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  • 1
    Publication Date: 2002-06-01
    Description: The high degree of similarity between the mouse and human genomes is demonstrated through analysis of the sequence of mouse chromosome 16 (Mmu 16), which was obtained as part of a whole-genome shotgun assembly of the mouse genome. The mouse genome is about 10% smaller than the human genome, owing to a lower repetitive DNA content. Comparison of the structure and protein-coding potential of Mmu 16 with that of the homologous segments of the human genome identifies regions of conserved synteny with human chromosomes (Hsa) 3, 8, 12, 16, 21, and 22. Gene content and order are highly conserved between Mmu 16 and the syntenic blocks of the human genome. Of the 731 predicted genes on Mmu 16, 509 align with orthologs on the corresponding portions of the human genome, 44 are likely paralogous to these genes, and 164 genes have homologs elsewhere in the human genome; there are 14 genes for which we could find no human counterpart.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Mural, Richard J -- Adams, Mark D -- Myers, Eugene W -- Smith, Hamilton O -- Miklos, George L Gabor -- Wides, Ron -- Halpern, Aaron -- Li, Peter W -- Sutton, Granger G -- Nadeau, Joe -- Salzberg, Steven L -- Holt, Robert A -- Kodira, Chinnappa D -- Lu, Fu -- Chen, Lin -- Deng, Zuoming -- Evangelista, Carlos C -- Gan, Weiniu -- Heiman, Thomas J -- Li, Jiayin -- Li, Zhenya -- Merkulov, Gennady V -- Milshina, Natalia V -- Naik, Ashwinikumar K -- Qi, Rong -- Shue, Bixiong Chris -- Wang, Aihui -- Wang, Jian -- Wang, Xin -- Yan, Xianghe -- Ye, Jane -- Yooseph, Shibu -- Zhao, Qi -- Zheng, Liansheng -- Zhu, Shiaoping C -- Biddick, Kendra -- Bolanos, Randall -- Delcher, Arthur L -- Dew, Ian M -- Fasulo, Daniel -- Flanigan, Michael J -- Huson, Daniel H -- Kravitz, Saul A -- Miller, Jason R -- Mobarry, Clark M -- Reinert, Knut -- Remington, Karin A -- Zhang, Qing -- Zheng, Xiangqun H -- Nusskern, Deborah R -- Lai, Zhongwu -- Lei, Yiding -- Zhong, Wenyan -- Yao, Alison -- Guan, Ping -- Ji, Rui-Ru -- Gu, Zhiping -- Wang, Zhen-Yuan -- Zhong, Fei -- Xiao, Chunlin -- Chiang, Chia-Chien -- Yandell, Mark -- Wortman, Jennifer R -- Amanatides, Peter G -- Hladun, Suzanne L -- Pratts, Eric C -- Johnson, Jeffery E -- Dodson, Kristina L -- Woodford, Kerry J -- Evans, Cheryl A -- Gropman, Barry -- Rusch, Douglas B -- Venter, Eli -- Wang, Mei -- Smith, Thomas J -- Houck, Jarrett T -- Tompkins, Donald E -- Haynes, Charles -- Jacob, Debbie -- Chin, Soo H -- Allen, David R -- Dahlke, Carl E -- Sanders, Robert -- Li, Kelvin -- Liu, Xiangjun -- Levitsky, Alexander A -- Majoros, William H -- Chen, Quan -- Xia, Ashley C -- Lopez, John R -- Donnelly, Michael T -- Newman, Matthew H -- Glodek, Anna -- Kraft, Cheryl L -- Nodell, Marc -- Ali, Feroze -- An, Hui-Jin -- Baldwin-Pitts, Danita -- Beeson, Karen Y -- Cai, Shuang -- Carnes, Mark -- Carver, Amy -- Caulk, Parris M -- Center, Angela -- Chen, Yen-Hui -- Cheng, Ming-Lai -- Coyne, My D -- Crowder, Michelle -- Danaher, Steven -- Davenport, Lionel B -- Desilets, Raymond -- Dietz, Susanne M -- Doup, Lisa -- Dullaghan, Patrick -- Ferriera, Steven -- Fosler, Carl R -- Gire, Harold C -- Gluecksmann, Andres -- Gocayne, Jeannine D -- Gray, Jonathan -- Hart, Brit -- Haynes, Jason -- Hoover, Jeffery -- Howland, Tim -- Ibegwam, Chinyere -- Jalali, Mena -- Johns, David -- Kline, Leslie -- Ma, Daniel S -- MacCawley, Steven -- Magoon, Anand -- Mann, Felecia -- May, David -- McIntosh, Tina C -- Mehta, Somil -- Moy, Linda -- Moy, Mee C -- Murphy, Brian J -- Murphy, Sean D -- Nelson, Keith A -- Nuri, Zubeda -- Parker, Kimberly A -- Prudhomme, Alexandre C -- Puri, Vinita N -- Qureshi, Hina -- Raley, John C -- Reardon, Matthew S -- Regier, Megan A -- Rogers, Yu-Hui C -- Romblad, Deanna L -- Schutz, Jakob -- Scott, John L -- Scott, Richard -- Sitter, Cynthia D -- Smallwood, Michella -- Sprague, Arlan C -- Stewart, Erin -- Strong, Renee V -- Suh, Ellen -- Sylvester, Karena -- Thomas, Reginald -- Tint, Ni Ni -- Tsonis, Christopher -- Wang, Gary -- Wang, George -- Williams, Monica S -- Williams, Sherita M -- Windsor, Sandra M -- Wolfe, Keriellen -- Wu, Mitchell M -- Zaveri, Jayshree -- Chaturvedi, Kabir -- Gabrielian, Andrei E -- Ke, Zhaoxi -- Sun, Jingtao -- Subramanian, Gangadharan -- Venter, J Craig -- Pfannkoch, Cynthia M -- Barnstead, Mary -- Stephenson, Lisa D -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2002 May 31;296(5573):1661-71.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Celera Genomics, 45 West Gude Drive, Rockville, MD 20850, USA. richard.mural@celera.com〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12040188" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Base Composition ; Chromosomes/*genetics ; Chromosomes, Human/genetics ; Computational Biology ; Conserved Sequence ; Databases, Nucleic Acid ; Evolution, Molecular ; Genes ; Genetic Markers ; *Genome ; *Genome, Human ; Genomics ; Humans ; Mice ; Mice, Inbred A/genetics ; Mice, Inbred DBA/genetics ; Mice, Inbred Strains/*genetics ; Molecular Sequence Data ; Physical Chromosome Mapping ; Proteins/chemistry/genetics ; Sequence Alignment ; *Sequence Analysis, DNA ; Species Specificity ; *Synteny
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 2
    Publication Date: 2008-10-10
