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  • 1
    Monograph available for loan
    Monograph available for loan
    Cheltenham, UK [u.a.] : Elgar
    Call number: IASS 20.94406
    Description / Table of Contents: enth.
    Type of Medium: Monograph available for loan
    Pages: XVIII, 521 S. : graph. Darst , Tab., graph. Darst.
    ISBN: 1858987164
    Series Statement: New horizons in the economics of innovation
    Language: English
    Branch Library: IASS Library
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  • 2
    Call number: M 22.94785
    Description / Table of Contents: The European continent features an impressive variety of mires and peatlands. Polygon, palsa, and aapa mires, concentric and eccentric bogs, spring and percolation fens, coastal marshes, blanket bogs, saline fens, acid, alkaline, nutrient poor, nutrient rich: the peatlands of Europe represent unique ecosystem biodiversity and harbour a large treasure of flora and fauna typical of peat forming environments. Europe is also the continent with the longest history, the highest intensity, and the largest variety of peatland use, and as a consequence it has the highest proportion of degraded peatlands worldwide. Peatland science and technology developed in parallel to exploitation and it is therefore not surprising that almost all modern peatland terms and concepts originated and matured in Europe. Their massive degradation also kindled the desire to protect these beautiful landscapes, full of peculiar wildlife. In recent decades attention has widened to include additional vital ecosystem services that natural and restored peatlands provide. Already the first scientific book on peatlands (Schoockius 1658) contained a chapter on restoration. Yet, only now there is a rising awareness of the necessity to conserve and restore mires and peatlands in order to avoid adverse environmental and economic effects. This book provides – for the first time in history – a comprehensive and up-to-date overview of mires and peatlands in biogeographic Europe. Written by 134 authors, the book describes mire and peatland types, terms, extent, distribution, use, conservation, and restoration individually for each country and integrated for the entire continent. Complemented by a multitude of maps and photographs, the book offers an impressive and colourful journey, full of surprising historical context and fascinating details, while appreciating the core principles and unifying concepts of mire science.
    Type of Medium: Monograph available for loan
    Pages: X, 780 Seiten , Illustrationen, Diagramme, Karten
    ISBN: 978-3-510-65383-6
    Language: English
    Location: Upper compact magazine
    Branch Library: GFZ Library
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  • 3
    Monograph available for loan
    Monograph available for loan
    Singapore : Palgrave Macmillan
    Call number: IASS 21.94810
    Description / Table of Contents: 1 Introduction -- 2 Re-Imagining human health in the Anthropocene -- 3 Connecting the dots..How the current planetary emergency affects our health and well-being- 4 Breaking out mental and institutional silos for positive transformation -- 5 The corridors of power as a stress test for planetary health -- 6 Tackling inequalities to unleash the full potential of planetary health.
    Description / Table of Contents: This book translates the latest theoretical perspectives on the emerging field of Planetary Health Studies into the practical reality of global political decision makers. It builds on the scientific data on the impacts of environmental change on human health to propose practical methods for operationalizing planetary health. The book maps opportunities for decision makers to break institutional silos and engage with bottom-up approaches that can transform planetary health from a global idea into a local reality. The analysis frames human health in the Anthropocene, an era in which humans have become the most powerful force affecting global ecosystems, and reveals new existential risks for humankind. Departing from ongoing multilateral efforts to promote sustainability, the author’s analysis places the agenda of planetary health on the desk of political decision makers, still underrepresented at planetary health gatherings. Given the pressing need to implement sustainable development policies, the book presents planetary health as an overarching framework for global policy targets, notably the UN Sustainable Development Goals, the Paris Agreement on Climate Change, and the post-2020 biodiversity framework under the UN Convention on Biological Diversity. The book is timely in offering a concrete road map for practitioners and researchers interested in transforming the concept of planetary health into reality. With a collection of success stories, the analysis dwells on tools for community engagement, opportunities for health professionals training, gender empowerment, digital health, and innovative ways to enhance human well-being on a changing planet. Dr. Nicole de Paula is the inaugural Klaus Töpfer Sustainability Fellow at the Institute for Advanced Sustainability Studies (IASS) in Germany and Founder of the Women Leaders for Planetary Health. Originally from Brazil, she holds a Ph.D. in International Relations from Sciences Po Paris. .
    Type of Medium: Monograph available for loan
    Pages: xv, 206 pages
    Edition: 1st ed. 2021.
