ALBERT

All Library Books, journals and Electronic Records Telegrafenberg

feed icon rss

Your email was sent successfully. Check your inbox.

An error occurred while sending the email. Please try again.

Proceed reservation?

Export
  • 1
    facet.materialart.
    Unknown
    Toronto, Ontario: The Bichler and Nitzan Archives
    Publication Date: 2017-05-18
    Description: This is the latest in a series of articles we have been writing on the current crisis. The purpose of our previous papers was to characterize the crisis. We claimed that it was a 'systemic crisis', and that capitalists were gripped by 'systemic fear'. In this article, we seek to explain why. The problem that capitalists face today, we argue, is not that their power has withered, but, on the contrary, that their power has increased. Indeed, not only has their power increased, it has increased by so much that it might be approaching its asymptote. And since capitalists look not backward to the past but forward to the future, they have good reason to fear that, from now on, the most likely trajectory of this power will be not up, but down. The paper begins by setting up our general framework and key concepts. It continues with a step-by-step deconstruction of key power processes in the United States, attempting to assess how close these processes are to their asymptotes. And it concludes with brief observations about what may lie ahead.
    Keywords: ddc:330 ; capitalization ; distribution ; power ; systemic crisis ; United States
    Repository Name: EconStor: OA server of the German National Library of Economics - Leibniz Information Centre for Economics
    Language: English
    Type: doc-type:article
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 2
    facet.materialart.
    Unknown
    Toronto, Ontario: The Bichler and Nitzan Archives
    Publication Date: 2017-05-18
    Description: Do capitalists really want a recovery? Can they afford it? On the face of it, the question sounds silly: of course capitalists want a recovery; how else can they prosper? According to the textbooks, both mainstream and heterodox, capital accumulation and economic growth are two sides of the same process. Accumulation generates growth and growth fuels accumulation, so it seems bootless to ask whether capitalists want growth. Growth is their lifeline, and the more of it, the better it is. Or is it? In the United States, rising unemployment – which hammers the well-being of workers, unincorporated businesses and the unemployed – serves not to undermine but to boost the overall income share of capitalists. And as employment growth decelerates, the income share of the Top 1% – which includes the capitalists as well as their protective power belt – soars. Under these circumstances, what reason do capitalists have to ‘get the economy going’? Why worry about rising unemployment and zero job growth when these very processes serve to boost their income-share-read-power?
    Keywords: ddc:330 ; crisis ; DA ; economic policy ; economic theory ; growth ; income distribution ; Marxism ; monetarism ; neoclassical economics ; power ; profit ; underconsumption ; United States
    Repository Name: EconStor: OA server of the German National Library of Economics - Leibniz Information Centre for Economics
    Language: English
    Type: doc-type:article
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 3
    facet.materialart.
    Unknown
    Toronto, Ontario: The Bichler and Nitzan Archives
    Publication Date: 2017-05-18
    Description: The present essay is the second in a series of four papers in which examine the political economy of armaments in recent decades. In this paper we focus on the ‘armament core’ of large military producers which recently emerged as a powerful bloc within the big economy of the United States. The rise of this core was heightened by a gradual shift of large civilian companies toward the armament business. We argue that the decline of large U.S.-based corporations in civilian world markets since the late 1960s was both a stimulus to and a partial consequence of the increasing involvement with better investment opportunities in government-related activity, especially military production. The increasing significance of international developments inhibits the earlier effectiveness of the U.S. government in assisting corporations based in the United States with its own military spending.
    Keywords: ddc:330 ; armament ; civilian business ; military bias ; military contractors ; profit ; subsidies ; United States
    Repository Name: EconStor: OA server of the German National Library of Economics - Leibniz Information Centre for Economics
    Language: English
    Type: doc-type:workingPaper
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 4
    facet.materialart.
    Unknown
    Toronto, Ontario: The Bichler and Nitzan Archives
    Publication Date: 2017-05-18
    Description: The relationship between sabotage and redistribution is inherently nonlinear. This research note illustrates aspects of this nolinearity in the case of the United States.
    Keywords: ddc:330 ; sabotage ; redistribution ; United States
