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  • 1
    ISSN: 1432-2242
    Keywords: Stable resistance ; Doubled haploids ; Pyricularia grisea ; Breeding ; Categorical data analysis
    Source: Springer Online Journal Archives 1860-2000
    Topics: Biology
    Notes: Abstract Crosses were made between Fanny (highly susceptible to blast) and 11 cultivars differing in blast resistance. Using the pedigree method (PM) segregating generations were evaluated and selected for blast resistance. Via anther culture (AC), doubled-haploids were obtained from F1 plants and from F2 blast-susceptible plants. Pedigree and anther culture-derived lines were planted together and evaluated for blast resistance under rainfed conditions at the Santa Rosa Experiment Station, Villavicencio, Colombia. The principal objective was to compare PM and AC in terms of their efficiency in producing rice lines resistant to blast. Results of a stratified analysis showed an association between method and blast resistance. Results of the logit-model analysis showed that AC produced a significantly (P=0.0001) higher proportion of lines with initial blast resistance (leaf- and neck-blast reaction ≤4) than did PM across all cross types. Stable blast resistance was assessed based on field performance over 3 years. AC was superior to PM in generating stable resistance for only some cross types. Consequently, with a few exceptions, AC can be used as effectively as PM to develop rice cultivars resistant to blast, with savings in time and labor. Additionally, blast-resistant lines were obtained either by the pedigree method or by anther culture from crosses between blast-susceptible cultivars (Fanny/CICA4 and Fanny/Colombial). This excludes somaclonal variation as a possible mechanism responsible for this resistance and suggests that a recombination of minor genes could have occurred and was fixed through either method. However, the stability of the resistance was greater in pedigree-derived lines. The implications of these findings for rice blast-resistance breeding are discussed.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 2
    ISSN: 1432-2242
    Keywords: Key words  Stable resistance  ;  Doubled haploids  ; Pyricularia grisea  ;  Breeding  ;  Categorical data analysis
    Source: Springer Online Journal Archives 1860-2000
    Topics: Biology
    Notes: Abstract   Crosses were made between Fanny (highly susceptible to blast) and 11 cultivars differing in blast resistance. Using the pedigree method (PM) segregating generations were evaluated and selected for blast resistance. Via anther culture (AC), doubled-haploids were obtained from F1 plants and from F2 blast-susceptible plants. Pedigree and anther culture-derived lines were planted together and evaluated for blast resistance under rainfed conditions at the Santa Rosa Experiment Station, Villavicencio, Colombia. The principal objective was to compare PM and AC in terms of their efficiency in producing rice lines resistant to blast. Results of a stratified analysis showed an association between method and blast resistance. Results of the logit-model analysis showed that AC produced a significantly (P=0.0001) higher proportion of lines with initial blast resistance (leaf- and neck-blast reaction ≤4) than did PM across all cross types. Stable blast resistance was assessed based on field performance over 3 years. AC was superior to PM in generating stable resistance for only some cross types. Consequently, with a few exceptions, AC can be used as effectively as PM to develop rice cultivars resistant to blast, with savings in time and labor. Additionally, blast-resistant lines were obtained either by the pedigree method or by anther culture from crosses between blast-susceptible cultivars (Fanny/CICA4 and Fanny/Colombia1). This excludes somaclonal variation as a possible mechanism responsible for this resistance and suggests that a recombination of minor genes could have occurred and was fixed through either method. However, the stability of the resistance was greater in pedigree-derived lines. The implications of these findings for rice blast-resistance breeding are discussed.
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  • 3
    ISSN: 0935-6304
    Keywords: High resolution GC-MS ; Mass spectrometry ; Anise oil ; Catalytic transformation ; Zeolite Y ; Chemistry ; Analytical Chemistry and Spectroscopy
    Source: Wiley InterScience Backfile Collection 1832-2000
    Topics: Chemistry and Pharmacology
    Additional Material: 2 Ill.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 4
    Publication Date: 2019
    Description: The self-learning methodology in simulated environments (MAES©) is an active method of education. The aim of this study was to analyze the perceptions and opinions of undergraduate and graduate nursing students about the self-learning methodology in simulated environments. A mixed, cross-sectional, descriptive study based on a survey tool made ad hoc (quantitative approach) and an open questionnaire (qualitative approach) was carried out. A sample of 149 undergraduate and 25 postgraduate nursing students were tested. The score was high for all the variables of the questionnaire analyzed: for perception of simulation performance, M = 73.5 (SD = 14.5), for motivation, M = 23.9 (SD = 5.9), for the opinion about facilitators, M = 25.9 (SD = 4.5), and for the promotion of team work, M = 16.9 (SD = 3.4). Five dimensions were identified and evaluated in the qualitative research. The students were pleased with MAES© and had a positive perception, since they considered that MAES© increased their learning.
