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  • 1
    Publication Date: 2016-02-19
    Description: Sex differences in physiology and disease susceptibility are commonly attributed to developmental and/or hormonal factors, but there is increasing realization that cell-intrinsic mechanisms play important and persistent roles. Here we use the Drosophila melanogaster intestine to investigate the nature and importance of cellular sex in an adult somatic organ in vivo. We find that the adult intestinal epithelium is a cellular mosaic of different sex differentiation pathways, and displays extensive sex differences in expression of genes with roles in growth and metabolism. Cell-specific reversals of the sexual identity of adult intestinal stem cells uncovers the key role this identity has in controlling organ size, reproductive plasticity and response to genetically induced tumours. Unlike previous examples of sexually dimorphic somatic stem cell activity, the sex differences in intestinal stem cell behaviour arise from intrinsic mechanisms that control cell cycle duration and involve a new doublesex- and fruitless-independent branch of the sex differentiation pathway downstream of transformer. Together, our findings indicate that the plasticity of an adult somatic organ is reversibly controlled by its sexual identity, imparted by a new mechanism that may be active in more tissues than previously recognized.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Hudry, Bruno -- Khadayate, Sanjay -- Miguel-Aliaga, Irene -- Medical Research Council/United Kingdom -- England -- Nature. 2016 Feb 18;530(7590):344-8. doi: 10.1038/nature16953.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉MRC Clinical Sciences Centre, Imperial College London, Hammersmith Campus, Du Cane Road, London W12 0NN, UK.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26887495" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Adult Stem Cells/*cytology ; Animals ; Cell Cycle ; Cell Proliferation ; Cell Transformation, Neoplastic ; Dosage Compensation, Genetic ; Drosophila Proteins/metabolism ; Drosophila melanogaster/*anatomy & histology/*cytology/genetics/growth & ; development ; Female ; Intestines/*cytology ; Male ; Nuclear Proteins/metabolism ; *Organ Size ; RNA-Binding Proteins/metabolism ; Reproduction ; Ribonucleoproteins/metabolism ; *Sex Characteristics ; Sex Differentiation/genetics
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 2
    Publication Date: 2014-03-29
    Description: Enhancers control the correct temporal and cell-type-specific activation of gene expression in multicellular eukaryotes. Knowing their properties, regulatory activity and targets is crucial to understand the regulation of differentiation and homeostasis. Here we use the FANTOM5 panel of samples, covering the majority of human tissues and cell types, to produce an atlas of active, in vivo-transcribed enhancers. We show that enhancers share properties with CpG-poor messenger RNA promoters but produce bidirectional, exosome-sensitive, relatively short unspliced RNAs, the generation of which is strongly related to enhancer activity. The atlas is used to compare regulatory programs between different cells at unprecedented depth, to identify disease-associated regulatory single nucleotide polymorphisms, and to classify cell-type-specific and ubiquitous enhancers. We further explore the utility of enhancer redundancy, which explains gene expression strength rather than expression patterns. The online FANTOM5 enhancer atlas represents a unique resource for studies on cell-type-specific enhancers and gene regulation.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Andersson, Robin -- Gebhard, Claudia -- Miguel-Escalada, Irene -- Hoof, Ilka -- Bornholdt, Jette -- Boyd, Mette -- Chen, Yun -- Zhao, Xiaobei -- Schmidl, Christian -- Suzuki, Takahiro -- Ntini, Evgenia -- Arner, Erik -- Valen, Eivind -- Li, Kang -- Schwarzfischer, Lucia -- Glatz, Dagmar -- Raithel, Johanna -- Lilje, Berit -- Rapin, Nicolas -- Bagger, Frederik Otzen -- Jorgensen, Mette -- Andersen, Peter Refsing -- Bertin, Nicolas -- Rackham, Owen -- Burroughs, A Maxwell -- Baillie, J Kenneth -- Ishizu, Yuri -- Shimizu, Yuri -- Furuhata, Erina -- Maeda, Shiori -- Negishi, Yutaka -- Mungall, Christopher J -- Meehan, Terrence F -- Lassmann, Timo -- Itoh, Masayoshi -- Kawaji, Hideya -- Kondo, Naoto -- Kawai, Jun -- Lennartsson, Andreas -- Daub, Carsten O -- Heutink, Peter -- Hume, David A -- Jensen, Torben Heick -- Suzuki, Harukazu -- Hayashizaki, Yoshihide -- Muller, Ferenc -- FANTOM Consortium -- Forrest, Alistair R R -- Carninci, Piero -- Rehli, Michael -- Sandelin, Albin -- MC_PC_U127597124/Medical Research Council/United Kingdom -- MC_UP_1102/1/Medical Research Council/United Kingdom -- R01 DE022969/DE/NIDCR NIH HHS/ -- England -- Nature. 