setting 4.3.2 Core material 4.3.2.1 Core L14-02: Yedoma Ice Complex 4.3.2.2 Core L14-03: Thermo terrace 4.3.2.3 Core L14-04 and hand-pieces L14-04B and L14-04C: Thermo terrace including Eemian deposits 4.3.2.4 Core L14-05: Alas 4.3.3 Core sub-sampling 4.3.4 Molecular genetic laboratory work 4.3.4.1 Sedimentary ancient DNA metabarcoding approach 4.3.4.2 Specific amplification of Larix from sedimentary ancient DNA 4.3.5 Filtering of Illumina sequencing data and taxonomic assignments 4.3.6 Statistical analyses and visualization 4.3.7 Geochronology 4.4. Results 4.4.1 Overall composition of the DNA metabarcoding data 4.4.2 Terrestrial vegetation composition 4.4.2.1 Core L14-02: Late Pleistocene Yedoma Ice Complex 4.4.2.2 L14-03: Deeper late Pleistocene deposits 4.4.2.3 L14-04 Thermo terrace including Eemian deposits 4.4.2.4 Core L14-05: Alas with Holocene lake deposits and taberits of the Yedoma Ice Complex 4.4.2.5 The multivariate structure of the terrestrial vegetation among samples and cores 4.4.3 Genetic variation ofsediment-derived Larix sequences 4.5 Discussion 4.5.1 Tree taxa in the sedaDNA record - where do they come from? 4.5.2 Terrestrial plant community changes of warm phases since the last interglacial 4.5.3 Past genetic diversity of larch populations on Bol'shoy Lyakhovsky Island 4.6 Conclusion 4.7 Acknowledgements Chapter 5 5. Synopsis 5.1 The proxy potential of sedaDNA in paleobotanical reconstructions from sedimentary deposits 5.1.1 Combining sedaDNA and pollen to assess plant diversity and vegetation composition 5.1.2 Current limits and opportunities of sedaDNA approaches 5.2 Using genomic data to trace modern and past treeline dynamics 5.2.1 Modern genomic variation at the Siberian treeline 5.2.2 PCR-based markers for paleoenvironmental genetics 5.3 Terrestrial plant community changes and treeline dynamics in north-eastern Siberia since the last interglacial 5.3.1 Vegetation changes in north-eastern Siberia since the last interglacial 5.3.2 Implications for treeline dynamics 5.4 Conclusion 5.5 Outlook Appendix 1. Supplementary material for Manuscript I (Chapter 2) 2. Supplementary material for Manuscript II (Chapter 3) 3. Supplementary material for Manuscript III (Chapter 4) References Acknowledgements Erklärung
    Location: AWI Reading room
    Branch Library: AWI Library
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 7
    Monograph available for loan
    Monograph available for loan
    Abingdon : Routledge
    Call number: IASS 20.95232
    Description / Table of Contents: "With transitions to more sustainable ways of living already underway, this book examines how we understand the underlying dynamics of the transitions that are unfolding. Without this understanding, we enter the future in a state of informed bewilderment. Shedding light on the highly complex challenge of a sustainable and just transition, this book is essential reading for anyone concerned with establishing a more sustainable and equitable world. Ultimately, this is a book about hope, but without easy answers."
