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  • 1
    ISSN: 0032-3888
    Keywords: Chemistry ; Chemical Engineering
    Source: Wiley InterScience Backfile Collection 1832-2000
    Topics: Chemistry and Pharmacology , Mechanical Engineering, Materials Science, Production Engineering, Mining and Metallurgy, Traffic Engineering, Precision Mechanics , Physics
    Additional Material: 1 Ill.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 2
    Publication Date: 2015-10-14
    Description: In human adults, learning and memory under acute stress are characterized by an increased use of rigid habitual response strategies at the cost of flexible cognitive strategies. The immediate effects of stress on cognitive functioning early in life are not well understood. Here we show experimentally that acute stress leads...
    Print ISSN: 0027-8424
    Electronic ISSN: 1091-6490
    Topics: Biology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General
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  • 3
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    Kaiser, F. J., Ansari, M., Braunholz, D., Concepcion Gil-Rodriguez, M., Decroos, C., Wilde, J. J., Fincher, C. T., Kaur, M., Bando, M., Amor, D. J., Atwal, P. S., Bahlo, M., Bowman, C. M., Bradley, J. J., Brunner, H. G., Clark, D., Del Campo, M., Di Donato, N., Diakumis, P., Dubbs, H., Dyment, D. A., Eckhold, J., Ernst, S., Ferreira, J. C., Francey, L. J., Gehlken, U., Guillen-Navarro, E., Gyftodimou, Y., Hall, B. D., Hennekam, R., Hudgins, L., Hullings, M., Hunter, J. M., Yntema, H., Innes, A. M., Kline, A. D., Krumina, Z., Lee, H., Leppig, K., Lynch, S. A., Mallozzi, M. B., Mannini, L., Mckee, S., Mehta, S. G., Micule, I., Care4; Rare Canada Consortium, Mohammed, S., Moran, E., Mortier, G. R., Moser, J.-A. S., Noon, S. E., Nozaki, N., Nunes, L., Pappas, J. G., Penney, L. S., Perez-Aytes, A., Petersen, M. B., Puisac, B., Revencu, N., Roeder, E., Saitta, S., Scheuerle, A. E., Schindeler, K. L., Siu, V. M., Stark, Z., Strom, S. P., Thiese, H., Vater, I., Willems, P., Williamson, K., Wilson, L. C., University of Washington Center for Mendelian Genomics, Hakonarson, H., Quintero-Rivera, F., Wierzba, J., Musio, A., Gillessen-Kaesbach, G., Ramos, F. J., Jackson, L. G., Shirahige, K., Pie, J., Christianson, D. W., Krantz, I. D., Fitzpatrick, D. R., Deardorff, M. A.
    Oxford University Press
    Publication Date: 2014-05-09
    Description: Cornelia de Lange syndrome (CdLS) is a multisystem genetic disorder with distinct facies, growth failure, intellectual disability, distal limb anomalies, gastrointestinal and neurological disease. Mutations in NIPBL , encoding a cohesin regulatory protein, account for 〉80% of cases with typical facies. Mutations in the core cohesin complex proteins, encoded by the SMC1A , SMC3 and RAD21 genes, together account for ~5% of subjects, often with atypical CdLS features. Recently, we identified mutations in the X-linked gene HDAC8 as the cause of a small number of CdLS cases. Here, we report a cohort of 38 individuals with an emerging spectrum of features caused by HDAC8 mutations. For several individuals, the diagnosis of CdLS was not considered prior to genomic testing . Most mutations identified are missense and de novo . Many cases are heterozygous females, each with marked skewing of X-inactivation in peripheral blood DNA. We also identified eight hemizygous males who are more severely affected. The craniofacial appearance caused by HDAC8 mutations overlaps that of typical CdLS but often displays delayed anterior fontanelle closure, ocular hypertelorism, hooding of the eyelids, a broader nose and dental anomalies, which may be useful discriminating features. HDAC8 encodes the lysine deacetylase for the cohesin subunit SMC3 and analysis of the functional consequences of the missense mutations indicates that all cause a loss of enzymatic function. These data demonstrate that loss-of-function mutations in HDAC8 cause a range of overlapping human developmental phenotypes, including a phenotypically distinct subgroup of CdLS.
