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  • 1
    Publication Date: 2005
    Keywords: Seismology ; Lithosphere ; Asthenosphere ; Rheology ; earth mantle ; Plate tectonics ; Iceland ; EPSL
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  • 2
    Publication Date: 2016-04-16
    Description: We introduce a method for mapping the noise-source distribution of microseisms which uses information from the full length of covariograms (cross-correlations). We derive a forward calculation based on the plane-wave assumption in 2-D, to formulate an iterative, linearized inversion of covariogram envelopes in the time domain. The forward calculation involves bandpass filtering of the covariograms. The inversion exploits the well-known feature of noise cross-correlation, that is, an anomaly in the noise field that is oblique to the interstation direction appears as cross-correlation amplitude at a smaller time lag than the in-line, surface wave arrival. Therefore, the inversion extracts more information from the covariograms than that contained at the expected surface wave arrival, and this allows us to work with few stations to find the propagation directions of incoming energy. The inversion is naturally applied to data that retain physical units that are not amplitude normalized in any way. By dividing a network into groups of stations, we can constrain the source location by triangulation. We demonstrate results of the method with synthetic data and one year (2012) of data from the Swedish National Seismic Network and also look at the seasonal variation of source distribution around Scandinavia. After preprocessing and cross-correlation, the stations are divided into five groups of 9–12 stations. We invert the envelopes of each group in eight period ranges between 2 and 25 s. Results show that the noise sources at short periods (less than 12 s) lie predominantly in the North Atlantic Ocean and the Barents Sea, and at longer periods the energy appears to have a broader distribution. The strongly anisotropic source distribution in this area is estimated to cause significant biases of velocity measurements compared to the level of heterogeneity in the region. The amplitude of the primary microseisms varies little over the year, but secondary microseisms are much weaker in summer than in winter. Furthermore, the peak period of the secondary microseisms shifts from 5–6 s in winter to 4–5 s during the summer.
    Keywords: Seismology
    Print ISSN: 0956-540X
    Electronic ISSN: 1365-246X
    Topics: Geosciences
    Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Deutsche Geophysikalische Gesellschaft (DGG) and the Royal Astronomical Society (RAS).
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  • 3
    Publication Date: 2017-01-07
    Description: A double-correlation method is introduced to locate tremor sources based on stacks of complex, doubly-correlated tremor records of multiple triplets of seismographs back projected to hypothetical source locations in a geographic grid. Peaks in the resulting stack of moduli are inferred source locations. The stack of the moduli is a robust measure of energy radiated from a point source or point sources even when the velocity information is imprecise. Application to real data shows how double correlation focuses the source mapping compared to the common single correlation approach. Synthetic tests demonstrate the robustness of the method and its resolution limitations which are controlled by the station geometry, the finite frequency of the signal, the quality of the used velocity information and noise level. Both random noise and signal or noise correlated at time shifts that are inconsistent with the assumed velocity structure can be effectively suppressed. Assuming a surface wave velocity, we can constrain the source location even if the surface wave component does not dominate. The method can also in principle be used with body waves in 3-D, although this requires more data and seismographs placed near the source for depth resolution.
    Keywords: Seismology
    Print ISSN: 0956-540X
    Electronic ISSN: 1365-246X
    Topics: Geosciences
    Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Deutsche Geophysikalische Gesellschaft (DGG) and the Royal Astronomical Society (RAS).
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  • 4
    Publication Date: 2016-10-09
    Description: Relative location methods are commonly used to precisely locate earthquake clusters consisting of similar waveforms. Repeating waveforms are often recorded at volcanoes, where, however, the crust structure is expected to contain strong heterogeneities and therefore the 1-D velocity model assumption that is made in most location strategies is not likely to describe reality. A peculiar cluster of repeating low-frequency seismic events was recorded on the south flank of Katla volcano (Iceland) from 2011. As the hypocentres are located at the rim of the glacier, the seismicity may be due to volcanic or glacial processes. Information on the size and shape of the cluster may help constraining the source process. The extreme similarity of waveforms points to a very small spatial distribution of hypocentres. In order to extract meaningful information about size and shape of the cluster, we minimize uncertainty by optimizing the cross-correlation measurements and relative-location process. With a synthetic test we determine the best parameters for differential-time measurements and estimate their uncertainties, specifically for each waveform. We design a location strategy to work without a pre-defined velocity model, by formulating and inverting the problem to seek changes in both location and slowness, thus accounting for azimuth, take-off angles and velocity deviations from a 1-D model. We solve the inversion explicitly in order to propagate data errors through the calculation. With this approach we are able to resolve a source volume few tens of metres wide in horizontal directions and around 100 metres in depth. There is no suggestion that the hypocentres lie on a single fault plane and the depth distribution indicates that their source is unlikely to be related to glacial processes as the ice thickness is not expected to exceed few tens of metres in the source area. Our method is designed for a very small source region, allowing us to assume a constant slowness for the whole cluster and to include the effects of 3-D heterogeneity such as refraction. Similar circumstances may arise in other volcanic regions with a high level of heterogeneity and where densely clustered earthquakes are often recorded.
    Keywords: Seismology
    Print ISSN: 0956-540X
    Electronic ISSN: 1365-246X
    Topics: Geosciences
    Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Deutsche Geophysikalische Gesellschaft (DGG) and the Royal Astronomical Society (RAS).
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