    Description: Plasmodium knowlesi is an intracellular malaria parasite whose natural vertebrate host is Macaca fascicularis (the 'kra' monkey); however, it is now increasingly recognized as a significant cause of human malaria, particularly in southeast Asia. Plasmodium knowlesi was the first malaria parasite species in which antigenic variation was demonstrated, and it has a close phylogenetic relationship to Plasmodium vivax, the second most important species of human malaria parasite (reviewed in ref. 4). Despite their relatedness, there are important phenotypic differences between them, such as host blood cell preference, absence of a dormant liver stage or 'hypnozoite' in P. knowlesi, and length of the asexual cycle (reviewed in ref. 4). Here we present an analysis of the P. knowlesi (H strain, Pk1(A+) clone) nuclear genome sequence. This is the first monkey malaria parasite genome to be described, and it provides an opportunity for comparison with the recently completed P. vivax genome and other sequenced Plasmodium genomes. In contrast to other Plasmodium genomes, putative variant antigen families are dispersed throughout the genome and are associated with intrachromosomal telomere repeats. One of these families, the KIRs, contains sequences that collectively match over one-half of the host CD99 extracellular domain, which may represent an unusual form of molecular mimicry.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2656934/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2656934/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Pain, A -- Bohme, U -- Berry, A E -- Mungall, K -- Finn, R D -- Jackson, A P -- Mourier, T -- Mistry, J -- Pasini, E M -- Aslett, M A -- Balasubrammaniam, S -- Borgwardt, K -- Brooks, K -- Carret, C -- Carver, T J -- Cherevach, I -- Chillingworth, T -- Clark, T G -- Galinski, M R -- Hall, N -- Harper, D -- Harris, D -- Hauser, H -- Ivens, A -- Janssen, C S -- Keane, T -- Larke, N -- Lapp, S -- Marti, M -- Moule, S -- Meyer, I M -- Ormond, D -- Peters, N -- Sanders, M -- Sanders, S -- Sargeant, T J -- Simmonds, M -- Smith, F -- Squares, R -- Thurston, S -- Tivey, A R -- Walker, D -- White, B -- Zuiderwijk, E -- Churcher, C -- Quail, M A -- Cowman, A F -- Turner, C M R -- Rajandream, M A -- Kocken, C H M -- Thomas, A W -- Newbold, C I -- Barrell, B G -- Berriman, M -- 085775/Wellcome Trust/United Kingdom -- Wellcome Trust/United Kingdom -- England -- Nature. 2008 Oct 9;455(7214):799-803. doi: 10.1038/nature07306.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, Genome Campus, Hinxton, Cambridgeshire CB10 1SA, UK. ap2@sanger.ac.uk〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18843368" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Amino Acid Sequence ; Animals ; Antigens, CD/chemistry/genetics ; Chromosomes/genetics ; Conserved Sequence ; Genes, Protozoan/genetics ; Genome, Protozoan/*genetics ; *Genomics ; Humans ; Macaca mulatta/*parasitology ; Malaria/*parasitology ; Molecular Sequence Data ; Plasmodium knowlesi/classification/*genetics/physiology ; Protein Structure, Tertiary ; Protozoan Proteins/chemistry/genetics ; Sequence Analysis, DNA ; Telomere/genetics
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 3
    Publication Date: 2011-10-14
    Description: The naked mole rat (Heterocephalus glaber) is a strictly subterranean, extraordinarily long-lived eusocial mammal. Although it is the size of a mouse, its maximum lifespan exceeds 30 years, making this animal the longest-living rodent. Naked mole rats show negligible senescence, no age-related increase in mortality, and high fecundity until death. In addition to delayed ageing, they are resistant to both spontaneous cancer and experimentally induced tumorigenesis. Naked mole rats pose a challenge to the theories that link ageing, cancer and redox homeostasis. Although characterized by significant oxidative stress, the naked mole rat proteome does not show age-related susceptibility to oxidative damage or increased ubiquitination. Naked mole rats naturally reside in large colonies with a single breeding female, the 'queen', who suppresses the sexual maturity of her subordinates. They also live in full darkness, at low oxygen and high carbon dioxide concentrations, and are unable to sustain thermogenesis nor feel certain types of pain. Here we report the sequencing and analysis of the naked mole rat genome, which reveals unique genome features and molecular adaptations consistent with cancer resistance, poikilothermy, hairlessness and insensitivity to low oxygen, and altered visual function, circadian rythms and taste sensing. This information provides insights into the naked mole rat's exceptional longevity and ability to live in hostile conditions, in the dark and at low oxygen. The extreme traits of the naked mole rat, together with the reported genome and transcriptome information, offer opportunities for understanding ageing and advancing other areas of biological and biomedical research.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3319411/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3319411/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Kim, Eun Bae -- Fang, Xiaodong -- Fushan, Alexey A -- Huang, Zhiyong -- Lobanov, Alexei V -- Han, Lijuan -- Marino, Stefano M -- Sun, Xiaoqing -- Turanov, Anton A -- Yang, Pengcheng -- Yim, Sun Hee -- Zhao, Xiang -- Kasaikina, Marina V -- Stoletzki, Nina -- Peng, Chunfang -- Polak, Paz -- Xiong, Zhiqiang -- Kiezun, Adam -- Zhu, Yabing -- Chen, Yuanxin -- Kryukov, Gregory V -- Zhang, Qiang -- Peshkin, Leonid -- Yang, Lan -- Bronson, Roderick T -- Buffenstein, Rochelle -- Wang, Bo -- Han, Changlei -- Li, Qiye -- Chen, Li -- Zhao, Wei -- Sunyaev, Shamil R -- Park, Thomas J -- Zhang, Guojie -- Wang, Jun -- Gladyshev, Vadim N -- AG021518/AG/NIA NIH HHS/ -- AG038004/AG/NIA NIH HHS/ -- CA080946/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01 AG021518/AG/NIA NIH HHS/ -- R01 AG021518-10/AG/NIA NIH HHS/ -- R01 AG038004/AG/NIA NIH HHS/ -- R01 AG038004-02/AG/NIA NIH HHS/ -- R01 CA080946/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01 CA080946-11/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- England -- Nature. 