    Print ISSN: 0964-6906
    Electronic ISSN: 1460-2083
    Topics: Biology , Medicine
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  • 4
    Publication Date: 2019
    Description: 〈p〉Chromosome errors, or aneuploidy, affect an exceptionally high number of human conceptions, causing pregnancy loss and congenital disorders. Here, we have followed chromosome segregation in human oocytes from females aged 9 to 43 years and report that aneuploidy follows a U-curve. Specific segregation error types show different age dependencies, providing a quantitative explanation for the U-curve. Whole-chromosome nondisjunction events are preferentially associated with increased aneuploidy in young girls, whereas centromeric and more extensive cohesion loss limit fertility as women age. Our findings suggest that chromosomal errors originating in oocytes determine the curve of natural fertility in humans.〈/p〉
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 5
    Publication Date: 2011-10-14
    Description: The comparison of related genomes has emerged as a powerful lens for genome interpretation. Here we report the sequencing and comparative analysis of 29 eutherian genomes. We confirm that at least 5.5% of the human genome has undergone purifying selection, and locate constrained elements covering approximately 4.2% of the genome. We use evolutionary signatures and comparisons with experimental data sets to suggest candidate functions for approximately 60% of constrained bases. These elements reveal a small number of new coding exons, candidate stop codon readthrough events and over 10,000 regions of overlapping synonymous constraint within protein-coding exons. We find 220 candidate RNA structural families, and nearly a million elements overlapping potential promoter, enhancer and insulator regions. We report specific amino acid residues that have undergone positive selection, 280,000 non-coding elements exapted from mobile elements and more than 1,000 primate- and human-accelerated elements. Overlap with disease-associated variants indicates that our findings will be relevant for studies of human biology, health and disease.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3207357/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3207357/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Lindblad-Toh, Kerstin -- Garber, Manuel -- Zuk, Or -- Lin, Michael F -- Parker, Brian J -- Washietl, Stefan -- Kheradpour, Pouya -- Ernst, Jason -- Jordan, Gregory -- Mauceli, Evan -- Ward, Lucas D -- Lowe, Craig B -- Holloway, Alisha K -- Clamp, Michele -- Gnerre, Sante -- Alfoldi, Jessica -- Beal, Kathryn -- Chang, Jean -- Clawson, Hiram -- Cuff, James -- Di Palma, Federica -- Fitzgerald, Stephen -- Flicek, Paul -- Guttman, Mitchell -- Hubisz, Melissa J -- Jaffe, David B -- Jungreis, Irwin -- Kent, W James -- Kostka, Dennis -- Lara, Marcia -- Martins, Andre L -- Massingham, Tim -- Moltke, Ida -- Raney, Brian J -- Rasmussen, Matthew D -- Robinson, Jim -- Stark, Alexander -- Vilella, Albert J -- Wen, Jiayu -- Xie, Xiaohui -- Zody, Michael C -- Broad Institute Sequencing Platform and Whole Genome Assembly Team -- Baldwin, Jen -- Bloom, Toby -- Chin, Chee Whye -- Heiman, Dave -- Nicol, Robert -- Nusbaum, Chad -- Young, Sarah -- Wilkinson, Jane -- Worley, Kim C -- Kovar, Christie L -- Muzny, Donna M -- Gibbs, Richard A -- Baylor College of Medicine Human Genome Sequencing Center Sequencing Team -- Cree, Andrew -- Dihn, Huyen H -- Fowler, Gerald -- Jhangiani, Shalili -- Joshi, Vandita -- Lee, Sandra -- Lewis, Lora R -- Nazareth, Lynne V -- Okwuonu, Geoffrey -- Santibanez, Jireh -- Warren, Wesley C -- Mardis, Elaine R -- Weinstock, George M -- Wilson, Richard K -- Genome Institute at Washington University -- Delehaunty, Kim -- Dooling, David -- Fronik, Catrina -- Fulton, Lucinda -- Fulton, Bob -- Graves, Tina -- Minx, Patrick -- Sodergren, Erica -- Birney, Ewan -- Margulies, Elliott H -- Herrero, Javier -- Green, Eric D -- Haussler, David -- Siepel, Adam -- Goldman, Nick -- Pollard, Katherine S -- Pedersen, Jakob S -- Lander, Eric S -- Kellis, Manolis -- 095908/Wellcome Trust/United Kingdom -- GM82901/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- R01 HG003474/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- R01 HG004037/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- U54 HG003067/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- U54 HG003067-09/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- U54 HG003273/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- Howard Hughes Medical Institute/ -- England -- Nature. 2011 Oct 12;478(7370):476-82. doi: 10.1038/nature10530.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Broad Institute of Harvard and Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 7 Cambridge Center, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02142, USA. kersli@broadinstitute.org〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21993624" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Disease ; *Evolution, Molecular ; Exons/genetics ; Genome/*genetics ; Genome, Human/*genetics ; Genomics ; Health ; Humans ; Mammals/*genetics ; Molecular Sequence Annotation ; Phylogeny ; RNA/classification/genetics ; Selection, Genetic/genetics ; Sequence Alignment ; Sequence Analysis, DNA
