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  • 1
    Electronic Resource
    Electronic Resource
    [s.l.] : Nature Publishing Group
    Nature 371 (1994), S. 60-62 
    ISSN: 1476-4687
    Source: Nature Archives 1869 - 2009
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Notes: [Auszug] Plant water use (transpiration, E) is regulated by the available energy (Rn) and air saturation deficit (D) above the canopy (Fig. \a}. The relative importance of these two factors in regulating plant or ecosystem water use is theoretically summarized in a decoupling coefficient, Q, (OQ 1) derived ...
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  • 2
    ISSN: 1573-5052
    Keywords: Canopy ; Evaporation ; Leaf area index ; Scaling ; Surface conductance ; Stomata
    Source: Springer Online Journal Archives 1860-2000
    Topics: Biology
    Notes: Abstract We examine conductances for evaporation from both vegetation and soil in response to environmental variables. Data from a vertically-structured pristine forest of Nothofagus are presented as an example of the effects of biodiversity on the scaling of conductances between tiers of plant organisation. Available data sets of maximum leaf stomatal conductances (g lmax ) and bulk vegetation surface conductances (G smax ) are compared. Overall, the ratio G smax /g lmax is consistently close to 3 for seven major vegetation types of diverse structure. An analytical model accounts for this close relationship, and in particular how G smax is conservative against changes in leaf area index because of the compensating decrease in plant canopy transpiration and increase in soil evaporation as leaf area index diminishes. The model is also successfully tested by comparison with canopy conductances of emergent trees measured in the Nothofagus forest. The constraint of vegetation surface conductance and evaporation via environmental regulation by irradiance, air saturation deficit and root zone water supply are discussed.
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  • 3
    ISSN: 1365-3040
    Source: Blackwell Publishing Journal Backfiles 1879-2005
    Topics: Biology
    Notes: The three dimensional distribution of intercepted radiation, intercellular CO2 concentration (Ci) and late summer needle nitrogen (N) concentration were determined at the tips of all 54 branches in a 6·2-m-tall Pinus radiata D. Don tree growing in a New Zealand plantation. Measurements included above- and below-canopy irradiance, leaf stable carbon isotopic composition (δ13C) and tree canopy architecture. The radiation absorption component of the model, MAESTRO, was tested on site and then used to determine the branch tip distribution of intercepted radiation. We hypothesized that in branch tip needles: (i) the allocation of nitrogen and other nutrients would be closely associated with the distribution of intercepted radiation, reflecting carbon gain optimization theory, and (ii) Ci would predominantly reflect changes in photosynthetic rate (A) rather than stomatal conductance (gs), indicating that the increase in A for a given increase in N concentration was larger than the corresponding increase in gs. Needle nitrogen concentration was poorly related to intercepted radiation, regardless of the period over which the latter was calculated. At a given height, there was a large azimuthal variation in intercepted radiation but N concentration was remarkably uniform around the tree canopy. There was, however, a linear and positive correspondence between N concentration and δ13C and needle height above ground (r2 = 0·73 and 0·68, respectively). The very strong linear correspondence between N concentration and Ci (r2 = 0·71) was interpreted, using gas exchange measurements, as supporting our second hypothesis. Recognizing the strong apical control in P. radiata and possible effects of leaf nitrogen storage in an evergreen species, we propose that the tree leader must have constituted a very strong carbon sink throughout the growing season, and that the proximity of branch tip needles to the leader affected their photosynthetic capacity and nutrient concentration, independent of intercepted radiation. This implies an integrated internal determination of resource allocation within the tree and challenges the current convention that resources are optimally distributed according to the profile of intercepted radiation.
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  • 4
    ISSN: 1365-3040
    Source: Blackwell Publishing Journal Backfiles 1879-2005
    Topics: Biology
    Notes: Responses of photosynthesis (A) to intercellular CO2 concentration (ci) in 2-year-old Pinus radiata D. Don seedlings were measured at a range of temperatures in order to parametrize a biophysical model of leaf photosynthesis. Increasing leaf temperature from 8 to 30°C caused a 4-fold increase in Vcmax, the maximum rate of carboxylation (10.7–43.3 μol m−2 s−1 and a 3-fold increase in Jmax, the maximum electron transport rate (20.5–60.2 μmol m −2 s−1). The temperature optimum for Jmax was lower than that for Vcmax, causing a decline in the ratio Jmax:Vcmax from 2.0 to 1.4 as leaf temperature increased from 8 to 30°C. To determine the response of photosynthesis to leaf nitrogen concentration, additional measurements were made on seedlings grown under four nitrogen treatments. Foliar N concentrations varied between 0.36 and 1.27 mol kg−1, and there were linear relationships between N concentration and both Vcmax and Jmax. Measurements made throughout the crown of a plantation forest tree, where foliar N concentrations varied from 0.83 mol kg−1 near the base to 1.54 mol kg−1 near the leader, yielded similar relationships. These results will be useful in scaling carbon assimilation models from leaves to canopies.