    ISBN: 9789811637537 , 9789811637544
    Language: English
    Branch Library: IASS Library
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  • 4
    Monograph available for loan
    Monograph available for loan
    Viévy : Éditions de l'Escargot Savant
    Call number: AWI A4-22-94545
    Description / Table of Contents: Sea ice covers 20 million km² of our planet’s surface. It plays an important role in the Earth’s climate and is home to a variety of fascinating fauna, from the polar bear to the emperor penguin. Sailors and meteorologists use a wide range of terms such as frazil, pancake ice, floe or hummock to describe the different features of sea ice. This book includes an illustrated guide to sea ice so that polar travellers can discover this environment and understand ice charts. The story of sea ice is also a story of human endeavour. For the Inuit, fast ice is an ideal terrain for hunting, fishing and travelling. But for European explorers the drifting ice was an insurmountable barrier for centuries, crushing ships and forcing crews to spend long and difficult winters on the ice. It has also been the scene of incredible adventures involving planes, submarines, icebreakers and sometimes even rafts of drifting ice. But our planet is warming and the oldest polar sea ice is disappearing. The declining sea ice encourages the economic and industrial development of the Arctic, but also disrupts the climate, societies and fauna of the Far North. The author is a meteorologist who has wintered in Antarctica, lived in Greenland and guides several polar expedition cruises each year.
    Type of Medium: Monograph available for loan
    Pages: 112 Seiten , Illustrationen , 15 x 21 cm
    ISBN: 978-2-918299-26-4
    Series Statement: Maxi-Guides Collection : Polar Regions
    Language: English
    Note: Contents ILLUSTRATED GUIDE TO SEA ICE Presentation Ice development Fast ice Occurrence and concentration of floating ice Forms of floating ice Distribution of ice Openings in the ice Ice surface features Melt stages Break-up Charting sea ice Egg code SEA ICE Extent and area Thickness and salinity Currents Climatic role Life in the ice FAUNA The Arctic Antarctica MAN AND THE SEA ICE The Inuit Explorers from the 15th to the 19th century Shipwrecked on a raft of ice The Fram and the drifting ice stations Polar aircraft Polar submarines Icebreakers Tourism Sports , Übersetzung aus dem Französischen
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  • 5
    Call number: AWI G3-22-94801
    Type of Medium: Monograph available for loan
    Pages: 95 Seiten , Illustrationen
    ISBN: 978-5-89658-049-2
    Language: English
    Note: Contents INTRODUCTION / P.V.Krasilnikov PART I GENERAL CHARACTERIZATION OF ENVIRONMENTAL CONDITIONS Geological settings / D.E.Konyushkov, R.V.Desyatkin Climate and soil temperature dynamics / D.E.Konyushkov, R.V.Desyatkin, A.R.Desyatkin Geocryological conditions / D.E.Konyushkov, A.N.Fedorov Vegetation / D.E.Konyushkov, R.V.Desyatkin SOILS AND SOIL COVER PATTERNS – GENERAL SCOPE / D.E.Konyushkov, R.V.Desyatkin, S.F.Khokhlov ALAS PHENOMEN: SPECIFIC FEATURES, GENESIS AND DYNAMICS / R.V.Desyatkin, A.R.Desyatkin AGRICULTURE AND OTHER ANTHROPOGENIC ACTIVITY IN CENTRAL YAKUTIA / R.V.Desyatkin, M.V.Okoneshnikova PART II SOILS OF CENTRAL SAKHA (YAKUTIA) / S.V.Goryachkin, R.V.Desyatkin, E.M.Lapteva, M.N.Lebedeva, N.S.Mergelov, P.V.Krasilnikov, V.A.Shishkov, I.V.Turova E.P.Zazovskaya METHODS OF STUDY DAY 1 Vilyui road. Cambic Turbic Cryosol. Profile 11 Vilyui road. Turbic Cryosol Reductaquic. Profile 12 Sand hills near Tabaga. Haplic Stagnosol Arenic Turbic. Profile 15 DAY 2 Abalakh alas vicinities. Haplic Cryosol Albic Luvic