2014 Mar 27;507(7493):455-61. doi: 10.1038/nature12787.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉1] The Bioinformatics Centre, Department of Biology & Biotech Research and Innovation Centre, University of Copenhagen, Ole Maaloes Vej 5, DK-2200 Copenhagen, Denmark [2]. ; 1] Department of Internal Medicine III, University Hospital Regensburg, Franz-Josef-Strauss-Allee 11, 93042 Regensburg, Germany [2] Regensburg Centre for Interventional Immunology (RCI), D-93042 Regensburg, Germany [3]. ; School of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, College of Medical and Dental Sciences, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT, UK. ; The Bioinformatics Centre, Department of Biology & Biotech Research and Innovation Centre, University of Copenhagen, Ole Maaloes Vej 5, DK-2200 Copenhagen, Denmark. ; 1] The Bioinformatics Centre, Department of Biology & Biotech Research and Innovation Centre, University of Copenhagen, Ole Maaloes Vej 5, DK-2200 Copenhagen, Denmark [2] Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599, USA. ; Department of Internal Medicine III, University Hospital Regensburg, Franz-Josef-Strauss-Allee 11, 93042 Regensburg, Germany. ; 1] RIKEN OMICS Science Centre, RIKEN Yokohama Institute, 1-7-22 Suehiro-cho, Tsurumi-ku, Yokohama City, Kanagawa 230-0045, Japan [2] RIKEN Center for Life Science Technologies (Division of Genomic Technologies), RIKEN Yokohama Institute, 1-7-22 Suehiro-cho, Tsurumi-ku, Yokohama City, Kanagawa 230-0045, Japan. ; Centre for mRNP Biogenesis and Metabolism, Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics, C.F. Mollers Alle 3, Building 1130, DK-8000 Aarhus, Denmark. ; 1] The Bioinformatics Centre, Department of Biology & Biotech Research and Innovation Centre, University of Copenhagen, Ole Maaloes Vej 5, DK-2200 Copenhagen, Denmark [2] Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138, USA. ; 1] The Bioinformatics Centre, Department of Biology & Biotech Research and Innovation Centre, University of Copenhagen, Ole Maaloes Vej 5, DK-2200 Copenhagen, Denmark [2] The Finsen Laboratory, Rigshospitalet and Danish Stem Cell Centre (DanStem), University of Copenhagen, Ole Maaloes Vej 5, DK-2200, Denmark. ; Roslin Institute, Edinburgh University, Easter Bush, Midlothian, Edinburgh EH25 9RG, UK. ; Genomics Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road MS 64-121, Berkeley, California 94720, USA. ; EMBL Outstation - Hinxton, European Bioinformatics Institute, Wellcome Trust Genome Campus, Hinxton, Cambridge CB10 1SD, UK. ; 1] RIKEN OMICS Science Centre, RIKEN Yokohama Institute, 1-7-22 Suehiro-cho, Tsurumi-ku, Yokohama City, Kanagawa 230-0045, Japan [2] RIKEN Center for Life Science Technologies (Division of Genomic Technologies), RIKEN Yokohama Institute, 1-7-22 Suehiro-cho, Tsurumi-ku, Yokohama City, Kanagawa 230-0045, Japan [3] RIKEN Preventive Medicine and Diagnosis Innovation Program, RIKEN Yokohama Institute, 1-7-22 Suehiro-cho, Tsurumi-ku, Yokohama City, Kanagawa 230-0045, Japan. ; 1] RIKEN OMICS Science Centre, RIKEN Yokohama Institute, 1-7-22 Suehiro-cho, Tsurumi-ku, Yokohama City, Kanagawa 230-0045, Japan [2] RIKEN Preventive Medicine and Diagnosis Innovation Program, RIKEN Yokohama Institute, 1-7-22 Suehiro-cho, Tsurumi-ku, Yokohama City, Kanagawa 230-0045, Japan. ; Department of Biosciences and Nutrition, Karolinska Institutet, Halsovagen 7, SE-4183 Huddinge, Stockholm, Sweden. ; 1] RIKEN OMICS Science Centre, RIKEN Yokohama Institute, 1-7-22 Suehiro-cho, Tsurumi-ku, Yokohama City, Kanagawa 230-0045, Japan [2] RIKEN Center for Life Science Technologies (Division of Genomic Technologies), RIKEN Yokohama Institute, 1-7-22 Suehiro-cho, Tsurumi-ku, Yokohama City, Kanagawa 230-0045, Japan [3] Department of Biosciences and Nutrition, Karolinska Institutet, Halsovagen 7, SE-4183 Huddinge, Stockholm, Sweden. ; Department of Clinical Genetics, VU University Medical Center, van der Boechorststraat 7, 1081 BT Amsterdam, Netherlands. ; 1] Department of Internal Medicine III, University Hospital Regensburg, Franz-Josef-Strauss-Allee 11, 93042 Regensburg, Germany [2] Regensburg Centre for Interventional Immunology (RCI), D-93042 Regensburg, Germany.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24670763" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: *Atlases as Topic ; Cell Line ; Cells, Cultured ; Cluster Analysis ; Enhancer Elements, Genetic/*genetics ; Gene Expression Regulation/*genetics ; Genetic Predisposition to Disease/genetics ; HeLa Cells ; Humans ; *Molecular Sequence Annotation ; *Organ Specificity ; Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide/genetics ; Promoter Regions, Genetic/genetics ; RNA, Messenger/biosynthesis/genetics ; Transcription Initiation Site ; Transcription Initiation, Genetic