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 6
    Publication Date: 2015-02-20
    Description: The reference human genome sequence set the stage for studies of genetic variation and its association with human disease, but epigenomic studies lack a similar reference. To address this need, the NIH Roadmap Epigenomics Consortium generated the largest collection so far of human epigenomes for primary cells and tissues. Here we describe the integrative analysis of 111 reference human epigenomes generated as part of the programme, profiled for histone modification patterns, DNA accessibility, DNA methylation and RNA expression. We establish global maps of regulatory elements, define regulatory modules of coordinated activity, and their likely activators and repressors. We show that disease- and trait-associated genetic variants are enriched in tissue-specific epigenomic marks, revealing biologically relevant cell types for diverse human traits, and providing a resource for interpreting the molecular basis of human disease. Our results demonstrate the central role of epigenomic information for understanding gene regulation, cellular differentiation and human disease.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4530010/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4530010/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Roadmap Epigenomics Consortium -- Kundaje, Anshul -- Meuleman, Wouter -- Ernst, Jason -- Bilenky, Misha -- Yen, Angela -- Heravi-Moussavi, Alireza -- Kheradpour, Pouya -- Zhang, Zhizhuo -- Wang, Jianrong -- Ziller, Michael J -- Amin, Viren -- Whitaker, John W -- Schultz, Matthew D -- Ward, Lucas D -- Sarkar, Abhishek -- Quon, Gerald -- Sandstrom, Richard S -- Eaton, Matthew L -- Wu, Yi-Chieh -- Pfenning, Andreas R -- Wang, Xinchen -- Claussnitzer, Melina -- Liu, Yaping -- Coarfa, Cristian -- Harris, R Alan -- Shoresh, Noam -- Epstein, Charles B -- Gjoneska, Elizabeta -- Leung, Danny -- Xie, Wei -- Hawkins, R David -- Lister, Ryan -- Hong, Chibo -- Gascard, Philippe -- Mungall, Andrew J -- Moore, Richard -- Chuah, Eric -- Tam, Angela -- Canfield, Theresa K -- Hansen, R Scott -- Kaul, Rajinder -- Sabo, Peter J -- Bansal, Mukul S -- Carles, Annaick -- Dixon, Jesse R -- Farh, Kai-How -- Feizi, Soheil -- Karlic, Rosa -- Kim, Ah-Ram -- Kulkarni, Ashwinikumar -- Li, Daofeng -- Lowdon, Rebecca -- Elliott, GiNell -- Mercer, Tim R -- Neph, Shane J -- Onuchic, Vitor -- Polak, Paz -- Rajagopal, Nisha -- Ray, Pradipta -- Sallari, Richard C -- Siebenthall, Kyle T -- Sinnott-Armstrong, Nicholas A -- Stevens, Michael -- Thurman, Robert E -- Wu, Jie -- Zhang, Bo -- Zhou, Xin -- Beaudet, Arthur E -- Boyer, Laurie A -- De Jager, Philip L -- Farnham, Peggy J -- Fisher, Susan J -- Haussler, David -- Jones, Steven J M -- Li, Wei -- Marra, Marco A -- McManus, Michael T -- Sunyaev, Shamil -- Thomson, James A -- Tlsty, Thea D -- Tsai, Li-Huei -- Wang, Wei -- Waterland, Robert A -- Zhang, Michael Q -- Chadwick, Lisa H -- Bernstein, Bradley E -- Costello, Joseph F -- Ecker, Joseph R -- Hirst, Martin -- Meissner, Alexander -- Milosavljevic, Aleksandar -- Ren, Bing -- Stamatoyannopoulos, John A -- Wang, Ting -- Kellis, Manolis -- 5R24HD000836/HD/NICHD NIH HHS/ -- ES017166/ES/NIEHS NIH HHS/ -- F32 HL110473/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS/ -- F32HL110473/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS/ -- K99 HL119617/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS/ -- K99HL119617/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS/ -- P01 DA008227/DA/NIDA NIH HHS/ -- P30AG10161/AG/NIA NIH HHS/ -- P50 MH096890/MH/NIMH NIH HHS/ -- R01 AG015819/AG/NIA NIH HHS/ -- R01 AG017917/AG/NIA NIH HHS/ -- R01 ES024984/ES/NIEHS NIH HHS/ -- R01 ES024992/ES/NIEHS NIH HHS/ -- R01 HG004037/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- R01 HG007175/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- R01 HG007354/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- R01AG15819/AG/NIA NIH HHS/ -- R01AG17917/AG/NIA NIH HHS/ -- R01HG004037/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- R01HG004037-S1/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- R01NS078839/NS/NINDS NIH HHS/ -- RC1HG005334/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- RF1 AG015819/AG/NIA NIH HHS/ -- T32 ES007032/ES/NIEHS NIH HHS/ -- T32 GM007198/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- T32 GM007266/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- T32 GM081739/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- U01 ES017154/ES/NIEHS NIH HHS/ -- U01AG46152/AG/NIA NIH HHS/ -- U01DA025956/DA/NIDA NIH HHS/ -- U01ES017154/ES/NIEHS NIH HHS/ -- U01ES017155/ES/NIEHS NIH HHS/ -- U01ES017156/ES/NIEHS NIH HHS/ -- U01ES017166/ES/NIEHS NIH HHS/ -- Howard Hughes Medical Institute/ -- England -- Nature. 2015 Feb 19;518(7539):317-30. doi: 10.1038/nature14248.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉1] Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Lab, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 32 Vassar St, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139, USA. [2] The Broad Institute of Harvard and MIT, 415 Main Street, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02142, USA. [3] Department of Genetics, Department of Computer Science, 300 Pasteur Dr., Lane Building, L301, Stanford, California 94305-5120, USA. ; 1] Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Lab, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 32 Vassar St, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139, USA. [2] The Broad Institute of Harvard and MIT, 415 Main Street, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02142, USA. ; 1] Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Lab, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 32 Vassar St, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139, USA. [2] The Broad Institute of Harvard and MIT, 415 Main Street, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02142, USA. [3] Department of Biological Chemistry, University of California, Los Angeles, 615 Charles E Young Dr South, Los Angeles, California 90095, USA. ; Canada's Michael Smith Genome Sciences Centre, BC Cancer Agency, 675 West 10th Avenue, Vancouver, British Columbia V5Z 1L3, Canada. ; 1] The Broad Institute of Harvard and MIT, 415 Main Street, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02142, USA. [2] Department of Stem Cell and Regenerative Biology, 7 Divinity Ave, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138, USA. ; Epigenome Center, Baylor College of Medicine, One Baylor Plaza, Houston, Texas 77030, USA. ; Department of Cellular and Molecular Medicine, Institute of Genomic Medicine, Moores Cancer Center, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of California San Diego, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, California 92093, USA. ; Genomic Analysis Laboratory, Howard Hughes Medical Institute &The Salk Institute for Biological Studies, 10010 N. Torrey Pines Road, La Jolla, California 92037, USA. ; Department of Genome Sciences, University of Washington, 3720 15th Ave. NE, Seattle, Washington 98195, USA. ; 1] Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Lab, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 32 Vassar St, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139, USA. [2] The Broad Institute of Harvard and MIT, 415 Main Street, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02142, USA. [3] Biology Department, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 31 Ames St, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02142, USA. ; The Broad Institute of Harvard and MIT, 415 Main Street, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02142, USA. ; 1] The Broad Institute of Harvard and MIT, 415 Main Street, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02142, USA. [2] The Picower Institute for Learning and Memory, Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 43 Vassar St, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139, USA. ; 1] Department of Cellular and Molecular Medicine, Institute of Genomic Medicine, Moores Cancer Center, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of California San Diego, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, California 92093, USA. [2] Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, California 92093, USA. ; Department of Neurosurgery, Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California San Francisco, 1450 3rd Street, San Francisco, California 94158, USA. ; Department of Pathology, University of California San Francisco, 513 Parnassus Avenue, San Francisco, California 94143-0511, USA. ; Department