2011 Oct 12;479(7372):223-7. doi: 10.1038/nature10533.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Bioinspired Science, Ewha Womans University, Seoul, 120-750, Korea.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21993625" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Adaptation, Physiological/*genetics ; Aging/genetics ; Amino Acid Sequence ; Animals ; Body Temperature Regulation/genetics ; Carbon Dioxide/analysis/metabolism ; Circadian Rhythm/genetics ; Darkness ; Genes/genetics ; Genome/*genetics ; Genomic Instability/genetics ; Genomics ; Humans ; Ion Channels/genetics ; Longevity/*genetics/physiology ; Male ; Mitochondrial Proteins/genetics ; Mole Rats/*genetics/*physiology ; Molecular Sequence Data ; Mutagenesis/genetics ; Oxygen/analysis/metabolism ; Taste/genetics ; Transcriptome/genetics ; Visual Perception/genetics
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 4
    Publication Date: 2012-01-13
    Description: Early T-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ETP ALL) is an aggressive malignancy of unknown genetic basis. We performed whole-genome sequencing of 12 ETP ALL cases and assessed the frequency of the identified somatic mutations in 94 T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia cases. ETP ALL was characterized by activating mutations in genes regulating cytokine receptor and RAS signalling (67% of cases; NRAS, KRAS, FLT3, IL7R, JAK3, JAK1, SH2B3 and BRAF), inactivating lesions disrupting haematopoietic development (58%; GATA3, ETV6, RUNX1, IKZF1 and EP300) and histone-modifying genes (48%; EZH2, EED, SUZ12, SETD2 and EP300). We also identified new targets of recurrent mutation including DNM2, ECT2L and RELN. The mutational spectrum is similar to myeloid tumours, and moreover, the global transcriptional profile of ETP ALL was similar to that of normal and myeloid leukaemia haematopoietic stem cells. These findings suggest that addition of myeloid-directed therapies might improve the poor outcome of ETP ALL.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3267575/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3267575/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Zhang, Jinghui -- Ding, Li -- Holmfeldt, Linda -- Wu, Gang -- Heatley, Sue L -- Payne-Turner, Debbie -- Easton, John -- Chen, Xiang -- Wang, Jianmin -- Rusch, Michael -- Lu, Charles -- Chen, Shann-Ching -- Wei, Lei -- Collins-Underwood, J Racquel -- Ma, Jing -- Roberts, Kathryn G -- Pounds, Stanley B -- Ulyanov, Anatoly -- Becksfort, Jared -- Gupta, Pankaj -- Huether, Robert -- Kriwacki, Richard W -- Parker, Matthew -- McGoldrick, Daniel J -- Zhao, David -- Alford, Daniel -- Espy, Stephen -- Bobba, Kiran Chand -- Song, Guangchun -- Pei, Deqing -- Cheng, Cheng -- Roberts, Stefan -- Barbato, Michael I -- Campana, Dario -- Coustan-Smith, Elaine -- Shurtleff, Sheila A -- Raimondi, Susana C -- Kleppe, Maria -- Cools, Jan -- Shimano, Kristin A -- Hermiston, Michelle L -- Doulatov, Sergei -- Eppert, Kolja -- Laurenti, Elisa -- Notta, Faiyaz -- Dick, John E -- Basso, Giuseppe -- Hunger, Stephen P -- Loh, Mignon L -- Devidas, Meenakshi -- Wood, Brent -- Winter, Stuart -- Dunsmore, Kimberley P -- Fulton, Robert S -- Fulton, Lucinda L -- Hong, Xin -- Harris, Christopher C -- Dooling, David J -- Ochoa, Kerri -- Johnson, Kimberly J -- Obenauer, John C -- Evans, William E -- Pui, Ching-Hon -- Naeve, Clayton W -- Ley, Timothy J -- Mardis, Elaine R -- Wilson, Richard K -- Downing, James R -- Mullighan, Charles G -- CA114766/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- CA98413/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- CA98543/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- P30 CA021765/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- P30 CA021765-33/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- P30CA021765/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- U01GM92666/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- U54 HG003079/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- England -- Nature. 2012 Jan 11;481(7380):157-63. doi: 10.1038/nature10725.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Computational Biology and Bioinformatics, St Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee 38105, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22237106" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Age of Onset ; Child ; DNA Copy Number Variations/genetics ; Genes, ras/genetics ; Genetic Predisposition to Disease/*genetics ; Genome, Human/genetics ; Genomics ; Hematopoiesis/genetics ; Histones/metabolism ; Humans ; Janus Kinases/genetics/metabolism ; Leukemia, Myeloid, Acute/drug therapy/genetics/pathology ; Molecular Sequence Data ; Mutation/*genetics ; Precursor T-Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma/drug therapy/*genetics/pathology ; Receptors, Interleukin-7/genetics ; Sequence Analysis, DNA ; Signal Transduction/genetics ; Stem Cells/metabolism/pathology ; T-Lymphocytes/metabolism/pathology ; Translocation, Genetic/genetics
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 5
    Publication Date: 2014-09-12