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 3
  • 4
    ISSN: 0021-9673
    Source: Elsevier Journal Backfiles on ScienceDirect 1907 - 2002
    Topics: Chemistry and Pharmacology
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 5
    Electronic Resource
    Electronic Resource
    New York, NY [u.a.] : Wiley-Blackwell
    Yeast 11 (1995), S. 1353-1365 
    ISSN: 0749-503X
    Keywords: yeast ; nitrogen pathway ; chemostat culture ; proton production ; pH ; metabolic model ; control ; Life and Medical Sciences ; Genetics
    Source: Wiley InterScience Backfile Collection 1832-2000
    Topics: Biology
    Notes: In this investigation, a method for the accurate quantitative determination of net proton production or consumption in biological cultures has been devised. Cells are cultured under constant pH conditions. The specific rate of proton production or consumption by the culture (qH+, mmol h-1 per g biomass) is proportional to the mmol of base or acid required to maintain constant pH per unit time, and this equivalence is independent of the buffering capacity of the culture medium.The above method has been applied to chemostat cultures of Candida utilis growing on glucose or glycerol as carbon source, and different nitrogen sources. The results indicate that the nitrogen assimilation pathway alone determines the value of qH+, and a fixed stoichiometric relationship between nitrogen uptake rate qN (meq h-1 per g biomass) and qH+ has been found for each nitrogen source employed. Thus, qH+/qN values of +1, 0 and - 1 were found for ammonium ions, urea and nitrate respectively. Under oxidative metabolism, the contribution of carbon catabolism to the value of qH+ was undetectable.Since qN may be related to growth and production of type 1 compounds in fermentation processes, the parameter qH+ was incorporated into a model of growth and energy metabolism in chemostat culture (Castrillo and Ugalde, Yeast 10, 185-197, 1994), resulting in adequate simulations of experimentally observed culture performance. Thus, it is suggested that qH+ may be employed as a simple and effective control parameter for biotechnological processes involving biomass-related products.
    Additional Material: 4 Ill.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 6
    Publication Date: 2015-12-09
    Description: Journal of the American Chemical Society DOI: 10.1021/jacs.5b10385
    Print ISSN: 0002-7863
    Electronic ISSN: 1520-5126
    Topics: Chemistry and Pharmacology
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  • 7
    Publication Date: 2019
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Published by Springer Nature
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  • 8
    Publication Date: 2019
    Description: Polymeric membranes of poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) and sodium trifluoroacetate (PEO:CF3COONa) combined with different concentrations of aluminum oxide (Al2O3) particles were analyzed by impedance spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and thermogravimetry (TGA). DSC results show changes in the crystalline fraction of PEO when the concentration of Al2O3 is increased. TGA analysis showed thermal stability up to 430 K showing small changes with the addition of alumina particles. The decrease in crystalline fraction for membranes with low Al2O3 concentration is associated with the increase in conductivity of (PEO)10CF3COONa + x wt.% Al2O3 composites.
    Electronic ISSN: 1996-1944
    Topics: Mechanical Engineering, Materials Science, Production Engineering, Mining and Metallurgy, Traffic Engineering, Precision Mechanics
    Published by MDPI
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  • 9
    Publication Date: 2013-10-16
    Description: Journal of the American Chemical Society DOI: 10.1021/ja407332y
    Print ISSN: 0002-7863
    Electronic ISSN: 1520-5126
    Topics: Chemistry and Pharmacology
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  • 10
    Publication Date: 2017-10-26
    Description: Journal of the American Chemical Society DOI: 10.1021/jacs.7b09983
    Print ISSN: 0002-7863
    Electronic ISSN: 1520-5126
    Topics: Chemistry and Pharmacology
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