ALBERT

All Library Books, journals and Electronic Records Telegrafenberg

You have 0 saved results.
Mark results and click the "Add To Watchlist" link in order to add them to this list.
feed icon rss

Your email was sent successfully. Check your inbox.

An error occurred while sending the email. Please try again.

Proceed reservation?

Export
  • 1
    Publication Date: 2019-02-01
    Description: Highlights • New high-resolution bathymetry and MCS images of the Palomares margin are presented. • Main geomorphological and tectonic features along the margin are analyzed. • Bathymetry is mainly controlled by erosive and halokinesis processes. Abstract The Palomares continental margin is located in the southeastern part of Spain. The margin main structure was formed during Miocene times, and it is currently part of the wide deformation zone characterizing the region between the Iberian and African plates, where no well-defined plate boundary occurs. The convergence between these two plates is here accommodated by several structures, including the left lateral strike–slip Palomares Fault. The region is characterized by sparse, low to moderate magnitude (Mw 〈 5.2) shallow instrumental earthquakes, although large historical events have also occurred. To understand the recent tectonic history of the margin we analyze new high-resolution multibeam bathymetry data and re-processed three multichannel seismic reflection profiles crossing the main structures. The analysis of seafloor morphology and associated subsurface structure provides new insights of the active tectonic features of the area. In contrast to other segments of the southeastern Iberian margin, the Palomares margin contains numerous large and comparatively closely spaced canyons with heads that reach near the coast. The margin relief is also characterized by the presence of three prominent igneous submarine ridges that include the Aguilas, Abubacer and Maimonides highs. Erosive processes evidenced by a number of scars, slope failures, gullies and canyon incisions shape the present-day relief of the Palomares margin. Seismic images reveal the deep structure distinguishing between Miocene structures related to the formation of the margin and currently active features, some of which may reactivate inherited structures. The structure of the margin started with an extensional phase accompanied by volcanic accretion during the Serravallian, followed by a compressional pulse that started during the Latemost Tortonian. Nowadays, tectonic activity offshore is subdued and limited to few, minor faults, in comparison with the activity recorded onshore. The deep Algero-Balearic Basin is affected by surficial processes, associated to halokinesis of Messinian evaporites.
    Type: Article , PeerReviewed
    Format: text
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 2
    Publication Date: 2019-02-01
    Description: The Gulf of Cadiz seismicity is characterized by persistent low to intermediate magnitude earthquakes, occasionally punctuated by high magnitude events such as the M ~ 8.7 1755 Great Lisbon earthquake and the M = 7.9 event of February 28th, 1969. Micro-seismicity was recorded during 11 months by a temporary network of 25 ocean bottom seismometers (OBSs) in an area of high seismic activity, encompassing the potential source areas of the mentioned large magnitude earthquakes. We combined micro-seismicity analysis with processing and interpretation of deep crustal seismic reflection profiles and available refraction data to investigate the possible tectonic control of the seismicity in the Gulf of Cadiz area. Three controlling mechanisms are explored: i) active tectonic structures, ii) transitions between different lithospheric domains and inherited Mesozoic structures, and iii) fault weakening mechanisms. Our results show that micro-seismicity is mostly located in the upper mantle and is associated with tectonic inversion of extensional rift structures and to the transition between different lithospheric/rheological domains. Even though the crustal structure is well imaged in the seismic profiles and in the bathymetry, crustal faults show low to negligible seismic activity. A possible explanation for this is that the crustal thrusts are thin-skinned structures rooting in relatively shallow sub-horizontal décollements associated with (aseismic) serpentinization levels at the top of the lithospheric mantle. Therefore, co-seismic slip along crustal thrusts may only occur during large magnitude events, while for most of the inter-seismic cycle these thrusts remain locked, or slip aseismically. We further speculate that high magnitude earthquake's ruptures may only nucleate in the lithospheric mantle and then propagate into the crust across the serpentinized layers.
    Type: Article , PeerReviewed
    Format: text
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 3
    facet.materialart.
    Unknown
    Nature Publishing Group
    In:  Scientific Reports, 8 (13015).
    Publication Date: 2019-02-01
    Description: What process triggered the Mediterranean Sea restriction remains debated since the discovery of the Messinian Salinity Crisis (MSC). Recent hypotheses infer that the MSC initiated after the closure of the Atlantic-Mediterranean Betic and Rifean corridors, being modulated through restriction at the Gibraltar Strait. These hypotheses however, do not integrate contemporaneous speciation patterns of the faunal exchange between Iberia and Africa and geological features like the evaporite distribution. Exchange of terrestrial biota occurred before, during and after the MSC, and speciation models support an exchange path across the East Alborán basin (EAB) located a few hundreds of km east of the Gibraltar Strait. Yet, a structure explaining jointly geological and biological observations has remained undiscovered. We present new seismic data showing the velocity structure of a well-differentiated 14-17-km thick volcanic arc in the EAB. Isostatic considerations support that the arc-crust buoyancy created an archipelago and filter bridge across the EAB. Sub-aerial erosional unconformities and onlap relationships support that the arc was active between ~10-6 Ma. Progressive arc build-up leading to an archipelago and its later subsidence can explain the extended exchange of terrestrial biota between Iberia and Africa (~7-3 Ma), and agrees with patterns of biota speciation and terrestrial fossil distribution before the MSC (10-6.2 Ma). In this scenario, the West Alboran Basin (WAB) could then be the long-postulated open-marine refuge for the Mediterranean taxa that repopulated the Mediterranean after the MSC, connected to the deep restricted Mediterranean basin through a sill at the Alboran volcanic arc archipelago.