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  • 5
    ISSN: 1365-3040
    Source: Blackwell Publishing Journal Backfiles 1879-2005
    Topics: Biology
    Notes: A model is presented which solves simultaneously for leaf-scale stomatal conductance, CO2 assimilation and the energy balance as a function of leaf position within canopies of well-watered vegetation. Fluxes and conductances were calculated separately for sunlit and shaded leaves. A linear dependence of photosynthetic capacity on leaf nitrogen content was assumed, while leaf nitrogen content and light intensity were assumed to decrease exponentially within canopies. Separate extinction coefficients were used for diffuse and direct beam radiation. An efficient Gaussian integration technique was used to compute fluxes and mean conductances for the canopy. The multilayer model synthesizes current knowledge of radiation penetration, leaf physiology and the physics of evaporation and provides insights into the response of whole canopies to multiple, interacting factors. The model was also used to explore sources of variation in the slopes of two simple parametric models (nitrogen- and light-use efficiency), and to set bounds on the magnitudes of the parameters.For canopies low in total N, daily assimilation rates are ∼10% lower when leaf N is distributed uniformly than when the same total N is distributed according to the exponentially decreasing profile of absorbed radiation. However, gains are negligible for plants with high N concentrations. Canopy conductance, Gc should be calculated as Gc=Aσ(fslgsl+fshgsh), where Δ is leaf area index, fsi and fsh are the fractions of sunlit and shaded leaves at each level, and gsi and gsh are the corresponding stomatal conductances. Simple addition of conductances without this weighting causes errors in transpiration calculated using the ‘big-leaf’ version of the Penman-Monteith equation. Partitioning of available energy between sensible and latent heat is very responsive to the parameter describing the sensitivity of stomata to the atmospheric humidity deficit. This parameter also affects canopy conductance, but has a relatively small impact on canopy assimilation.Simple parametric models are useful for extrapolating understanding from small to large scales, but the complexity of real ecosystems is thus subsumed in unexplained variations in parameter values. Simulations with the multilayer model show that both nitrogen- and radiation-use efficiencies depend on plant nutritional status and the diffuse component of incident radiation, causing a 2- to 3-fold variation in these efficiencies.
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  • 6
    ISSN: 1365-2486
    Source: Blackwell Publishing Journal Backfiles 1879-2005
    Topics: Biology , Energy, Environment Protection, Nuclear Power Engineering , Geography
    Notes: Based on review and original data, this synthesis investigates carbon pools and fluxes of Siberian and European forests (600 and 300 million ha, respectively). We examine the productivity of ecosystems, expressed as positive rate when the amount of carbon in the ecosystem increases, while (following micrometeorological convention) downward fluxes from the atmosphere to the vegetation (NEE = Net Ecosystem Exchange) are expressed as negative numbers. Productivity parameters are Net Primary Productivity (NPP=whole plant growth), Net Ecosystem Productivity (NEP = CO2 assimilation minus ecosystem respiration), and Net Biome Productivity (NBP = NEP minus carbon losses through disturbances bypassing respiration, e.g. by fire and logging). Based on chronosequence studies and national forestry statistics we estimate a low average NPP for boreal forests in Siberia: 123 gC m–2 y–1. This contrasts with a similar calculation for Europe which suggests a much higher average NPP of 460 gC m–2 y–1 for the forests there. Despite a smaller area, European forests have a higher total NPP than Siberia (1.2–1.6 vs. 0.6–0.9 × 1015 gC region–1 y–1). This arises as a consequence of differences in growing season length, climate and nutrition. For a chronosequence of Pinus sylvestris stands studied in central Siberia during summer, NEE was most negative in a 67-y old stand regenerating after fire (– 192 mmol m–2 d–1) which is close to NEE in a cultivated forest of Germany (– 210 mmol