    Type of Medium: Monograph available for loan
    Pages: xii, 338 Seiten , Illustrationen , 25 cm
    ISBN: 9780367178154 , 9780367178161
    Series Statement: Routledge studies in sustainable development
    Language: English
    Branch Library: IASS Library
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 8
    Call number: AWI Bio-20-93988
    Type of Medium: Dissertations
    Pages: x, 181 Seiten , Illustrationen, Diagramme
    Language: English
    Note: Dissertation, Universität Potsdam, 2017 , Contents Abstract Kurzfassung Contents 1. List of figures 2. List of tables Chapter 1. General introduction 1. Motivation 2. Scientific background 3. Objectives of the thesis 4. Thesis outline Chapter 2. Manuscript 1: Treeline dynamics in Siberia under changing climates as inferred from an individual-based model for Larix 1. Abstract 2. Introduction 3. Material and Methods 4. Results 5. Discussion 6. Acknowledgements Chapter 3. Manuscript 2: Field and simulation data reveal dissimilar responses of Larix gmelinii stands to increasing temperature across the Siberian treeline ecotone 1. Abstract 2. Introduction 3. Methods 4. Results 5. Discussion 6. Acknowledgements Chapter 4. Manuscript 3: High gene flow and complex treeline dynamics on the Taymyr Peninsula (north-central Siberia), revealed by nuclear microsatellites of Larix 1. Abstract 2. Introduction 3. Materials and methods 4. Results 5. Discussion 6. Acknowledgements Chapter 5. Manuscript 4: Dispersal distances at treeline in Siberia - genetic guided model improvement 1. Abstract 2. Introduction 3. Methods 4. Results 5. Discussion 6. Acknowledgements Chapter 6. Synopsis 1. Towards a better understanding of Siberian treeline dynamics 2. Methodological challenges to reconstruct and predict the treeline advance 3. Conclusions 4. Outlook Appendix 1. Supplementary information for manuscript 1 (Chapter 2) 2. Supplementary information for manuscript 2 (Chapter 3) 3. Supplementary information for manuscript 3 (Chapter 4) 4. Supplementary information for manuscript 4 (Chapter 5) Bibliography Acknowledgements - Danksagung Declaration
    Location: AWI Reading room
    Branch Library: AWI Library
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 9
    Call number: AWI G5-20-93987
    Type of Medium: Dissertations
    Pages: XVI, 91 Seiten , Illustrationen
    Language: English
    Note: Dissertation, Universität Potsdam, 2015 , Table of Contents Acknowledgements Abstract Zusammenfassung List of figures and tables List of Abbreviations 1. Introduction 1.1. Preface and thesis organization 1.2. Research motivation and relevance 1.3. Background knowledge 1.3.1. Terrigenous sediments 1.3.2. Hala Lake 1.3.3. The North Pacific 1.3.4. The Bering Sea 1.4. Aims and objectives 1.5. Methodological overview 1.5.1. Fieldwork 1.5.2. Age-depth modeling 1.5.3. Key proxies: grain size and clay minerals 1.5.4. Supplementary methodology: remote sensing, seismic sub-bottom profiling and geochemistry 1.6. Overview and status of the manuscripts 2 Manuscript 1 : Linkages between Quaternary climate change and sedimentary processes in Hala Lake, northern Tibetan Plateau, China Abstract 2.1. Introduction 2.2. Regional setting 2.3. Materials and methods 2.3.1. Remote sensing of the study area 2.3.2. Fieldwork 2.3.3. Radiocarbon dating of recovered sediment cores 2.3.4. Laboratory work 2.3.5. Statistical data treatment 2.4. Results and interpretation 2.4.1. Remote sensing on the spatial heterogeneity of lake ice and length of lake ice-free days 2.4.2. Seismic sub-bottom profiling 2.4.3. Age and sedimentary characteristics of the sediment core record 2.4.4. Grain-size modeling results 2.5. Discussion 2.5.1. Last Glacial Maximum (~24-17 cal. ka BP) 2.5.2. Time-equivalent of Heinrich Event 1 (~17-15.4 cal. ka BP) 2.5.3. Time-equivalent of