    Print ISSN: 1661-7827
    Electronic ISSN: 1660-4601
    Topics: Energy, Environment Protection, Nuclear Power Engineering , Medicine
    Published by MDPI
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  • 5
    Publication Date: 2019
    Description: The aim of this study was to provide percentile values for a cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF) field test for Latin-American adolescents (34,461 girls and 38,044 boys) aged 13 to 15 years. The role of fatness parameters on the CRF level across age groups was also examined, with a focus on non-obese (healthy) and obese groups. CRF was assessed using the 20-meter shuttle run test protocol. Anthropometric parameters were measured using body mass index z-score (body mass index (BMI) z-score), BMI, waist circumference (WC), and waist-to-height ratio (WHtR). Participants were categorized according to the BMI z-score, WC, and WHtR international cut-off points as healthy and obese. Age- and sex-specific reference tables for the 3rd, 10th, 25th, 50th, 75th, 90th, and 97th centile scores were calculated using Cole’s lambda, mu, and sigma method. The prevalence of obesity according to the BMI z-score, WC, and WHtR was 9.6%, 11.2%, and 15.0%, respectively. Across all age and sex groups, a negative association was found between relative peak oxygen uptake ( V ˙ O2peak) and BMI, WC, and WHtR. In boys and girls there were higher levels of performance across all age groups, with most apparent gains between the ages of 13 and 14 years old. Overall, participants categorized in the healthy group had shown to have significantly higher V ˙ O2peak than their obese counterparts (p 〈 0.001; Cohen’s d 〉 1.0). In conclusion, our study provides age- and sex-specific reference values for CRF ( V ˙ O2peak, mL·kg−1·min−1). The anthropometric parameters were inversely associated with CRF in all ages in both sexes. The obese group had worse CRF than their healthy counterparts independent of anthropometric parameters used to determine obesity.
    Print ISSN: 1661-7827
    Electronic ISSN: 1660-4601
    Topics: Energy, Environment Protection, Nuclear Power Engineering , Medicine
    Published by MDPI
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  • 6
    Publication Date: 2013-06-13
    Description: The Journal of Organic Chemistry DOI: 10.1021/jo400417h
    Print ISSN: 0022-3263
    Electronic ISSN: 1520-6904
    Topics: Chemistry and Pharmacology
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  • 7
    Publication Date: 2015-04-01
    Description: This paper proposes a time series segmentation algorithm combining a clustering technique and a genetic algorithm to automatically find segments sharing common statistical characteristics in paleoclimate time series. The segments are transformed into a six-dimensional space composed of six statistical measures, most of which have been previously considered in the detection of warning signals of critical transitions. Experimental results show that the proposed approach applied to paleoclimate data could effectively analyse Dansgaard–Oeschger (DO) events and uncover commonalities and differences in their statistical and possibly their dynamical characterisation. In particular, warning signals were robustly detected in the GISP2 and NGRIP $$delta {18}hbox {O}$$ δ 18 O ice core data for several DO events (e.g. DO 1, 4, 8 and 12) in the form of an order of magnitude increase in variance, autocorrelation and mean square distance from a linear approximation (i.e. the mean square error). The increase in mean square error, suggesting nonlinear behaviour, has been found to correspond with an increase in variance prior to several DO events for $$sim $$ ∼ 90 % of the algorithm runs for the GISP2 $$delta {18}hbox {O}$$ δ 18 O dataset and for $$sim $$ ∼ 100 % of the algorithm runs for the NGRIP $$delta {18}hbox {O}$$ δ 18 O dataset. The proposed approach applied to well-known dynamical systems and paleoclimate datasets provides a novel visualisation tool in the field of climate time series analysis. ©2014 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg
    Print ISSN: 0930-7575
    Electronic ISSN: 1432-0894
    Topics: Geosciences , Physics
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  • 8
    Publication Date: 2018-04-03
    Description: IJERPH, Vol. 15, Pages 657: Full Atrioventricular Block Secondary to Acute Poisoning Mercury: A Case Report International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health doi: 10.3390/ijerph15040657 Authors: Amelia Peregrina-Chávez María Ramírez-Galindo Rolando Chávez-Martínez Cesar Delahanty-Delgado Fernando Vazquez-Alaniz Background: The biological behaviour and clinical significance of mercury toxicity vary according to its chemical structure. Mercury differs in its degree of toxicity and in its effects on the nervous, digestive and immune systems as well as on organs such as the lungs, kidneys, skin, eyes and heart. Human exposure occurs mainly through inhalation of elemental mercury vapours during industrial and artisanal processes such as artisanal and small-scale gold mining. Case presentation: A 52-years-old female, housewife, with a body mass index of 25.3 kg/cm2, without smoking or alcohol habits or any important clinical or chronic cardiovascular history, was admitted to the emergency room due to probable accidental poisoning by butane gas. Clinical manifestations with a headache, dizziness, cough, and dyspnoea of medium to small efforts. An initial physical exploration with Glasgow scored at 15, with arrhythmic heart sounds, pulmonary