of Medicine, Division of Medical Genetics, University of Washington, 2211 Elliot Avenue, Seattle, Washington 98121, USA. ; 1] Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Lab, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 32 Vassar St, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139, USA. [2] The Broad Institute of Harvard and MIT, 415 Main Street, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02142, USA. [3] Department of Computer Science &Engineering, University of Connecticut, 371 Fairfield Way, Storrs, Connecticut 06269, USA. ; Department of Microbiology and Immunology and Centre for High-Throughput Biology, University of British Columbia, 2125 East Mall, Vancouver, British Columbia V6T 1Z4, Canada. ; Bioinformatics Group, Department of Molecular Biology, Division of Biology, Faculty of Science, University of Zagreb, Horvatovac 102a, 10000 Zagreb, Croatia. ; Department of Molecular and Cell Biology, Center for Systems Biology, The University of Texas, Dallas, NSERL, RL10, 800 W Campbell Road, Richardson, Texas 75080, USA. ; Department of Genetics, Center for Genome Sciences and Systems Biology, Washington University in St Louis, 4444 Forest Park Ave, St Louis, Missouri 63108, USA. ; Institute for Molecular Bioscience, University of Queensland, St Lucia, Queensland 4072, Australia. ; 1] The Broad Institute of Harvard and MIT, 415 Main Street, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02142, USA. [2] Brigham &Women's Hospital, 75 Francis Street, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA. ; 1] Department of Genetics, Center for Genome Sciences and Systems Biology, Washington University in St Louis, 4444 Forest Park Ave, St Louis, Missouri 63108, USA. [2] Department of Computer Science and Engineeering, Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, Missouri 63130, USA. ; 1] Department of Applied Mathematics and Statistics, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, New York 11794-3600, USA. [2] Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, Cold Spring Harbor, New York 11724, USA. ; Molecular and Human Genetics Department, Baylor College of Medicine, One Baylor Plaza, Houston, Texas 77030, USA. ; Biology Department, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 31 Ames St, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02142, USA. ; 1] The Broad Institute of Harvard and MIT, 415 Main Street, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02142, USA. [2] Brigham &Women's Hospital, 75 Francis Street, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA. [3] Harvard Medical School, 25 Shattuck St, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA. ; Department of Biochemistry, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, 1450 Biggy Street, Los Angeles, California 90089-9601, USA. ; ObGyn, Reproductive Sciences, University of California San Francisco, 35 Medical Center Way, San Francisco, California 94143, USA. ; Center for Biomolecular Sciences and Engineering, University of Santa Cruz, 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, California 95064, USA. ; 1] Canada's Michael Smith Genome Sciences Centre, BC Cancer Agency, 675 West 10th Avenue, Vancouver, British Columbia V5Z 1L3, Canada. [2] Department of Molecular Biology and Biochemistry, Simon Fraser University, 8888 University Drive, Burnaby, British Columbia V5A 1S6, Canada. [3] Department of Medical Genetics, University of British Columbia, 2329 West Mall, Vancouver, BC, Canada, V6T 1Z4. ; Dan L. Duncan Cancer Center, Baylor College of Medicine, One Baylor Plaza, Houston, Texas 77030, USA. ; 1] Canada's Michael Smith Genome Sciences Centre, BC Cancer Agency, 675 West 10th Avenue, Vancouver, British Columbia V5Z 1L3, Canada. [2] Department of Medical Genetics, University of British Columbia, 2329 West Mall, Vancouver, BC, Canada, V6T 1Z4. ; Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Diabetes Center, University of California, San Francisco, 513 Parnassus Ave, San Francisco, California 94143-0534, USA. ; 1] University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53715, USA. [2] Morgridge Institute for Research, 330 N. Orchard Street, Madison, Wisconsin 53707, USA. ; USDA/ARS Children's Nutrition Research Center, Baylor College of Medicine, 1100 Bates Street, Houston, Texas 77030, USA. ; 1] Department of Molecular and Cell Biology, Center for Systems Biology, The University of Texas, Dallas, NSERL, RL10, 800 W Campbell Road, Richardson, Texas 75080, USA. [2] Bioinformatics Division, Center for Synthetic and Systems Biology, TNLIST, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084, China. ; National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, 