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  • 1
    Publication Date: 2015-10-13
    Description: Inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors (InsP3Rs) are ubiquitous ion channels responsible for cytosolic Ca(2+) signalling and essential for a broad array of cellular processes ranging from contraction to secretion, and from proliferation to cell death. Despite decades of research on InsP3Rs, a mechanistic understanding of their structure-function relationship is lacking. Here we present the first, to our knowledge, near-atomic (4.7 A) resolution electron cryomicroscopy structure of the tetrameric mammalian type 1 InsP3R channel in its apo-state. At this resolution, we are able to trace unambiguously approximately 85% of the protein backbone, allowing us to identify the structural elements involved in gating and modulation of this 1.3-megadalton channel. Although the central Ca(2+)-conduction pathway is similar to other ion channels, including the closely related ryanodine receptor, the cytosolic carboxy termini are uniquely arranged in a left-handed alpha-helical bundle, directly interacting with the amino-terminal domains of adjacent subunits. This configuration suggests a molecular mechanism for allosteric regulation of channel gating by intracellular signals.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Fan, Guizhen -- Baker, Matthew L -- Wang, Zhao -- Baker, Mariah R -- Sinyagovskiy, Pavel A -- Chiu, Wah -- Ludtke, Steven J -- Serysheva, Irina I -- P41 GM103832/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- P41GM103832/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- R01 GM072804/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- R01 GM079429/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- R01 GM080139/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- R01GM072804/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- R01GM079429/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- R01GM080139/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- R21 AR063255/AR/NIAMS NIH HHS/ -- R21 GM100229/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- R21AR063255/AR/NIAMS NIH HHS/ -- R21GM100229/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- S10 OD016279/OD/NIH HHS/ -- S10OD016279/OD/NIH HHS/ -- England -- Nature. 2015 Nov 19;527(7578):336-41. doi: 10.1038/nature15249. Epub 2015 Oct 12.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Structural Biology Imaging Center, The University of Texas Medical School at Houston, 6431 Fannin Street, Houston, Texas 77030, USA. ; National Center for Macromolecular Imaging, Verna and Marrs McLean Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Baylor College of Medicine, One Baylor Plaza, Houston, Texas 77030, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26458101" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Allosteric Regulation ; Animals ; Apoproteins/chemistry/metabolism/ultrastructure ; Calcium/metabolism ; Calcium Signaling ; *Cryoelectron Microscopy ; Cytosol/chemistry/metabolism ; Inositol 1,4,5-Trisphosphate Receptors/chemistry/*metabolism/*ultrastructure ; Ion Channel Gating ; Models, Molecular ; Protein Folding ; Protein Structure, Quaternary ; Protein Structure, Secondary ; Protein Structure, Tertiary ; Protein Subunits/chemistry/metabolism ; Rats ; Ryanodine Receptor Calcium Release Channel/chemistry/metabolism
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 2
    Publication Date: 2003-11-25
    Description: A major challenge of computational protein design is the creation of novel proteins with arbitrarily chosen three-dimensional structures. Here, we used a general computational strategy that iterates between sequence design and structure prediction to design a 93-residue alpha/beta protein called Top7 with a novel sequence and topology. Top7 was found experimentally to be folded and extremely stable, and the x-ray crystal structure of Top7 is similar (root mean square deviation equals 1.2 angstroms) to the design model. The ability to design a new protein fold makes possible the exploration of the large regions of the protein universe not yet observed in nature.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Kuhlman, Brian -- Dantas, Gautam -- Ireton, Gregory C -- Varani, Gabriele -- Stoddard, Barry L -- Baker, David -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2003 Nov 21;302(5649):1364-8.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Biochemistry, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/14631033" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Algorithms ; Amino Acid Sequence ; Circular Dichroism ; Computational Biology ; Computer Graphics ; Computer Simulation ; Crystallization ; Crystallography, X-Ray ; Databases, Protein ; Models, Molecular ; Molecular Sequence Data ; Monte Carlo Method ; Nuclear Magnetic Resonance, Biomolecular ; *Protein Conformation ; Protein Denaturation ; *Protein Engineering ; *Protein Folding ; Protein Structure, Secondary ; Proteins/*chemistry ; *Software ; Solubility ; Temperature ; Thermodynamics
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 3
    Publication Date: 2007-12-08