    Repository Name: EconStor: OA server of the German National Library of Economics - Leibniz Information Centre for Economics
    Language: English
    Type: doc-type:workingPaper
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 5
    facet.materialart.
    Unknown
    Toronto, Ontario: The Bichler & Nitzan Archives
    Publication Date: 2017-05-20
    Description: This essay deals with the relationship between stagflation and the process of restructuring. The literature dealing with the interaction of stagnation and inflation is invariably based on some explicit or implicit assumptions about economic structure, but there are very few writings which concentrate specifically on the link between the macroeconomic phenomenon of stagflation and the process of structural change. Of the few who dealt with this issue, we have chosen to focus mainly on two important contributors – Mancur Olson and Thorstein Veblen. The first based his theory on neoclassical principles, attempting to demonstrate their universality across time and place. The second was influenced by the historical school and concentrated specifically on the institutional features of modern capitalism. Despite the fundamental differences in their respective frameworks, both writers arrive at a similar conclusion, namely, that the phenomenon of stagflation is inherent in the dynamic evolution of collective economic action, particularly in the rise and consolidation of 'distributional coalitions.'
    Keywords: ddc:330 ; absentee ownership ; intangible assets ; big business ; bonds ; capital accumulation ; capitalism ; collective action ; collusion ; corporation ; credit ; degree of monopoly ; distributional coalitions ; excess capacity ; finance ; immaterial wealth ; income distribution ; industry ; inflation ; institutions ; interest ; labour liabilities ; machine process ; material wealth ; neoclassical economics ; normal rate of return ; power ; price ; profit ; productivity ; property ; sabotage ; scarcity ; stagnation ; stagflation ; stocks ; tangible assets ; technology ; United States ; value
    Repository Name: EconStor: OA server of the German National Library of Economics - Leibniz Information Centre for Economics
    Language: English
    Type: doc-type:conferenceObject
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 6
    facet.materialart.
    Unknown
    Toronto, Ontario: The Bichler and Nitzan Archives
    Publication Date: 2017-05-18
    Description: Do capitalists really want a recovery? Can they afford it? On the face of it, the question sounds silly: of course capitalists want a recovery; how else can they prosper? According to the textbooks, both mainstream and heterodox, capital accumulation and economic growth are two sides of the same process. Accumulation generates growth and growth fuels accumulation, so it seems bootless to ask whether capitalists want growth. Growth is their lifeline, and the more of it, the better it is. Or is it? In the United States, rising unemployment – which hammers the well-being of workers, unincorporated businesses and the unemployed – serves not to undermine but to boost the overall income share of capitalists. And as employment growth decelerates, the income share of the Top 1% – which includes the capitalists as well as their protective power belt – soars. Under these circumstances, what reason do capitalists have to ‘get the economy going’? Why worry about rising unemployment and zero job growth when these very processes serve to boost their income-share-read-power?
    Keywords: ddc:330 ; capital ; crisis ; DA ; economic ; policy ; economic ; theory ; growth ; income ; distribution ; labour ; Marxism ; monetarism ; neoclassical ; economics ; power ; profit ; underconsumption ; United States
    Repository Name: EconStor: OA server of the German National Library of Economics - Leibniz Information Centre for Economics
    Language: English
    Type: doc-type:workingPaper
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 7
    Publication Date: 2017-05-19
    Description: It is popular these days to talk about the "discontent" of neoliberal globalization. This "discontent" is no longer the prerogative of intellectuals. Increasingly, it comes from below, with opposition from the grassroots. But there may be another type of discontent lurking behind the scenes. This other discontent comes from above. It is the discontent of the ruling class. In our opinion, the world may have reached a historical junction in which a significant part of the global ruling class has become discontented with neoliberalism. The purpose of this presentation is threefold: (1) to explain why the world’s dominant capital groups have become discontented with neoliberal globalization; (2) to speculate on what may replace neoliberal globalization; and (3) to link this transition in the nature of accumulation to the new wars.
    Keywords: ddc:330 ; arms ; accumulation ; capital ; capitalism ; conflict ; corporation ; crisis ; distribution ; elite ; energy ; finance ; globalization ; growth ; imperialism ; GPE ; liberalism ; Middle East ; military ; national interest ; neoliberalism ; oil ; OPEC ; ownership ; peace ; power ; profit ; ruling class ; security ; stagflation ; state ; stock market ; technology ; TNC ; United States ; US ; violence ; war