Bolling-Allerod (~15.4-13 cal. ka BP) 2.5.4. Time-equivalent of Younger Dryas (~12.9-11.6 cal. ka BP) 2.5.5. Holocene (~11.6 cal. ka BP to present) 2.6. Conclusions Acknowledgments 3 Manuscript 2: Modern modes of provenance and dispersal of terrigenous sediments in the North Pacific and the Bering Sea: Implications and perspectives for palaeoenvironmental reconstructions Abstract 3.1. Introduction 3.2. Study area and regional setting 3.3. Material and methods 3.4. Results 3.4.1. Grain size distribution 3.4.2 Bulk mineralogy 3.4.3. Mineralogy of the clay fraction 3.5. Discussion 3.5.1. Sedimentary processes 3.5.2. Sediment provenance 3.5.3 Implications for palaeoenvironmental studies 3.6. Conclusions Acknowledgements 4 Manuscript 3: Provenance and dispersal of terrigenous sediments in the Bering Sea slope: Implications for late glacial land-ocean linkages Abstract 4.1. Introduction 4.2. Regional setting 4.3. Material and methods 4.4. Results and interpretation 4.4.1. Lithology and stratigraphy 4.4.2. Grain size distribution 4.4.3. Clay mineralogy 4.5. Discussion 4.5.1. Processes of terrigenous sediment supply 4.5.2. Detrital sediment sources 4.5.3. Detrital sediment supply and its relation to regionalpalaeoenvironmental changes 4.5.3.1. Time interval 32-15.7 ka BP: Background sedimentation at low sea level 4.5.3.2. Time interval 15.7-14.5 ka BP: Regional Meltwater Pulse 4.5.3.3. Time interval 14.5-12.9 ka BP: First biological bloom event 4.5.3.4. Time interval 12.9-6 ka BP: Cooling episode, rejuvenation of biological productivity and onset ofmodern conditions 4.5.4. Palaeoenvironmental implications 4.6. Conclusions Acknowledgements 5 Synthesis 5.1. The North Hemisphere synchronization of millennial climate oscillations during the last Glacial: teleconnections from Westerlies and thermohaline Circulation 5.2. The regional asynchronization of millennial climate oscillations during the last Glacial: discrepancy and "recording capacity" 5.3. Secondary connections between global climate transmissions: winter cyclone in the North Pacific 5.4. Future perspectives 6 References 7 Appendix Extended results: Core SO202-39-3 from the mid-latitude North Pacific 7.1. Material 7.2. Results 7.3. Oscillation of eolian sediment transport 7.4. Conclusions
    Location: AWI Reading room
    Branch Library: AWI Library
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 10
    Call number: AWI G5-20-93989
    Type of Medium: Dissertations
    Pages: viii, 139 Seiten , Illustrationen, Diagramme
    Language: English
    Note: Dissertation, Universität Potsdam, 2018 , Table of Content I. Abstract II. Deutsche Zusammenfassung 0 Preface 1 Scientific Background 1.1 Paleoenvironmental changes since the gLGM in arid Central Asia and north-western High Asia 1.1.1 Paleoclimatic changes 1.1.2 Lake level fluctuations following climatic changes 1.1.3 Inferred terrestrial vegetation responses to environmental changes and possible human impact 1.2 The role of proxy records in tracing environmental changes 1.2.1 Archives and Proxies investigated in environmental studies in Central Asia 1.2.2 Limnological systems as environmental archives 1.2.3 The multiproxy approach as a tool to decipher environmental change 1.3 Study area 1.4 Material and Method Overview 1.4.1 Field based sampling 1.4.2 Outline of material and methods 1.5 Aim and objectives ofthis thesis 1.6 Thesis outline 1.7 Contribution of the authors 1.7.1 Manuscript I - published 1.7.2 Manuscript II - published 1.7.3 Manuscript III - published 1.7.4 Manuscript IV - in preparation 2 Manuscript I Climatic and limnological changes at Lake Karakul (Tajikistan) during the last ~29 cal ka 2.1 Abstract 2.2 Introduction 2.3 Study Area 2.4 Material and methods 2.4.1 Fieldwork 2.4.2 Laboratory analysis 2.5 Results 2.5.1 Age-depth relationship in core KK12-1 