111 T.W. Alexander Drive, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina 27709, USA. ; 1] The Broad Institute of Harvard and MIT, 415 Main Street, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02142, USA. [2] Massachusetts General Hospital, 55 Fruit St, Boston, Massachusetts 02114, USA. [3] Howard Hughes Medical Institute, 4000 Jones Bridge Road, Chevy Chase, Maryland 20815-6789, USA. ; 1] Canada's Michael Smith Genome Sciences Centre, BC Cancer Agency, 675 West 10th Avenue, Vancouver, British Columbia V5Z 1L3, Canada. [2] Department of Microbiology and Immunology and Centre for High-Throughput Biology, University of British Columbia, 2125 East Mall, Vancouver, British Columbia V6T 1Z4, Canada.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25693563" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Base Sequence ; Cell Lineage/genetics ; Cells, Cultured ; Chromatin/chemistry/genetics/metabolism ; Chromosomes, Human/chemistry/genetics/metabolism ; DNA/chemistry/genetics/metabolism ; DNA Methylation ; Datasets as Topic ; Enhancer Elements, Genetic/genetics ; Epigenesis, Genetic/*genetics ; *Epigenomics ; Genetic Variation/genetics ; Genome, Human/*genetics ; Genome-Wide Association Study ; Histones/metabolism ; Humans ; Organ Specificity/genetics ; RNA/genetics ; Reference Values
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 7
    Publication Date: 2010-12-24
    Description: Chromatin is composed of DNA and a variety of modified histones and non-histone proteins, which have an impact on cell differentiation, gene regulation and other key cellular processes. Here we present a genome-wide chromatin landscape for Drosophila melanogaster based on eighteen histone modifications, summarized by nine prevalent combinatorial patterns. Integrative analysis with other data (non-histone chromatin proteins, DNase I hypersensitivity, GRO-Seq reads produced by engaged polymerase, short/long RNA products) reveals discrete characteristics of chromosomes, genes, regulatory elements and other functional domains. We find that active genes display distinct chromatin signatures that are correlated with disparate gene lengths, exon patterns, regulatory functions and genomic contexts. We also demonstrate a diversity of signatures among Polycomb targets that include a subset with paused polymerase. This systematic profiling and integrative analysis of chromatin signatures provides insights into how genomic elements are regulated, and will serve as a resource for future experimental investigations of genome structure and function.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3109908/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3109908/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Kharchenko, Peter V -- Alekseyenko, Artyom A -- Schwartz, Yuri B -- Minoda, Aki -- Riddle, Nicole C -- Ernst, Jason -- Sabo, Peter J -- Larschan, Erica -- Gorchakov, Andrey A -- Gu, Tingting -- Linder-Basso, Daniela -- Plachetka, Annette -- Shanower, Gregory -- Tolstorukov, Michael Y -- Luquette, Lovelace J -- Xi, Ruibin -- Jung, Youngsook L -- Park, Richard W -- Bishop, Eric P -- Canfield, Theresa K -- Sandstrom, Richard -- Thurman, Robert E -- MacAlpine, David M -- Stamatoyannopoulos, John A -- Kellis, Manolis -- Elgin, Sarah C R -- Kuroda, Mitzi I -- Pirrotta, Vincenzo -- Karpen, Gary H -- Park, Peter J -- R01 GM071923/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- R01 GM082798/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- R01 HG004037/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- R37 GM45744/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- RC1 HG005334/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- RC2 HG005639/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- U01 HG004258/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- U01 HG004258-04/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- U01 HG004279/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- U01HG004258/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- U54 HG004592/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- England -- Nature. 2011 Mar 24;471(7339):480-5. doi: 10.1038/nature09725. Epub 2010 Dec 22.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Center for Biomedical Informatics, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21179089" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Cell Line ; Chromatin/*genetics/*metabolism ; Chromatin Immunoprecipitation ; Chromosomal Proteins, Non-Histone/analysis/metabolism ; Deoxyribonuclease I/metabolism ; Drosophila Proteins/genetics ; Drosophila melanogaster/embryology/*genetics/growth & development ; Exons/genetics ; Gene Expression Regulation/genetics ; Genes, Insect/genetics ; Genome, Insect/genetics ; Histones/chemistry/metabolism ; Male ; Molecular Sequence Annotation ; Oligonucleotide Array Sequence Analysis ; Polycomb Repressive Complex 1 ; RNA/analysis/genetics ; Sequence Analysis ; Transcription, Genetic/genetics