    Description: Gibbons are small arboreal apes that display an accelerated rate of evolutionary chromosomal rearrangement and occupy a key node in the primate phylogeny between Old World monkeys and great apes. Here we present the assembly and analysis of a northern white-cheeked gibbon (Nomascus leucogenys) genome. We describe the propensity for a gibbon-specific retrotransposon (LAVA) to insert into chromosome segregation genes and alter transcription by providing a premature termination site, suggesting a possible molecular mechanism for the genome plasticity of the gibbon lineage. We further show that the gibbon genera (Nomascus, Hylobates, Hoolock and Symphalangus) experienced a near-instantaneous radiation approximately 5 million years ago, coincident with major geographical changes in southeast Asia that caused cycles of habitat compression and expansion. Finally, we identify signatures of positive selection in genes important for forelimb development (TBX5) and connective tissues (COL1A1) that may have been involved in the adaptation of gibbons to their arboreal habitat.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4249732/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4249732/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Carbone, Lucia -- Harris, R Alan -- Gnerre, Sante -- Veeramah, Krishna R -- Lorente-Galdos, Belen -- Huddleston, John -- Meyer, Thomas J -- Herrero, Javier -- Roos, Christian -- Aken, Bronwen -- Anaclerio, Fabio -- Archidiacono, Nicoletta -- Baker, Carl -- Barrell, Daniel -- Batzer, Mark A -- Beal, Kathryn -- Blancher, Antoine -- Bohrson, Craig L -- Brameier, Markus -- Campbell, Michael S -- Capozzi, Oronzo -- Casola, Claudio -- Chiatante, Giorgia -- Cree, Andrew -- Damert, Annette -- de Jong, Pieter J -- Dumas, Laura -- Fernandez-Callejo, Marcos -- Flicek, Paul -- Fuchs, Nina V -- Gut, Ivo -- Gut, Marta -- Hahn, Matthew W -- Hernandez-Rodriguez, Jessica -- Hillier, LaDeana W -- Hubley, Robert -- Ianc, Bianca -- Izsvak, Zsuzsanna -- Jablonski, Nina G -- Johnstone, Laurel M -- Karimpour-Fard, Anis -- Konkel, Miriam K -- Kostka, Dennis -- Lazar, Nathan H -- Lee, Sandra L -- Lewis, Lora R -- Liu, Yue -- Locke, Devin P -- Mallick, Swapan -- Mendez, Fernando L -- Muffato, Matthieu -- Nazareth, Lynne V -- Nevonen, Kimberly A -- O'Bleness, Majesta -- Ochis, Cornelia -- Odom, Duncan T -- Pollard, Katherine S -- Quilez, Javier -- Reich, David -- Rocchi, Mariano -- Schumann, Gerald G -- Searle, Stephen -- Sikela, James M -- Skollar, Gabriella -- Smit, Arian -- Sonmez, Kemal -- ten Hallers, Boudewijn -- Terhune, Elizabeth -- Thomas, Gregg W C -- Ullmer, Brygg -- Ventura, Mario -- Walker, Jerilyn A -- Wall, Jeffrey D -- Walter, Lutz -- Ward, Michelle C -- Wheelan, Sarah J -- Whelan, Christopher W -- White, Simon -- Wilhelm, Larry J -- Woerner, August E -- Yandell, Mark -- Zhu, Baoli -- Hammer, Michael F -- Marques-Bonet, Tomas -- Eichler, Evan E -- Fulton, Lucinda -- Fronick, Catrina -- Muzny, Donna M -- Warren, Wesley C -- Worley, Kim C -- Rogers, Jeffrey -- Wilson, Richard K -- Gibbs, Richard A -- 095908/Wellcome Trust/United Kingdom -- 15603/Cancer Research UK/United Kingdom -- 260372/European Research Council/International -- HG002385/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- P30 AA019355/AA/NIAAA NIH HHS/ -- P30CA006973/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- P51 RR000163/RR/NCRR NIH HHS/ -- R01 GM059290/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- R01 GM59290/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- R01 HG002385/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- R01 HG002939/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- R01 HG005226/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- R01 MH081203/MH/NIMH NIH HHS/ -- R01_HG005226/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- T15 LM007088/LM/NLM NIH HHS/ -- U41 HG007497/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- U41 HG007497-01/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- U41HG007234/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- U54 HG003079/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- U54 HG003273/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- U54HG003273/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- WT095908/Wellcome Trust/United Kingdom -- WT098051/Wellcome Trust/United Kingdom -- Howard Hughes Medical Institute/ -- England -- Nature. 2014 Sep 11;513(7517):195-201. doi: 10.1038/nature13679.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉1] Oregon Health &Science University, Department of Behavioral Neuroscience, 3181 SW Sam Jackson Park Road Portland, Oregon 97239, USA. [2] Oregon National Primate Research Center, Division of Neuroscience, 505 NW 185th Avenue, Beaverton, Oregon 97006, USA. [3] Oregon Health &Science University, Department of Molecular &Medical Genetics, 3181 SW Sam Jackson Park Road, Portland, Oregon 97239, USA. [4] Oregon Health &Science University, Bioinformatics and Computational Biology Division, Department of Medical Informatics &Clinical Epidemiology, 3181 SW Sam Jackson Park Road, Portland, Oregon 97239, USA. ; Baylor College of Medicine, Department of Molecular and Human Genetics, One Baylor Plaza, Houston, Texas 77030, USA. ; Nabsys, 60 Clifford Street, Providence, Rhode Island 02903, USA. ; 1] University of Arizona, ARL Division of Biotechnology, Tucson, Arizona 85721, USA. [2] Stony Brook University, Department of Ecology and Evolution, Stony Brook, New York 11790, USA. ; IBE, Institut de Biologia Evolutiva (UPF-CSIC), Universitat Pompeu Fabra, PRBB, Doctor Aiguader, 88, 08003 Barcelona, Spain. ; 1] Department of Genome Sciences, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, Washington 98195, USA. [2] Howard Hughes Medical Institute, 1705 NE Pacific Street, Seattle, Washington 98195, USA. ; Oregon Health &Science University, Department of Behavioral Neuroscience, 3181 SW Sam Jackson Park Road Portland, Oregon 97239, USA. ; 1] European Molecular Biology Laboratory, European Bioinformatics Institute, Wellcome Trust Genome Campus, Hinxton, Cambridge CB10 1SD, UK. [2] The Genome Analysis Centre, Norwich Research Park, Norwich NR4 7UH, UK. [3] Bill Lyons Informatics Center, UCL