fields with bilateral subcrepitant rales and right basal predominance. Electrocardiographic findings were as follows: a cardiac frequency of 50 beats per minute and atrioventricular dissociation. Laboratory parameters were: white blood cells at 15.8 × 109/L; aspartate aminotransferase at 38 U/L; lactate dehydrogenase at 1288 U/L; creatine-kinase at 115 U/L; CK-MB fraction at 28 U/L; and other biochemical parameters were within the reference values. A radiographic evaluation showed flow cephalization, diffuse bilateral infiltrates with right basal predominance. In addition, the patient presented data of low secondary expenditure to third-degree atrioventricular (AV) block for which the placement of a transvenous pacemaker was decided, substantially improving the haemodynamic parameters. Subsequently, after a family interrogation, the diagnosis of mercury inhalation poisoning was established. An initial detection of mercury concentration (Hg(0)) was carried out, reporting 243.5 µg/L. In view of this new evidence, mercury chelation therapy with intravenous calcium disodium ethylenediamine tetraacetic acid (CaNa2·EDTA) was initiated. After 8-days of hospital stay, she presented a favourable evolution with both clinical and radiological improvements, so that the mechanical ventilation progressed to extubating. Subsequently, she was referred for cardiology because of her persistent 3rd-degree atrioventricular block, deciding to place a definitive bicameral pacemaker. The patient was discharged from the hospital 14 days after admission due to clinical improvements with mercury plasma levels at 5 µmol/L and a heart rhythm from the pacemaker. Conclusions: We show evidence that acute exposure to elemental mercury can affect the heart rhythm, including a complete atrioventricular blockage.
    Print ISSN: 1661-7827
    Electronic ISSN: 1660-4601
    Topics: Energy, Environment Protection, Nuclear Power Engineering , Medicine
    Published by MDPI Publishing
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  • 9
    Publication Date: 2006-12-01
    Description: The Aguablanca Ni–(Cu) sulfide deposit is hosted by a breccia pipe within a gabbro–diorite pluton. The deposit probably formed due to the disruption of a partially crystallized layered mafic complex at about 12–19 km depth and the subsequent emplacement of melts and breccias at shallow levels (〈2 km). The ore-hosting breccias are interpreted as fragments of an ultramafic cumulate, which were transported to the near surface along with a molten sulfide melt. Phlogopite Ar–Ar ages are 341–332 Ma in the breccia pipe, and 338–334 Ma in the layered mafic complex, and are similar to recently reported U–Pb ages of the host Aguablanca Stock and other nearby calc-alkaline metaluminous intrusions (ca. 350–330 Ma). Ore deposition resulted from the combination of two critical factors, the emplacement of a layered mafic complex deep in the continental crust and the development of small dilational structures along transcrustal strike-slip faults that triggered the forceful intrusion of magmas to shallow levels. The emplacement of basaltic magmas in the lower middle crust was accompanied by major interaction with the host rocks, immiscibility of a sulfide melt, and the formation of a magma chamber with ultramafic cumulates and sulfide melt at the bottom and a vertically zoned mafic to intermediate magmas above. Dismembered bodies of mafic/ultramafic rocks thought to be parts of the complex crop out about 50 km southwest of the deposit in a tectonically uplifted block (Cortegana Igneous Complex, Aracena Massif). Reactivation of Variscan structures that merged at the depth of the mafic complex led to sequential extraction of melts, cumulates, and sulfide magma. Lithogeochemistry and Sr and Nd isotope data of the Aguablanca Stock reflect the mixing from two distinct reservoirs, i.e., an evolved siliciclastic middle-upper continental crust and a primitive tholeiitic melt. Crustal contamination in the deep magma chamber was so intense that orthopyroxene replaced olivine as the main mineral phase controlling the early fractional crystallization of the melt. Geochemical evidence includes enrichment in SiO2 and incompatible elements, and Sr and Nd isotope compositions (87Sr/86Sri 0.708–0.710; 143Nd/144Ndi 0.512–0.513). However, rocks of the Cortegana Igneous Complex have low initial 87Sr/86Sr and high initial 143Nd/144Nd values suggesting contamination by lower crustal rocks. Comparison of the geochemical and geological features of igneous rocks in the Aguablanca deposit and the Cortegana Igneous Complex indicates that, although probably part of the same magmatic system, they are rather different and the rocks of the Cortegana Igneous Complex were not the direct source of the Aguablanca deposit. Crust–magma interaction was a complex process, and the generation of orebodies was controlled by local but highly variable factors. The model for the formation of the Aguablanca deposit presented in this study implies that dense sulfide melts can effectively travel long distances through the continental crust and that dilational zones within compressional belts can effectively focus such melt transport into shallow environments. ©2006 Springer-Verlag
    Print ISSN: 0026-4598
    Electronic ISSN: 1432-1866
    Topics: Geosciences
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  • 10
    Publication Date: 2016-08-02
    Electronic ISSN: 1996-1073
    Topics: Energy, Environment Protection, Nuclear Power Engineering
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