Sodic. Profile 14 Abalakh alas. Salic Fluvisol. Profile 13-1 Abalakh alas. Stagnic Solonetz Turbic. Profile 13-2 DAY 3 Desyatkin Alas. Cryic Limnic Histosol. Profile 9-1 Desyatkin Alas. Thapto-Histic Limnic Fluvisol. Profile 9-2 Desyatkin Alas. Endogleyic Stagnosols Albic Arenic Turbic. Profile 9-3 Observation point. Khonorosh alas. Bulgunyakh (pingo) 4 DAY 4 Tabaga post-agrogenic soil. Stagnic Cambisol Calcaric. Profile 2-1 Tabaga post-agrogenic soil. Luvic Phaeozem Albic Turbic. Profile 2-2 Tabaga post-agrogenic soil. Calcic Mollic Solonetz Albic. Profile 2-3 Observation point. Badland on icy permafrost Lena terrace. Stagnic Chernozem Molliglossic Turbic. Profile 5 Lena terrace. Mollic Endogleyic Solonetz Turbic. Profile 6 Lena terrace. Hyposalic Solonetz. Profile 7 SOME GENERAL CHARACTERISTICS OF SOILS Cryogenic microfeatures Soluble salts in investigated soils DAY 5. Lena pillars CONCLUSION / (S.V.Goryachkin) ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS REFERENCES
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  • 6
    Monograph available for loan
    Monograph available for loan
    Chichester : Wiley
    Call number: AWI G3-08-0013 ; 13/M 13.0053 ; AWI G3-22-5374
    Description / Table of Contents: The periglacial environment, Third Edition, provides an authoritative overview of the world's cold, non-glacial environments. Emphasis is placed upon the North American and Eurasian polar lowlands. Examples are also drawn from Antarctica, the Qinghai-Xizang (Tibet) Plateau, and the northern mid-latitudes. [...] The Third Edition continues to be a personal interpretation of the frost-induced conditions, geomorphic processes, and landforms that typify periglacial environments. The text is divided into four parts. Part One discusses the periglacial concept and its interactions with geomorphology, geocryology and Quaternary science. It also outlines the range and variability of periglacial climates and the degree to which landscapes are in geomorphic equilibrium with prevailing periglacial conditions. Part Two describes present-day terrain that is either underlain by permafrost or experiencing intense frost action. The roles played by cryogenic weathering, ground ice, mass wasting, running water, wind action, snow and ice, and coastal processes are systematically analysed. Part Three summarizes evidence for the existence of periglacial conditions during the cold periods of the Pleistocene. Special reference is made to the mid-latitudes of Europe and North America. Part Four illustrates the geotechnical problems associated with human activity and resource development in periglacial environments, and discusses the potential impact of global climate change in the northern high latitudes.
    Type of Medium: Monograph available for loan
    Pages: XVIII, 458 Seiten , Illustrationen
    Edition: Third edition
    ISBN: 9780470865897
    Classification:
    Geography and Geomorphology
    Language: English
    Note: Contents: Preface to First Edition. - Preface to Second Edition. - Preface to Third Edition. - Acknowledgments. - Part I The Periglacial Domain. - 1 Introduction. - 1.1 The Periglacial Concept. - 1.2 Disciplinary Considerations. - 1.2.1 The Growth of Geocryology. - 1.2.2 The Changing Nature of Quaternary Science. - 1.2.3 Modern Periglacial Geomorphology. - 1.3 The Growth of Periglacial Knowledge. - 1.4 The Periglacial Domain. - 1.5 The Scope of Periglacial Geomorphology. - 1.5.1 Permafrost-Related Processes and Landforms. - 1.5.2 Azonal Processes and Landforms. - 1.5.3 Paleo-Environmental Reconstruction. - 1.5.4 Applied Periglacial Geomorphology. - Advanced Reading. - Discussion Topics. - 2 Periglacial Landscapes?. - 2.1 