m–2 d–1). Considerable net ecosystem CO2-uptake was also measured in Siberia in 200- and 215-y old stands (NEE:174 and – 63 mmol m–2 d–1) while NEP of 7- and 13-y old logging areas were close to the ecosystem compensation point. Two Siberian bogs and a bog in European Russia were also significant carbon sinks (– 102 to – 104 mmol m–2 d–1). Integrated over a growing season (June to September) we measured a total growing season NEE of – 14 mol m–2 summer–1 (– 168 gC m–2 summer–1) in a 200-y Siberian pine stand and – 5 mol m–2 summer–1 (– 60 gC m–2 summer–1) in Siberian and European Russian bogs. By contrast, over the same period, a spruce forest in European Russia was a carbon source to the atmosphere of (NEE: + 7 mol m–2 summer–1 = + 84 gC m–2 summer–1). Two years after a windthrow in European Russia, with all trees being uplifted and few successional species, lost 16 mol C m–2 to the atmosphere over a 3-month in summer, compared to the cumulative NEE over a growing season in a German forest of – 15.5 mol m–2 summer–1 (– 186 gC m–2 summer–1; European flux network annual averaged – 205 gC m–2 y–1). Differences in CO2-exchange rates coincided with differences in the Bowen ratio, with logging areas partitioning most incoming radiation into sensible heat whereas bogs partitioned most into evaporation (latent heat). Effects of these different surface energy exchanges on local climate (convective storms and fires) and comparisons with the Canadian BOREAS experiment are discussed. Following a classification of disturbances and their effects on ecosystem carbon balances, fire and logging are discussed as the main processes causing carbon losses that bypass heterotrophic respiration in Siberia. Following two approaches, NBP was estimated to be only about 13–16 mmol m–2 y–1 for Siberia. It may reach 67 mmol m–2 y–1 in North America, and about 140–400 mmol m–2 y–1 in Scandinavia. We conclude that fire speeds up the carbon cycle, but that it results also in long-term carbon sequestration by charcoal formation. For at least 14 years after logging, regrowth forests remain net sources of CO2 to the atmosphere. This has important implications regarding the effects of Siberian forest management on atmospheric concentrations. For many years after logging has taken place, regrowth forests remain weaker sinks for atmospheric CO2 than are nearby old-growth forests.
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  • 7
    ISSN: 1365-2486
    Source: Blackwell Publishing Journal Backfiles 1879-2005
    Topics: Biology , Energy, Environment Protection, Nuclear Power Engineering , Geography
    Notes: We used a combination of eddy flux, chamber and environmental measurements with an integrated suite of models to analyse the seasonality of net ecosystem carbon uptake (FCO2) in an 8-year-old, closed canopy Pinus radiata D.Don plantation in New Zealand (42°52′ S, 172°45′ E). The analyses utilized a biochemically based, big-leaf model of tree canopy photosynthesis (Ac), coupled to multiplicative environmental-constraint functions of canopy stomatal conductance (Gc) via environmental measurements, a temperature-dependent model of ecosystem respiration (Reco), and a soil water balance model. Available root zone water storage capacity at the measurement site is limited to about 50 mm for the very stony soil, and annual precipitation is only 660 mm, distributed evenly throughout the year. Accordingly the site is prone to soil moisture deficit throughout the summer. G c and Ac obtained maximum rates early in the growing season when plentiful soil water supply was associated with sufficient quantum irradiance (Qabs), and moderate air saturation deficit (D) and temperature (T). From late spring onwards, soil water deficit and D confined Gc and Ac congruously, which together with the solely temperature dependency of Reco resulted in the pronounced seasonality in FCO2. Reflecting a light-limitation of Ac in the closed canopy, modelled annual carbon (C) uptake was most sensitive to changes in Qabs. However, Qabs did not vary significantly between years, and changes in annual FCO2 were mostly due to variability in summer rainfall and D. Annual C-uptake of the forest was 717 g C m–2 in a near-average rainfall year, exceeding by one third the net uptake in a year with 20% less than average rainfall (515 g C m–2).