    Type: Article , PeerReviewed
    Format: text
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 4
    Publication Date: 2017-11-19
    Description: The Gulf of Cadiz seismicity is characterized by persistent low to intermediate magnitude earthquakes, occasionally punctuated by high magnitude events such as the M ~ 8.7 1755 Great Lisbon earthquake and the M = 7.9 event of February 28th, 1969. Micro-seismicity was recorded during 11 months by a temporary network of 25 ocean bottom seismometers (OBSs) in an area of high seismic activity, encompassing the potential source areas of the mentioned large magnitude earthquakes. We combined micro-seismicity analysis with processing and interpretation of deep crustal seismic reflection profiles and available refraction data to investigate the possible tectonic control of the seismicity in the Gulf of Cadiz area. Three controlling mechanisms are explored: i) active tectonic structures, ii) transitions between different lithospheric domains and inherited Mesozoic structures, and iii) fault weakening mechanisms. Our results show that micro-seismicity is mostly located in the upper mantle and is associated with tectonic inversion of extensional rift structures and to the transition between different lithospheric/rheological domains. Even though the crustal structure is well imaged in the seismic profiles and in the bathymetry, crustal faults show low to negligible seismic activity. A possible explanation for this is that the crustal thrusts are thin-skinned structures rooting in relatively shallow sub-horizontal décollements associated with (aseismic) serpentinization levels at the top of the lithospheric mantle. Therefore, co-seismic slip along crustal thrusts may only occur during large magnitude events, while for most of the inter-seismic cycle these thrusts remain locked, or slip aseismically. We further speculate that high magnitude earthquake's ruptures may only nucleate in the lithospheric mantle and then propagate into the crust across the serpentinized layers.
    Repository Name: EPIC Alfred Wegener Institut
    Type: Article , NonPeerReviewed
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 5
    Publication Date: 2017-07-21
    Description: Pre-Permian sedimentary basins in the southeastern North Sea have been previously interpreted from potential field data but only poorly imaged on seismic sections due to the presence of salt layers and a thick Mesozoic and Cenozoic cover. Furthermore, potentially low prospectivity for hydrocarbon resources has resulted in sparse penetration of Pre-Permian sediments in the southeastern North Sea. We present images of large Palaeozoic basins obtained through reprocessing and pre-stack depth migration of seismic data from the MONA LISA project. The depth images show in detail the structure of pre-Permian basins beneath the Danish basin and the Ringkøbing-Fyn High, providing new insights into Upper Palaeozoic basin formation in the North Sea.
    Type: Article , PeerReviewed
    Format: text
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 6
    facet.materialart.
    Unknown
    Elsevier
    In:  Marine Geology, 203 (3-4). pp. 303-317.
    Publication Date: 2017-07-28
    Description: Slope failure along the Costa Rica convergent margin commonly results from steepening of the continental slope above underthrust relief on the subducting plate. The 50-km-wide prehistoric Nicoya Slump was a big event that was followed by small slides from its headwall. Estimated maximum wave height above the slide is 27 m. The headwall occurs along a tectonized and unstable zone that extends northwest. An expected great earthquake in the adjacent Nicoya seismic gap could trigger future tsunamigenic landslides along this zone. The central Nicaragua slope, where the 1992 tsunamigenic earthquake occurred, has failed from steepening by tectonic erosion and perhaps subducting relief. The steep middle slope displays several large slide scars, each of which had the potential to generate a 6–7-m-high wave. A relation between the youngest slide and the 1992 earthquake is uncertain. Principal causes of landslides off Middle America were tectonic steepening and elevated fluid pressure. A mid-slope tectonized zone off Costa Rica allowed detachment of a huge slump involving the entire lower slope to the plate boundary. It may pose a hazard during rupture of the Nicoya locked zone.
    Type: Article , PeerReviewed
    Format: text
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 7
    Publication Date: 2018-07-17
    Description: We present depth images, from portions of profiles that are close to flow-lines, of Cretaceous oceanic crust in the eastern Central Atlantic. Compared with post-stack time migrations, the images illustrate the improvement resulting from the application of pre-stack depth migration. The images document the scale and geometry of normal faulting in oceanic crust formed over 25 Myr at a half-spreading rate of less than 10 mm yr−1, and the variation in extensional style with position within the spreading segment. Away from major fault zones (FZs), most faults are subplanar, dip more than 35°, are associated with moderate basement relief (0.2–1 km relief) and may penetrate to deep crustal levels. These faults could be related to the lifting of the lithosphere out of the median valley to the flanking mountains. Also observed away from FZs are gently dipping to subhorizontal reflections in the upper crust, which