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 8
    Publication Date: 2016-09-30
    Description: Author(s): F. Bellemann, A. Berg, J. Bisplinghoff, G. Bohlscheid, J. Ernst, C. Henrich, F. Hinterberger, R. Ibald, R. Jahn, R. Joosten, K. Kilian, A. Kozela, H. Machner, A. Magiera, J. Munkel, P. von Neumann-Cosel, P. von Rossen, H. Schnitker, K. Scho, J. Smyrski, R. Tölle, and C. Wilkin (The COSY-MOMO Collaboration) New experimental data on the p d → He 3 π + π − reaction obtained with the COSY-MOMO detector below the three-pion threshold are presented. The reaction was also studied in inverse kinematics with a deuteron beam and the higher counting rates achieved were especially important at low excess energies. The co… [Phys. Rev. C 94, 034618] Published Thu Sep 29, 2016
    Keywords: Nuclear Reactions
    Print ISSN: 0556-2813
    Electronic ISSN: 1089-490X
    Topics: Physics
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  • 9
    Publication Date: 2012-07-01
    Description: Petrological and geochemical variations within plutons reflect their magmatic and emplacement histories. Here we present new magnetic susceptibility (Km) data on the ~163 Ma Barcroft granodiorite pluton in eastern California, which is exceptionally well exposed, especially in the vertical dimension. The Barcroft pluton offers exposures over a total of 2560 m of elevation and is an appropriate target to investigate variations of magnetic susceptibility. In ferromagnetic plutonic rocks, Km reflects mainly the abundance of magnetite, whereas in paramagnetic plutonic rocks it reflects primarily the abundance of mafic silicates. Magnetic susceptibility is also determined by magmatic processes such as crystal fractionation and by intensive parameters such as oxygen fugacity. Other magmatic processes, including magma replenishment, hybridization, and host-rock assimilation, may also influence Km variations. A first data set is based on 622 core samples that were measured in the laboratory. Our second data set comes from 1960 field measurements collected at 196 stations between ~1600 and 4000 m elevation. Detailed surveys were performed at the outcrop scale to evaluate the impact of the ~100 Ma McAfee Creek intrusion on the Barcroft background magnetic susceptibility. The combined data sets display a broad positive correlation between Km and elevation. Pluton mineralogy also appears to vary with elevation but is more difficult to quantify. At the outcrop scale, small dikes of the McAfee Creek granite transect the pluton and are responsible for a decrease in Km of the host granodioritic rocks toward the dikes due to late-stage magmatic or hydrothermal alteration. A contour map of Km shows a high degree of correlation with local topographic features such as deep canyons. Magnetic susceptibility of the Barcroft mafic rocks varies at the outcrop scale as a result of presence of petrological heterogeneities. However, these small-scale variations are embedded in a broader magnetic susceptibility trend due primarily to elevation, which reflects petrologic stratification of the pluton. The late-magmatic and hydrothermal alterations described in previous studies do not affect the spatial distribution of magnetic susceptibility. We propose that vertical increase of Km was primarily caused by crystal fractionation or another magmatic differentiation mechanism rather than by an externally driven increase in oxygen fugacity toward the roof of the intrusion.
    Print ISSN: 0003-004X
    Electronic ISSN: 1945-3027
    Topics: Geosciences
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  • 10
    Publication Date: 2012-06-20
    Description: Author(s): H. R. Burroughs, B. K. Cogswell, J. Escamilla-Roa, D. C. Latimer, and D. J. Ernst One goal of contemporary particle physics is to determine the mixing angles and mass-squared differences that constitute the phenomenological constants that describe neutrino oscillations. Of great interest are not only the best-fit values of these constants but also their errors. Some of the neutri... [Phys. Rev. C 85, 068501] Published Tue Jun 19, 2012
    Keywords: Electroweak Interaction, Symmetries
    Print ISSN: 0556-2813
    Electronic ISSN: 1089-490X
    Topics: Physics
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