2.5.2 TIC, TOC, TOC/TN, δ18Ocarb and δ13CCarb 2.5.3 Grain-size distribution and results ofend-member modelling 2.5.4 XRF data 2.5.5 Ordination results of sediment parameters 2.6 Discussion 2.6.1 Paleoenvironmental indicators from sediment variables 2.6.2 Implications ofthe Lake Karakul sediment record 2.6.3 Linking lake internal development to climate change 2.7 Conclusions 2.8 Acknowledgements 2.9 Data availability 3 Manuscript II Aquatic macrophyte dynamics in Lake Karakul (Eastern Pamir) over the last 29 cal ka revealed by sedimentary ancient DNA and geochemical analyses of macrofossil remains 3.1 Abstract 3.2 Introduction 3.3 Material and Methods 3.3.1 Sample acquisition and treatment 3.3.2 Genetic approach 3.3.3 Elemental isotopic analyses ofaquatic macrophyte remains 3.4 Results 3.4.1 Macrophyte records along lake depth transects in Lake Karakul 3.4.2 Submerged plant content 3.4.3 Ancient DNA analyses 3.4.4 C, N, δ13C and δ15N of Stuckenia cf. pamirica remains 3.5 Discussion 3.5.1 Assessment of aDNA and chemical aquatic macrophyte data as proxies for the macrophyte composition and the paleo-productivity 3.5.2 Changes of past submerged plant composition and productivity and potential drivers 3.6 Conclusions 3.7 Acknowledgements 3.8 Data Availability 4 Manuscript III Radiocarbon and optical stimulated luminescence dating of sediments from Lake Karakul, Tajikistan 4.1 Abstract 4.2 Introduction 4.3 Regional setting 4.4 Methods 4.4.1 Collection and correlation of cores 4.4.2 Radiocarbon dating 4.4.3 Optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dating 4.4.4 Establishment ofage-depth model 4.4.5 Investigation of exposed lake sediments 4.5 Results 4.6 Discussion 4.6.1 Recovered sediments and correlation ofcores from Lake Karakul 4.6.2 Age-depth model, and assessment of radiocarbon and OSL age data 4.6.3 Significance ofexposed sediments at section KK13-S1 4.6.4 Implications ofthe chronological data 4.7 Conclusion 4.8 Acknowledgements 5 Manuscript IV Vegetation change in the Eastern Pamir Mountains inferred from Lake Karakul pollen spectra of the last 28 ka 5.1 Abstract 5.2 Introduction 5.3 Study site 5.4 Material and Methods 5.4.1 Sediment cores and chronology 5.4.2 Pollen sample preparation and pollen analyses 5.4.3 Pollen data treatment 5.5 Results 5.5.1 Composite core (KK12-1/2; 27.6 cal ka BP to present) 5.5.2 Short core TAJ-Kar-08-lB 5.6 Discussion 5.6.1 Interpretation of pollen data 5.6.2 Terrestrial vegetation change in the Eastern Pamir Mountains in response to past climate change 5.7 Conclusions 5.8 Acknowledgements 5.9 Data Availability 6 Synthesis 6.1 Proxy evaluation 6.1.1 Age-depth relationship 6.1.2 Limnological proxies 6.1.3 Terrestrial proxies 6.2 The potential of Lake Karakul as archive for long term environmental change in the Eastern Pamir 6.3 Climate and moisture availability changes over time - inferred from sedimentary proxies 6.4 Assessment ofthe aquatic macrophyte composition and paleoproductivity within Lake Karakul 6.5 Inferred terrestrial vegetation changes as responds to climatic changes over the last 28 cal ka 6.6 Comparison inferred regional vegetation, lake internal and lake external variations and changes in climate reconstructed in other studies 6.6.1 Pre- gLGM and global Last Glacial Maximum (27.6 to 19 cal ka BP) 6.6.2 Late glacial 6.6.3 Early to middle Holocene 6.6.4 Middle to late Holocene 6.7 Outlook 7 Appendix 7.1 Supplementary information for Manuscript I 7.2 Supplementary information for Manuscript II 7.3 Supplementary information for Manuscript III 8 References Danksagung Eldesstattliche Erklärung
    Location: AWI Reading room
    Branch Library: AWI Library
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
Close ⊗
This website uses cookies and the analysis tool Matomo. More information can be found here...