resemble detachment faults. In contrast, the inside corner crust is more rugged, with basement highs rising up to 2 km above the intervening basins. This larger-scale topography is associated with a different style of faulting: the depth images reveal gently dipping (〈35°) faults that are rooted in the deep crust and that project to the ridgeward flank of the dome-shaped large basement highs (1–2 km vertical relief). The faults seem to continue as the ridge-facing flank of these highs and some may extend over the crest of the high to breakaways beyond. In this case, the domal highs that form the exhumed footwall to the faults can be described as oceanic core complexes. These controlling faults are up to 20 km long and have a heave of ∼10 km, sufficient to have accommodated up to 50 per cent extension and to have exhumed deep crustal and perhaps even mantle rocks. We suggest that similar faults can explain the structure and lithologies found at megamullion structures (oceanic core complexes) at inside corners near the present-day spreading ridge.
    Type: Article , PeerReviewed
    Format: text
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 8
    facet.materialart.
    Unknown
    AGU / Wiley
    In:  Journal of Geophysical Research: Solid Earth, 110 . B06101.
    Publication Date: 2019-04-08
    Description: Subduction erosion has dominated the evolution of the north Chile convergent continental margin since at least the Mesozoic. We investigate the structure of the Antofagasta (23°S) sector of this margin along a transect using coincident wide-angle and near-vertical seismic profiling and gravity data. A 2-D velocity field of the overriding and subducting plates was obtained using joint refraction and reflection travel time tomography. A velocity-derived density distribution was used to model marine gravity data and substantiate the velocity model. The gravity and velocity models imply that the overriding plate is mainly made of arc-type igneous basement. The upper plate is constructed of two main rock bodies separated by a subhorizontal layer defined by a velocity inversion, the top coincident with a reflection in near-vertical seismic images. The seismic boundary is interpreted as a detachment separating an upper extended domain with large-scale normal faulting from a lower domain apparently undergoing a different type of deformation. Velocity-derived porosity indicates that the front of the margin is probably fluid-saturated and disaggregated by fracturation as a consequence of frontal subduction erosion. Fluids carried into the subduction channel within slope debris filling underthrusting grabens reduce basal friction and probably induce hydrofracturing and basal erosion along the underside of the overriding plate. At depths greater than ∼20 km, porosity and density values imply that most fluids have been exhausted and the lower part of the upper plate is structurally coherent and little fractured. The change in physical properties leads to increased mechanical coupling along the plate boundary and occurs at the updip limit of the distribution of aftershocks of the 1995 Antofagasta earthquake (M w = 8.0) defining the seismogenic zone.
    Type: Article , PeerReviewed
    Format: text
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 9
    Publication Date: 2016-06-15
    Description: The southern Chilean convergent margin, between 50° and 57° S, is shaped by the interaction of the three main plates: Antarctic, South America and Scotia. North of 53° S, the convergence between Antarctic and South America plates is close to orthogonal to the continental margin strike. Here, the deformational style of the accretionary prism is mainly characterized by seaward-verging thrusts and locally by normal faults and fractures, a very limited lateral extension of prism, a very shallow dip (∼ 6°) décollement, and subduction of a thick and relatively undeformed trench sedimentary sequence. South of 53° S, convergence is oblique to the margin, locally, the trench sediments are proto-deformed by double vergence thrusting and the front of the prism grows through landward-verging thrusting. The décollement is sub-horizontal and deep, involving most of the sediment over the oceanic crust in the accretionary process, building a comparatively wide and thicker prism. A Bottom Simulating Reflector is present across the whole prism to the abyssal plan, suggesting the presence of gas in the sediments. The analysis of P- and S-wave velocity reflectivity sections, derived by amplitude versus offset technique (AVO), detailed velocity information and the velocity-derived sediment porosity have been integrated with the structural analysis of the accretionary prism of two selected pre-stack depth migrated seismic lines, aiming to explain the relation between fluid circulation and tectonics. Accretion along double vergence thrust faults may be associated with the presence of overpressured fluid, which decreases the effective shear stress coefficient along the main décollement and within the sediments, and modify the rheolgical properties of rocks. The presence of an adequate drainage network, represented by interconnected faults and fractures affecting the entire sedimentary sequence, can favour the escape of pore fluid toward the sea bottom, while, less permeable and not faulted sediments can favour fluid accumulations. Gravitational and tectonic dewatering, and stratigraphy could control the consolidation and the pore overpressure of sediments involved in subduction along the trench. The results of our analysis suggest the existence of a feedback between tectonic style and fluid circulation.
    Type: Article , PeerReviewed
    Format: text
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 10
    facet.materialart.
    Unknown
    In:  [Poster] In: AGU Fall Meeting, 15.12.-19.12, San Francisco, California, USA .
    Publication Date: 2012-02-23
    Type: Conference or Workshop Item , NonPeerReviewed
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
Close ⊗
This website uses cookies and the analysis tool Matomo. More information can be found here...