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  • Articles  (3)
  • 1
    Publication Date: 2017-05-04
    Description: The impact of anthropogenic ocean acidification (OA) on marine ecosystems is a vital concern facing marine scientists and managers of ocean resources. Euthecosomatous pteropods (holoplanktonic gastropods) represent an excellent sentinel for indicating exposure to anthropogenic OA because of the sensitivity of their aragonite shells to the OA conditions less favorable for calcification. However, an integration of observations, experiments and modelling efforts is needed to make accurate predictions of how these organisms will respond to future changes to their environment. Our understanding of the underlying organismal biology and life history is far from complete and must be improved if we are to comprehend fully the responses of these organisms to the multitude of stressors in their environment beyond OA. This review considers the present state of research and understanding of euthecosomatous pteropod biology and ecology of these organisms and considers promising new laboratory methods, advances in instrumentation (such as molecular, trace elements, stable isotopes, palaeobiology alongside autonomous sampling platforms, CT scanning and high-quality video recording) and novel field-based approaches (i.e. studies of upwelling and CO2 vent regions) that may allow us to improve our predictive capacity of their vulnerability and/or resilience. In addition to playing a critical ecological and biogeochemical role, pteropods can offer a significant value as an early-indicator of anthropogenic OA. This role as a sentinel species should be developed further to onsolidate their potential use within marine environmental management policy making.
    Repository Name: EPIC Alfred Wegener Institut
    Type: Article , NonPeerReviewed
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  • 2
    Publication Date: 2019-01-23
    Description: Assessing the physicochemical variability of the deeper ocean is currently hampered by limited instrumental time series and proxy records. Bamboo corals (Isididae) form a cosmopolitan family of calcitic deep sea corals that could fill this information gap via geochemical information recorded in their skeletons. Here we evaluate the suitability of high-resolution chemical imaging of bamboo coral skeletons for temperature and nutrient reconstruction. The applied elemental mapping techniques allow to verify the suitability of the chosen transect on the sample section for paleo-reconstructions and enhance the statistical precision of the reconstruction. We measured Mg/Ca via electron microprobe at 1 μm resolution and Ba/Ca via laser ablation ICP-MS at 35 μm resolution in a historic specimen of Keratoisis grayi from the Blake Plateau off Eastern Florida. Long-term growth temperatures of 7.1 ± 3.4 °C (2SD) that are in agreement with recent ambient temperature range can be reconstructed from Mg/Ca ratios provided that anomalously Mg-enriched structural features around the central axis and isolated features related to tissue attachment are avoided for reconstruction. Skeletal Ba/Ca measurements reflect mean seawater barium [Ba]SW concentrations ([Ba]SW = 51 ± 24 nmol kg−1 (2SD)), in agreement with instrumental data (47 nmol kg−1). We show for the first time that Ba/Ca forms concentric structures in a bamboo coral skeleton section. Our investigations suggest that, while bamboo coral skeletons do record environmental parameters in their mean chemical composition, the magnitude of environmental variability reconstructed from high-resolution chemical maps exceeds that expected from instrumental time series. This necessitates additional investigation of the factors driving bamboo coral skeletal composition.
    Repository Name: EPIC Alfred Wegener Institut
    Type: Article , NonPeerReviewed
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  • 3
    Publication Date: 2017-09-22
    Description: © The Author(s), 2017. This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License. The definitive version was published in Earth-Science Reviews 169 (2017): 132–145, doi:10.1016/j.earscirev.2017.04.005.
    Description: The impact of anthropogenic ocean acidification (OA) on marine ecosystems is a vital concern facing marine scientists and managers of ocean resources. Euthecosomatous pteropods (holoplanktonic gastropods) represent an excellent sentinel for indicating exposure to anthropogenic OA because of the sensitivity of their aragonite shells to the OA conditions less favorable for calcification. However, an integration of observations, experiments and modelling efforts is needed to make accurate predictions of how these organisms will respond to future changes to their environment. Our understanding of the underlying organismal biology and life history is far from complete and must be improved if we are to comprehend fully the responses of these organisms to the multitude of stressors in their environment beyond OA. This review considers the present state of research and understanding of euthecosomatous pteropod biology and ecology of these organisms and considers promising new laboratory methods, advances in instrumentation (such as molecular, trace elements, stable isotopes, palaeobiology alongside autonomous sampling platforms, CT scanning and high-quality video recording) and novel field-based approaches (i.e. studies of upwelling and CO2 vent regions) that may allow us to improve our predictive capacity of their vulnerability and/or resilience. In addition to playing a critical ecological and biogeochemical role, pteropods can offer a significant value as an early-indicator of anthropogenic OA. This role as a sentinel species should be developed further to consolidate their potential use within marine environmental management policy making.
    Description: M.I. Berning is financed by the German Research Foundation Priority Programme 1158 Antarctic Research with Comparable Investigations in Arctic Sea Ice Areas (Project DFG-1158 SCHR 667/15-1).
    Keywords: Euthecosomatous pteropods ; Ocean acidification ; Calcifying organisms ; Marine ecosystem ; Carbonate chemistry
    Repository Name: Woods Hole Open Access Server
    Type: Article
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