Cancer Institute, University College London, London WC1E 6DD, UK (J.He); Seven Bridges Genomics, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138, USA (D.P.L.); Department of Genetics, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305, USA (F.L.M.); BioNano Genomics, San Diego, California 92121, USA (B.t.H.); University of Chicago, Department of Human Genetics, Chicago, Illinois 60637, USA (M.C.W.); Stanley Center for Psychiatric Research, Broad Institute, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138, USA (C.W.W.); The CAS Key Laboratory of Pathogenic Microbiology and Immunology, Institute of Microbiology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101, China (B.Z.). ; Leibniz Institute for Primate Research, Gene Bank of Primates, German Primate Center, Gottingen 37077, Germany. ; 1] European Molecular Biology Laboratory, European Bioinformatics Institute, Wellcome Trust Genome Campus, Hinxton, Cambridge CB10 1SD, UK. [2] European Bioinformatics Institute, Wellcome Trust Genome Campus, Hinxton, Cambridge CB10 1SD, UK. ; University of Bari, Department of Biology, Via Orabona 4, 70125, Bari, Italy. ; Department of Genome Sciences, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, Washington 98195, USA. ; Louisiana State University, Department of Biological Sciences, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70803, USA. ; European Molecular Biology Laboratory, European Bioinformatics Institute, Wellcome Trust Genome Campus, Hinxton, Cambridge CB10 1SD, UK. ; University of Paul Sabatier, Toulouse 31062, France. ; The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Division of Biostatistics and Bioinformatics, Baltimore, Maryland 21205, USA. ; University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah 84112, USA. ; Texas A&M University, Department of Ecosystem Science and Management, College Station, Texas 77843, USA. ; Human Genome Sequencing Center, Department of Molecular and Human Genetics, Baylor College of Medicine, One Baylor Plaza, Houston, Texas 77030, USA. ; Babes-Bolyai-University, Institute for Interdisciplinary Research in Bio-Nano-Sciences, Molecular Biology Center, Cluj-Napoca 400084, Romania. ; Children's Hospital Oakland Research Institute, BACPAC Resources, Oakland, California 94609, USA. ; University of Colorado School of Medicine, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Genetics, Aurora, Colorado 80045, USA. ; Max Delbruck Center for Molecular Medicine, Berlin 13125, Germany. ; Centro Nacional de Analisis Genomico (CNAG), Parc Cientific de Barcelona, Barcelona 08028, Spain. ; Indiana University, School of Informatics and Computing, Bloomington, Indiana 47408, USA. ; The Genome Center at Washington University, Washington University School of Medicine, 4444 Forest Park Avenue, Saint Louis, Missouri 63108, USA. ; Institute for Systems Biology, Seattle, Washington 98109-5234, USA. ; The Pennsylvania State University, Department of Anthropology, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802, USA. ; University of Arizona, ARL Division of Biotechnology, Tucson, Arizona 85721, USA. ; University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Department of Developmental Biology, Department of Computational and Systems Biology, Pittsburg, Pennsylvania 15261, USA. ; Oregon Health &Science University, Bioinformatics and Computational Biology Division, Department of Medical Informatics &Clinical Epidemiology, 3181 SW Sam Jackson Park Road, Portland, Oregon 97239, USA. ; 1] The Genome Center at Washington University, Washington University School of Medicine, 4444 Forest Park Avenue, Saint Louis, Missouri 63108, USA. [2] Bill Lyons Informatics Center, UCL Cancer Institute, University College London, London WC1E 6DD, UK (J.He); Seven Bridges Genomics, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138, USA (D.P.L.); Department of Genetics, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305, USA (F.L.M.); BioNano Genomics, San Diego, California 92121, USA (B.t.H.); University of Chicago, Department of Human Genetics, Chicago, Illinois 60637, USA (M.C.W.); Stanley Center for Psychiatric Research, Broad Institute, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138, USA (C.W.W.); The CAS Key Laboratory of Pathogenic Microbiology and Immunology, Institute of Microbiology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101, China (B.Z.). ; Harvard Medical School, Department of Genetics, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA. ; 1] University of Arizona, ARL Division of Biotechnology, Tucson, Arizona 85721, USA. [2] Bill Lyons Informatics Center, UCL Cancer Institute, University College London, London WC1E 6DD, UK (J.He); Seven Bridges Genomics, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138, USA (D.P.L.); Department of Genetics, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305, USA (F.L.M.); BioNano Genomics, San Diego, California 92121, USA (B.t.H.); University of Chicago, Department of Human Genetics, Chicago, Illinois 60637, USA (M.C.W.); Stanley Center for Psychiatric Research, Broad Institute, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138, USA (C.W.W.); The CAS Key Laboratory of Pathogenic Microbiology and Immunology, Institute of Microbiology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101, China (B.Z.). ; Oregon National Primate Research Center, Division of Neuroscience, 505 NW 185th Avenue, Beaverton, Oregon 97006, USA. ; 1] European Bioinformatics Institute, Wellcome Trust Genome Campus, Hinxton, Cambridge CB10 1SD, UK. [2] University of Cambridge, Cancer Research UK-Cambridge Institute, Cambridge CB2 0RE, UK. ; 1] University of California, Gladstone Institutes, San Francisco, California 