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  • 8
    ISSN: 1432-1939
    Keywords: Canopy conductance ; Canopy transpiration ; Xylem sap flow ; Humidity response of stomatal ; Nothofagus
    Source: Springer Online Journal Archives 1860-2000
    Topics: Biology
    Notes: Summary Tree transpiration was determined by xylem sap flow and eddy correlation measurements in a temperate broad-leaved forest of Nothofagus in New Zealand (tree height: up to 36 m, one-sided leaf area index: 7). Measurements were carried out on a plot which had similar stem circumference and basal area per ground area as the stand. Plot sap flux density agreed with tree canopy transpiration rate determined by the difference between above-canopy eddy correlation and forest floor lysimeter evaporation measurements. Daily sap flux varied by an order of magnitude among trees (2 to 87 kg day−1 tree−1). Over 50% of plot sap flux density originated from 3 of 14 trees which emerged 2 to 5 m above the canopy. Maximum tree transpiration rate was significantly correlated with tree height, stem sapwood area, and stem circumference. Use of water stored in the trees was minimal. It is estimated that during growth and crown development, Nothofagus allocates about 0.06 m of circumference of main tree trunk or 0.01 m2 of sapwood per kg of water transpired over one hour. Maximum total conductance for water vapour transfer (including canopy and aerodynamic conductance) of emergent trees, calculated from sap flux density and humidity measurements, was 9.5 mm s−1 that is equivalent to 112 mmol m−2 s−1 at the scale of the leaf. Artificially illuminated shoots measured in the stand with gas exchange chambers had maximum stomatal conductances of 280 mmol m−2 s−1 at the top and 150 mmol m−2 s−1 at the bottom of the canopy. The difference between canopy and leaf-level measurements is discussed with respect to effects of transpiration on humidity within the canopy. Maximum total conductance was significantly correlated with leaf nitrogen content. Mean carbon isotope ratio was −27.76±0.27‰ (average ±s.e.) indicating a moist environment. The effects of interactions between the canopy and the atmosphere on forest water use dynamics are shown by a fourfold variation in coupling of the tree canopy air saturation deficit to that of the overhead atmosphere on a typical fine day due to changes in stomatal conductance.
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  • 9
    ISSN: 1432-1939
    Keywords: Evaporation ; Aerodynamic conductance ; Canopy conductance ; Humidity response ; Soil water
    Source: Springer Online Journal Archives 1860-2000
    Topics: Biology
    Notes: Abstract Canopy-scale evaporation rate (E) and derived surface and aerodynamic conductances for the transfer of water vapour (gs and ga, respectively) are reviewed for coniferous forests and grasslands. Despite the extremes of canopy structure, the two vegetation types have similar maximum hourly evaporation rates (E max) and maximum surface conductances (gsmax) (medians = 0.46 mm h-1 and 22 mm s-1). However, on a daily basis, median E max of coniferous forest (4.0 mm d-1) is significantly lower than that of grassland (4.6 mm d-1). Additionally, a representative value of ga for coniferous forest (200 mm s-1) is an order of magnitude more than the corresponding value for grassland (25 mm s-1). The proportional sensitivity of E, calculated by the Penman-Monteith equation, to changes in gs is 〉0.7 for coniferous forest, but as low as 0.3 for grassland. The proportional sensitivity of E to changes in ga is generally ±0.15 or less. Boundary-line relationships between gs and light and air saturation deficit (D) vary considerably. Attainment of gsmax occurs at a much lower irradiance for coniferous forest than for grassland (15 versus about 45% of full sunlight). Relationships between gs and D measured above the canopy appear to be fairly uniform for coniferous forest, but are variable for grassland. More uniform relationships may be found for surfaces with relatively small ga, like grassland, by using D at the evaporating surface (D0) as the independent variable rather than D at a reference point above the surface. An analytical expression is given for determining D0 from measurable quantities. Evaporation rate also depends on the availability of water in the root zone. Below a critical value of soil water storage, the ratio of evaporation rate to the available energy tends to decrease sharply and linearly with decreasing soil water content. At the lowest value of soil water content, this ratio declines by up to a factor of 4 from the non-soil-water-limiting plateau. Knowledge about functional rooting depth of different plant species remains rather limited. Ignorance of this important variable makes it generally difficult to obtain accurate estimates of seasonal evaporation from terrestrial ecosystems.
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  • 10
    ISSN: 0066-4162
    Source: Annual Reviews Electronic Back Volume Collection 1932-2001ff
    Topics: Biology
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