Introduction. - 2.2 Proglacial, Paraglacial or Periglacial?. - 2.3 Unglaciated Periglacial Terrain. - 2.3.1 Beaufort Plain, Northwest Banks Island, Arctic Canada. - 2.3.2 Barn Mountains, Northern Interior Yukon Territory, Canada. - 2.4 Relict Periglacial Landscapes. - 2.4.1 Chalk Uplands, Southern England and Northern France. - 2.4.2 Pine Barrens, Southern New Jersey, Eastern USA. - 2.5 Conclusions. - Advanced Reading. - Discussion Topics. - 3 Periglacial Climates. - 3.1 Boundary Conditions. - 3.2 Periglacial Climates. - 3.2.1 High Arctic Climates. - 3.2.2 Continental Climates. - 3.2.3 Qinghai-Xizang (Tibet) Plateau. - 3.2.4 Alpine Climates. - 3.2.5 Climates of Low Annual Temperature Range. - 3.2.6 Antarctica: A Special Case. - 3.3 Ground Climates. - 3.3.1 The n-Factor. - 3.3.2 The Thermal Offset. - 3.4 Periglacial Climates and the Cryosphere. - Advanced Reading. - Discussion Topics. - Part II Present-Day Periglacial Environments. - 4 Cold-Climate Weathering. - 4.1 Introduction. - 4.2 Ground Freezing. - 4.2.1 The Freezing Process. - 4.2.2 Ice Segregation. - 4.2.3 The Frozen Fringe. - 4.2.4 Frost Heave. - 4.3 Freezing and Thawing. - 4.4 The Ground-Temperature Regime. - 4.4.1 The Seasonal Regime. - 4.4.2 Short-Term Fluctuations. - 4.5 Rock (Frost?) Shattering. - 4.5.1 Frost Action and Ice Segregation. - 4.5.2 Frost Weathering Models. - 4.5.3 Insolation Weathering and Thermal Shock. - 4.5.4 Discussion and Perspective. - 4.6 Chemical Weathering. - 4.6.1 General. - 4.6.2 Solution and Karstification. - 4.6.3 Salt Weathering. - 4.7 Cryogenic Weathering. - 4.8 Cryobiological Weathering. - 4.9 Cryopedology. - 4.9.1 Cryosols. - 4.9.2 Soil Micromorphology. - Advanced Reading. - Discussion Topics. - 5 Permafrost. - 5.1 Introduction. - 5.1.1 Definition. - 5.1.2 Moisture and Ice within Permafrost. - 5.2 Thermal and Physical Properties. - 5.2.1 The Geothermal Regime. - 5.2.2 Physical Properties. - 5.2.3 Thermal Properties. - 5.3 How Does Permafrost Aggrade?. - 5.3.1 General Principles. - 5.3.2 The Illisarvik Drained-Lake Experiment. - 5.4 Distribution of Permafrost. - 5.4.1 Latitudinal Permafrost. - 5.4.2 Alpine (Mountain) Permafrost. - 5.4.3 Montane Permafrost of Central Asia and China. - 5.5 Relict Permafrost. - 5.5.1 Sub-Sea Permafrost. - 5.5.2 Relict (Terrestrial) Permafrost. - 5.6 Permafrost Hydrology. - 5.6.1 Aquifers. - 5.6.2 Hydrochemistry. - 5.6.3 Groundwater Icings. - 5.7 Permafrost and Terrain Conditions. - 5.7.1 Relief and Aspect. - 5.7.2 Rock Type. - 5.7.3 Vegetation. - 5.7.4 Snow Cover. - 5.7.5 Fire. - 5.7.6 Lakes and Surface Water Bodies. - 5.8 The Active Layer. - 5.8.1 The Transient Layer. - 5.8.2 The Stefan Equation. - 5.8.3 Active-Layer Thermal Regime. - Advanced Reading. - Discussion Topics. - 6 Surface Features of Permafrost. - 6.1 Introduction. - 6.2 Thermal-Contraction-Crack Polygons. - 6.2.1 Coefficients of Thermal Expansion and Contraction. - 6.2.2 Ice, Sand, and Soil Wedges. - 6.2.3 Development of the Polygon Net. - 6.2.4 Polygon Morphology. - 6.2.5 Controls Over Cracking. - 6.2.6 Climatic Significance. - 6.3 Organic Terrain. - 6.3.1 Palsas. - 6.3.2 Peat Plateaus. - 6.4 Rock Glaciers. - 6.4.1 Creeping Permafrost. - 6.4.2 Types and Distribution. - 6.4.3 Origin. - 6.5 Frost Mounds. - 6.5.1 Perennial-Frost Mounds. - 6.5.2 Hydraulic (Open) System Pingos. - 6.5.3 Hydrostatic (Closed) System Pingos. - 6.5.4 Other Perennial-Frost Mounds. - 6.5.5 Seasonal-Frost Mounds. - 6.5.6 Hydrolaccoliths and Other Frost-Induced Mounds. - 6.6 Active-Layer Phenomena. - 6.6.1 Bedrock Heave. - 6.6.2 Needle Ice. - 6.6.3 Cryoturbation and Frost Heave. - 6.6.4 Frost Sorting. - 6.6.5 Patterned Ground. - Advanced Reading. - Discussion Topics. - 7 Ground lce. - 7.1 