94158-226, USA. [2] Institute for Human Genetics, University of California, San Francisco, California 94143-0794, USA. [3] Division of Biostatistics, University of California, San Francisco, California 94143-0794, USA. ; Paul Ehrlich Institute, Division of Medical Biotechnology, 63225 Langen, Germany. ; European Bioinformatics Institute, Wellcome Trust Genome Campus, Hinxton, Cambridge CB10 1SD, UK. ; Gibbon Conservation Center, 19100 Esguerra Rd, Santa Clarita, California 91350, USA. ; 1] Oregon Health &Science University, Bioinformatics and Computational Biology Division, Department of Medical Informatics &Clinical Epidemiology, 3181 SW Sam Jackson Park Road, Portland, Oregon 97239, USA. [2] Oregon Health &Science University, Center for Spoken Language Understanding, Institute on Development and Disability, Portland, Oregon 97239, USA. ; 1] Children's Hospital Oakland Research Institute, BACPAC Resources, Oakland, California 94609, USA. [2] Bill Lyons Informatics Center, UCL Cancer Institute, University College London, London WC1E 6DD, UK (J.He); Seven Bridges Genomics, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138, USA (D.P.L.); Department of Genetics, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305, USA (F.L.M.); BioNano Genomics, San Diego, California 92121, USA (B.t.H.); University of Chicago, Department of Human Genetics, Chicago, Illinois 60637, USA (M.C.W.); Stanley Center for Psychiatric Research, Broad Institute, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138, USA (C.W.W.); The CAS Key Laboratory of Pathogenic Microbiology and Immunology, Institute of Microbiology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101, China (B.Z.). ; Louisiana State University, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70803, USA. ; 1] Institute for Human Genetics, University of California, San Francisco, California 94143-0794, USA. [2] Division of Biostatistics, University of California, San Francisco, California 94143-0794, USA. ; 1] University of Cambridge, Cancer Research UK-Cambridge Institute, Cambridge CB2 0RE, UK. [2] Bill Lyons Informatics Center, UCL Cancer Institute, University College London, London WC1E 6DD, UK (J.He); Seven Bridges Genomics, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138, USA (D.P.L.); Department of Genetics, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305, USA (F.L.M.); BioNano Genomics, San Diego, California 92121, USA (B.t.H.); University of Chicago, Department of Human Genetics, Chicago, Illinois 60637, USA (M.C.W.); Stanley Center for Psychiatric Research, Broad Institute, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138, USA (C.W.W.); The CAS Key Laboratory of Pathogenic Microbiology and Immunology, Institute of Microbiology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101, China (B.Z.). ; 1] Oregon Health &Science University, Center for Spoken Language Understanding, Institute on Development and Disability, Portland, Oregon 97239, USA. [2] Bill Lyons Informatics Center, UCL Cancer Institute, University College London, London WC1E 6DD, UK (J.He); Seven Bridges Genomics, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138, USA (D.P.L.); Department of Genetics, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305, USA (F.L.M.); BioNano Genomics, San Diego, California 92121, USA (B.t.H.); University of Chicago, Department of Human Genetics, Chicago, Illinois 60637, USA (M.C.W.); Stanley Center for Psychiatric Research, Broad Institute, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138, USA (C.W.W.); The CAS Key Laboratory of Pathogenic Microbiology and Immunology, Institute of Microbiology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101, China (B.Z.). ; 1] IBE, Institut de Biologia Evolutiva (UPF-CSIC), Universitat Pompeu Fabra, PRBB, Doctor Aiguader, 88, 08003 Barcelona, Spain. [2] Centro Nacional de Analisis Genomico (CNAG), Parc Cientific de Barcelona, Barcelona 08028, Spain.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25209798" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Evolution, Molecular ; Genome/*genetics ; Hominidae/classification/genetics ; Humans ; Hylobates/*classification/*genetics ; *Karyotype ; Molecular Sequence Data ; *Phylogeny ; Retroelements/genetics ; Selection, Genetic ; Transcription Termination, Genetic
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  • 6
    Publication Date: 2014-04-25
    Description: The human X and Y chromosomes evolved from an ordinary pair of autosomes, but millions of years ago genetic decay ravaged the Y chromosome, and only three per cent of its ancestral genes survived. We reconstructed the evolution of the Y chromosome across eight mammals to identify biases in gene content and the selective pressures that preserved the surviving ancestral genes. Our findings indicate that survival was nonrandom, and in two cases, convergent across placental and marsupial mammals. We conclude that the gene content of the Y chromosome became specialized through selection to maintain the ancestral dosage of homologous X-Y gene pairs that function as broadly expressed regulators of transcription, translation and protein stability. We propose that beyond its roles in testis determination and spermatogenesis, the Y chromosome is essential for male viability, and has unappreciated roles in Turner's syndrome and in phenotypic differences between the sexes in health and disease.