    Repository Name: EconStor: OA server of the German National Library of Economics - Leibniz Information Centre for Economics
    Language: English
    Type: doc-type:bookPart
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 8
    Publication Date: 2017-05-19
    Description: The purpose of this article is to offer an alternative analytical framework for understanding the long term transformation in Israel. First, we argue against the conventional separation between the “political system” and the “economic system.” This separationist approach has been popular among Israeli scholars but its analytical value is open to doubt. Second, instead of the comment aggregate/statist approach, we take the disaggregate route of political economy, accentuating the historical role played by key power groups. And, finally, rather than focus merely on domestic considerations, we claim that both the earlier military economy and the current trajectory into “peace markets” are part of a broader global developments, particularly the internationalization of business institutions and the changing nature of the capitalist nation-state. In our opinion, the sharp “U-turn” in Israeli history is intimately linked to the changing nature of capital accumulation and corporate concentration, both in Israel and in the United States. For the large core firms at the centre of the economy, which we view as principal actors in this process, accumulation and concentration are two sides of the same process. With the evolution of modern capitalism, the leading firms are increasingly driven not to maximize their profits but rather to “beat the average.” Specifically, they seek to achieve a “differential rate of accumulation” – that is, to exceed the average rate of return in the economy. However, since a differential growth in profits implies control over a growing share of the aggregate capitalized assets, for these firms the goal of accumulation means a quest for rising corporate concentration.
    Keywords: ddc:330 ; arms ; accumulation ; acquisitions ; capital ; capitalism ; centralization ; competition ; conflict ; conglomeration ; corporation ; credit ; crisis ; debt ; development ; distribution ; dual economy ; elite ; finance ; globalization ; growth ; imperialism ; distribution ; IPE ; Israel ; labour ; liberalization ; M&A ; merger ; methodology ; Middle East ; military ; national interest ; security ; oil ; OPEC ; ownership ; Palestine ; peace ; politics ; power ; privatization ; profit ; ruling class ; sabotage ; stagflation ; state ; stock market ; technology ; TNC ; United States ; US ; violence ; war ; Zionism
    Repository Name: EconStor: OA server of the German National Library of Economics - Leibniz Information Centre for Economics
    Language: English
    Type: doc-type:bookPart
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 9
    facet.materialart.
    Unknown
    London: Pluto Press
    Publication Date: 2017-05-19
    Description: A theoretical and historical account of the global political economy of oil, armament and capital accumulation in the Middel East.
    Keywords: ddc:330 ; arms ; accumulation ; capital ; capitalism ; centralization ; competition ; conflict ; corporation ; crisis ; development ; distribution ; dual economy ; elite ; energy ; finance ; globalization ; growth ; imperialism ; distribution ; institutionalism ; IPE ; Israel ; Middle East ; military ; national interest ; security ; oil ; OPEC ; ownership ; peace ; politics ; power ; privatization ; profit ; ruling class ; sabotage ; stagflation ; state ; stock market ; technology ; TNC ; United States ; US ; violence ; war ; Zionism
    Repository Name: EconStor: OA server of the German National Library of Economics - Leibniz Information Centre for Economics
    Language: English
    Type: doc-type:bookPart
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 10
    facet.materialart.
    Unknown
    Toronto, Ontario: The Bichler & Nitzan Archives
    Publication Date: 2017-05-20
    Description: The United States is often hailed as the world's largest 'free market'. But this 'free market' is also the world's largest penal colony. It holds over seven million adults – roughly five per cent of the labour force – in jail, in prison, on parole and on probation. Is this an anomaly, or does the 'free market' require massive state punishment? Why did the correctional population start to rise in the 1980s, together with the onset of neoliberalism? How is this increase related to the upward redistribution of income and the capitalization of power? Can soaring incarceration sustain the unprecedented power of dominant capital, or is there a reversal in the offing?
    Keywords: ddc:330 ; capital as power ; crime ; Georg Rusche ; punishment ; systemic crisis ; unemployment ; United States
    Repository Name: EconStor: OA server of the German National Library of Economics - Leibniz Information Centre for Economics
    Language: English
    Type: doc-type:conferenceObject
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
Close ⊗
This website uses cookies and the analysis tool Matomo. More information can be found here...