Introduction. - 7.2 Classification. - 7.2.1 Pore Ice. - 7.2.2 Segregated Ice. - 7.2.3 Intrusive Ice. - 7.2.4 Vein Ice. - 7.2.5 Other Types of Ice. - 7.3 Ice Distribution. - 7.3.1 Amounts. - 7.3.2 Distribution with Depth. - 7.3.3 Ice in Bedrock. - 7.3.4 Ice in Unconsolidated Sediments. - 7.4 Cryostratigraphy and Cryolithology. - 7.4.1 Cryostructures, Cryotextures, and Cryofacies. - 7.4.2 Epigenetic and Syngenetic Cryostructures. - 7.4.3 Thaw Unconformities. - 7.4.4 Ice Crystallography. - 7.4.5 Ice Geochemistry. - 7.4.6 Cryostratigraphy and Past Environments. - 7.5 Ice Wedges. - 7.5.1 Epigenetic Wedges. - 7.5.2 Syngenetic Wedges. - 7.5.3 Anti-Syngenetic Wedges. - 7.6 Massive Ice and Massive-Icy Bodies. - 7.6.1 Nature and Extent. - 7.6.2 Intra-Sedimental Ice. - 7.6.3 Buried Glacier Ice. - 7.6.4 Other Mechanisms. - Advanced Reading. - Discussion Topics. - 8 Thermokarst. - 8.1 Introduction. - 8.2 Causes of Thermokarst. - 8.2.1 General. - 8.2.2 Specific. - 8.3 Thaw-Related Processes. - 8.3.1 Thermokarst Subsidence. - 8.3.2 Thermal Erosion. - 8.3.3 Other Processes. - 8.4 Thermokarst Sediments and Structures. - 8.4.1 Involuted Sediments. - 8.4.2 Retrogressive-Thaw-Slumps and Debris-Flow Deposits. - 8.4.3 Ice-Wedge Pseudomorphs and Composite-Wedge Casts. - 8.4.4 Ice, Silt, Sand, and Gravel Pseudomorphs. - 8.5 Ice-Wedge Thermokarst Relief. - 8.5.1 Low-Centered Polygons. - 8.5.2 High-Centered Polygons. - 8.5.3 Badland Thermokarst Relief. - 8.6 Thaw Lakes and Depressions. - 8.6.1 Morphology. - 8.6.2 Growth and Drainage. - 8.6.3 Oriented Thaw Lakes. - 8.7 Thermokarst-Affected Terrain. - 8.7.1 The Lowlands of Central and Northern Siberia. - 8.7.2 The Western North American Arctic. - 8.8 Human-Induced Thermokarst. - 8.8.1 Causes. - 8.8.2 Case Studies. - Advanced Reading. - Discussion Topics. - 9 Hillslope Processes and Slope Evolution. - 9.1 Introduction. - 9.2 Slope Morphology. - 9.2.1 The Free-Face Model. - 9.2.2 Rectilinear Debris-Mantled Slopes. - 9.2.3 Convexo-Concavo Debris-Mantled Slopes. - 9.2.4 Pediment-Like Slopes. - 9.2.5 Stepped Profiles. - 9.3 Mass Wasting. - 9.4 Slow Mass-Wasting Processes. - 9.4.1 Solifluction. - 9.4.2 Frost Creep. - 9.4.3 Gelifluction. - 9.4.4 Solifluction Deposits and Phenomena. - 9.5 Rapid Mass Wasting. - 9.5.1 Active-Layer-Detachment Slides. - 9.5.2 Debris Flows, Slushflows, and Avalanches. - 9.5.3 Rockfall. - 9.6 Slopewash. - 9.6.1 Snow-Bank Hydrology. - 9.6.2 Surface and Subsurface Wash. - 9.7 Frozen and Thawing Slopes. - 9.7.1 Permafrost Creep. - 9.7.2 Thermokarst and Thaw Consolidation. - 9.7.3 Stability of Thawing Slopes. - 9.8 Cold-Climate Slope Evolution. - 9.8.1 Cryoplanation. - 9.8.2 Slope Replacement and Richter Denudation Slopes. - 9.8.3 Rapidity of Profile Change. - 9.8.4 Summary. - Advanced Reading. - Discussion Topics. - 10 Azonal Processes and Landforms. - 10.1 Introduction. - 10.2 Fluvial Processes and Landforms. - 10.2.1 Major Rivers. - 10.2.2 Freeze-Up and Break-Up. - 10.2.3 Basin Hydrology. - 10.2.4 Sediment Flow, Surface Transport, and Denudation. - 10.2.5 Fluvio-Thermal Erosion. - 10.2.6 Channel Morphology. - 10.2.7 Valley Asymmetry. - 10.3 Eolian Processes and Sediments. - 10.3.1 Wind Abrasion. - 10.3.2 Wind Deflation. - 10.3.3 Niveo-Eolian Sediments. - 10.3.4 Loess-Like Silt. - 10.3.5 Sand Dunes and San
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    Location: Reading room
    Location: AWI Reading room
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  • 7
    Call number: AWI G3-22-94800
    Type of Medium: Dissertations
    Pages: ix, 85 Seiten , Illustrationen
    Language: English
    Note: Dissertation, Universität Potsdam, 2006
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