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4139287/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4139287/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Bellott, Daniel W -- Hughes, Jennifer F -- Skaletsky, Helen -- Brown, Laura G -- Pyntikova, Tatyana -- Cho, Ting-Jan -- Koutseva, Natalia -- Zaghlul, Sara -- Graves, Tina -- Rock, Susie -- Kremitzki, Colin -- Fulton, Robert S -- Dugan, Shannon -- Ding, Yan -- Morton, Donna -- Khan, Ziad -- Lewis, Lora -- Buhay, Christian -- Wang, Qiaoyan -- Watt, Jennifer -- Holder, Michael -- Lee, Sandy -- Nazareth, Lynne -- Alfoldi, Jessica -- Rozen, Steve -- Muzny, Donna M -- Warren, Wesley C -- Gibbs, Richard A -- Wilson, Richard K -- Page, David C -- P51 RR013986/RR/NCRR NIH HHS/ -- U54 HG003079/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- U54 HG003273/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- Howard Hughes Medical Institute/ -- England -- Nature. 2014 Apr 24;508(7497):494-9. doi: 10.1038/nature13206.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Whitehead Institute, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, & Department of Biology, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02142, USA. ; The Genome Institute, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri 63108, USA. ; Human Genome Sequencing Center, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas 77030, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24759411" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Chromosomes, Human, X/genetics ; Chromosomes, Human, Y/genetics ; Disease ; *Evolution, Molecular ; Female ; Gene Dosage/*genetics ; Gene Expression Regulation ; Health ; Humans ; Male ; Mammals/*genetics ; Marsupialia/genetics ; Molecular Sequence Annotation ; Molecular Sequence Data ; Protein Biosynthesis/genetics ; Protein Stability ; Selection, Genetic/genetics ; Sequence Homology ; Sex Characteristics ; Spermatogenesis/genetics ; Testis/metabolism ; Transcription, Genetic/genetics ; Turner Syndrome/genetics ; X Chromosome/genetics ; Y Chromosome/*genetics
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  • 7
    Publication Date: 2012-07-17
    Description: The Paisley Caves in Oregon record the oldest directly dated human remains (DNA) in the Western Hemisphere. More than 100 high-precision radiocarbon dates show that deposits containing artifacts and coprolites ranging in age from 12,450 to 2295 (14)C years ago are well stratified. Western Stemmed projectile points were recovered in deposits dated to 11,070 to 11,340 (14)C years ago, a time contemporaneous with or preceding the Clovis technology. There is no evidence of diagnostic Clovis technology at the site. These two distinct technologies were parallel developments, not the product of a unilinear technological evolution. "Blind testing" analysis of coprolites by an independent laboratory confirms the presence of human DNA in specimens of pre-Clovis age. The colonization of the Americas involved multiple technologically divergent, and possibly genetically divergent, founding groups.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Jenkins, Dennis L -- Davis, Loren G -- Stafford, Thomas W Jr -- Campos, Paula F -- Hockett, Bryan -- Jones, George T -- Cummings, Linda Scott -- Yost, Chad -- Connolly, Thomas J -- Yohe, Robert M 2nd -- Gibbons, Summer C -- Raghavan, Maanasa -- Rasmussen, Morten -- Paijmans, Johanna L A -- Hofreiter, Michael -- Kemp, Brian M -- Barta, Jodi Lynn -- Monroe, Cara -- Gilbert, M Thomas P -- Willerslev, Eske -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2012 Jul 13;337(6091):223-8. doi: 10.1126/science.1218443.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Museum of Natural and Cultural History, University of Oregon, Eugene, OR 97403, USA. djenkins@uoregon.edu〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22798611" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; *Archaeology ; *Caves ; DNA/analysis ; Emigration and Immigration/history ; Feces ; *Fossils ; History, Ancient ; Humans ; Molecular Sequence Data ; North America ; Oregon ; Population Dynamics ; Radiometric Dating ; Rodentia ; Technology/history ; Time
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  • 8
    Publication Date: 2012-10-16
    Description: The rhg1-b allele of soybean is widely used for resistance against soybean cyst nematode (SCN), the most economically damaging pathogen of soybeans in the United States. Gene silencing showed that genes in a 31-kilobase segment at rhg1-b, encoding an amino acid transporter, an alpha-SNAP protein, and a WI12 (wound-inducible domain) protein, each contribute to resistance. There is one copy of the 31-kilobase segment per haploid genome in susceptible varieties, but 10 tandem copies are present in an rhg1-b haplotype. Overexpression of the individual genes in roots was ineffective, but overexpression of the genes together conferred enhanced SCN resistance. Hence, SCN resistance mediated by the soybean quantitative trait locus Rhg1 is conferred by copy number variation that increases the expression of a set of dissimilar genes in a repeated multigene segment.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Cook, David E -- Lee, Tong Geon -- Guo, Xiaoli -- Melito, Sara -- Wang, Kai -- Bayless, Adam M -- Wang, Jianping -- Hughes, Teresa J -- Willis, David K -- Clemente, Thomas E -- Diers, Brian W -- Jiang, Jiming -- Hudson, Matthew E -- Bent, Andrew F -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2012 Nov 30;338(6111):1206-9. doi: 10.1126/science.1228746. Epub 2012 Oct 11.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Plant Pathology, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23065905" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Alleles ; Amino Acid Sequence ; Animals ; *Gene Dosage ; Gene Expression Regulation, Plant ; *Genetic Loci ; Genetic Variation ; Haplotypes ; Male ; Molecular Sequence Data ; Plant Diseases/*genetics/*parasitology ; Plant Proteins/*genetics ; Plant Roots/genetics/parasitology ; Protein Structure, Tertiary/genetics ; Soluble N-Ethylmaleimide-Sensitive Factor Attachment Proteins/genetics ; Soybeans/*genetics/*parasitology ; *Tylenchoidea
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  • 9
    Publication Date: 2015-05-07
    Description: The origin of the eukaryotic cell remains one of the most contentious puzzles in modern biology. Recent studies have provided support for the emergence of the eukaryotic host cell from within the archaeal domain of life, but the identity and nature of the putative archaeal ancestor remain a subject of debate. Here we describe the discovery of 'Lokiarchaeota', a novel candidate archaeal phylum, which forms a monophyletic group with eukaryotes in phylogenomic analyses, and whose genomes encode an expanded repertoire of eukaryotic signature proteins that are suggestive of sophisticated membrane remodelling capabilities. Our results provide strong support for hypotheses in which the eukaryotic host evolved from a bona fide archaeon, and demonstrate that many components that underpin eukaryote-specific features were already present in that ancestor. This provided the host with a rich genomic 'starter-kit' to support the increase in the cellular and genomic complexity that is characteristic of eukaryotes.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4444528/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4444528/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Spang, Anja -- Saw, Jimmy H -- Jorgensen, Steffen L -- Zaremba-Niedzwiedzka, Katarzyna -- Martijn, Joran -- Lind, Anders E -- van Eijk, Roel -- Schleper, Christa -- Guy, Lionel -- Ettema, Thijs J G -- 310039/European Research Council/International -- England -- Nature. 2015 May 14;521(7551):173-9. doi: 10.1038/nature14447. Epub 2015 May 6.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Science for Life Laboratory, Uppsala University, SE-75123 Uppsala, Sweden. ; Department of Biology, Centre for Geobiology, University of Bergen, N-5020 Bergen, Norway. ; 1] Department of Biology, Centre for Geobiology, University of Bergen, N-5020 Bergen, Norway [2] Division of Archaea Biology and Ecogenomics, Department of Ecogenomics and Systems Biology, University of Vienna, A-1090 Vienna, Austria. ; 1] Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Science for Life Laboratory, Uppsala University, SE-75123 Uppsala, Sweden [2] Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology, Uppsala University, SE-75123 Uppsala, Sweden.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25945739" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Actin Cytoskeleton/metabolism ; Actins/genetics/metabolism ; Archaea/*classification/genetics/metabolism ; Arctic Regions ; Endosomal Sorting Complexes Required for Transport/genetics/metabolism ; Eukaryota/*classification/genetics/metabolism ; Eukaryotic Cells/classification/metabolism ; *Evolution, Molecular ; Hydrothermal Vents/*microbiology ; Metagenome/genetics ; Molecular Sequence Data ; Monomeric GTP-Binding Proteins/genetics/metabolism ; *Phylogeny ; Prokaryotic Cells/*classification ; Proteome/genetics/isolation & purification/metabolism
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  • 10
    Publication Date: 1999-07-20
    Description: A vertebrate securin (vSecurin) was identified on the basis of its biochemical analogy to the Pds1p protein of budding yeast and the Cut2p protein of fission yeast. The vSecurin protein bound to a vertebrate homolog of yeast separins Esp1p and Cut1p and was degraded by proteolysis mediated by an anaphase-promoting complex in a manner dependent on a destruction motif. Furthermore, expression of a stable Xenopus securin mutant protein blocked sister-chromatid separation but did not block the embryonic cell cycle. The vSecurin proteins share extensive sequence similarity with each other but show no sequence similarity to either of their yeast counterparts. Human securin is identical to the product of the gene called pituitary tumor-transforming gene (PTTG), which is overexpressed in some tumors and exhibits transforming activity in NIH 3T3 cells. The oncogenic nature of increased expression of vSecurin may result from chromosome gain or loss, produced by errors in chromatid separation.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Zou, H -- McGarry, T J -- Bernal, T -- Kirschner, M W -- GM26875/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 1999 Jul 16;285(5426):418-22.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Cell Biology, Harvard Medical School, 240 Longwood Avenue, Boston, MA 02115, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10411507" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: 3T3 Cells ; Amino Acid Sequence ; *Anaphase ; Anaphase-Promoting Complex-Cyclosome ; Animals ; CDC2 Protein Kinase/metabolism ; Cell Cycle Proteins/chemistry/metabolism ; *Cell Transformation, Neoplastic ; Chromatids/*physiology ; Conserved Sequence ; Cyclin B/metabolism ; Cyclin B1 ; *Endopeptidases ; Fungal Proteins/chemistry/metabolism ; HeLa Cells ; Humans ; Ligases/metabolism ; Mice ; Molecular Sequence Data ; Mutagenesis, Site-Directed ; Neoplasm Proteins/chemistry/genetics/*metabolism ; Neoplasms/etiology ; Nuclear Proteins/chemistry/metabolism ; Oncogene Proteins/chemistry/genetics/*metabolism ; Oncogenes ; *Saccharomyces cerevisiae Proteins ; *Schizosaccharomyces pombe Proteins ; Securin ; Separase ; Spindle Apparatus/metabolism ; *Ubiquitin-Protein Ligase Complexes ; Ubiquitin-Protein Ligases ; Xenopus
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    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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