    Description: Many bacterial pathogens have long, slender pili through which they adhere to host cells. The crystal structure of the major pilin subunit from the Gram-positive human pathogen Streptococcus pyogenes at 2.2 angstroms resolution reveals an extended structure comprising two all-beta domains. The molecules associate in columns through the crystal, with each carboxyl terminus adjacent to a conserved lysine of the next molecule. This lysine forms the isopeptide bonds that link the subunits in native pili, validating the relevance of the crystal assembly. Each subunit contains two lysine-asparagine isopeptide bonds generated by an intramolecular reaction, and we find evidence for similar isopeptide bonds in other cell surface proteins of Gram-positive bacteria. The present structure explains the strength and stability of such Gram-positive pili and could facilitate vaccine development.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Kang, Hae Joo -- Coulibaly, Fasseli -- Clow, Fiona -- Proft, Thomas -- Baker, Edward N -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2007 Dec 7;318(5856):1625-8.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Maurice Wilkins Centre for Molecular Biodiscovery, University of Auckland, Auckland 1010, New Zealand.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18063798" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Amino Acid Motifs ; Amino Acid Sequence ; Asparagine/chemistry ; Chemistry, Physical ; Crystallography, X-Ray ; Fimbriae Proteins/*chemistry ; Fimbriae, Bacterial/*chemistry/ultrastructure ; Hydrogen Bonding ; Lysine/chemistry ; Models, Molecular ; Molecular Sequence Data ; Peptides/chemistry ; Physicochemical Phenomena ; Protein Conformation ; Protein Structure, Tertiary ; Protein Subunits/chemistry ; Streptococcus pyogenes/*chemistry/metabolism/*ultrastructure
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 4
    Publication Date: 2008-09-20
    Description: FtsZ is an essential bacterial guanosine triphosphatase and homolog of mammalian beta-tubulin that polymerizes and assembles into a ring to initiate cell division. We have created a class of small synthetic antibacterials, exemplified by PC190723, which inhibits FtsZ and prevents cell division. PC190723 has potent and selective in vitro bactericidal activity against staphylococci, including methicillin- and multi-drug-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. The putative inhibitor-binding site of PC190723 was mapped to a region of FtsZ that is analogous to the Taxol-binding site of tubulin. PC190723 was efficacious in an in vivo model of infection, curing mice infected with a lethal dose of S. aureus. The data validate FtsZ as a target for antibacterial intervention and identify PC190723 as suitable for optimization into a new anti-staphylococcal therapy.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Haydon, David J -- Stokes, Neil R -- Ure, Rebecca -- Galbraith, Greta -- Bennett, James M -- Brown, David R -- Baker, Patrick J -- Barynin, Vladimir V -- Rice, David W -- Sedelnikova, Sveta E -- Heal, Jonathan R -- Sheridan, Joseph M -- Aiwale, Sachin T -- Chauhan, Pramod K -- Srivastava, Anil -- Taneja, Amit -- Collins, Ian -- Errington, Jeff -- Czaplewski, Lloyd G -- Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council/United Kingdom -- Wellcome Trust/United Kingdom -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2008 Sep 19;321(5896):1673-5. doi: 10.1126/science.1159961.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Prolysis, Begbroke Science Park, Oxfordshire OX5 1PF, UK.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18801997" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Amino Acid Sequence ; Animals ; Anti-Bacterial Agents/*pharmacology/therapeutic use ; Bacillus subtilis/chemistry/*drug effects/genetics ; Bacterial Proteins/*antagonists & inhibitors/chemistry/genetics/metabolism ; Binding Sites ; Cell Division/drug effects ; Crystallography, X-Ray ; Cytoskeletal Proteins/*antagonists & inhibitors/chemistry/genetics/metabolism ; Drug Resistance, Bacterial/genetics ; Drug Resistance, Multiple, Bacterial ; Ligands ; Methicillin Resistance ; Mice ; Microbial Sensitivity Tests ; Models, Molecular ; Molecular Sequence Data ; Mutation ; Protein Conformation ; Pyridines/chemistry/metabolism/*pharmacology/therapeutic use ; Staphylococcal Infections/*drug therapy ; Staphylococcus aureus/chemistry/*drug effects ; Thiazoles/chemistry/metabolism/*pharmacology/therapeutic use ; Tubulin/chemistry/metabolism
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 5
    Publication Date: 2008-03-08
    Description: The creation of enzymes capable of catalyzing any desired chemical reaction is a grand challenge for computational protein design. Using new algorithms that rely on hashing techniques to construct active sites for multistep reactions, we designed retro-aldolases that use four different catalytic motifs to catalyze the breaking of a carbon-carbon bond in a nonnatural substrate. Of the 72 designs that were experimentally characterized, 32, spanning a range of protein folds, had detectable retro-aldolase activity. Designs that used an explicit water molecule to mediate proton shuffling were significantly more successful, with rate accelerations of up to four orders of magnitude and multiple turnovers, than those involving charged side-chain networks. The atomic accuracy of the design process was confirmed by the x-ray crystal structure of active designs embedded in two protein scaffolds, both of which were nearly superimposable on the design model.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3431203/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3431203/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Jiang, Lin -- Althoff, Eric A -- Clemente, Fernando R -- Doyle, Lindsey -- Rothlisberger, Daniela -- Zanghellini, Alexandre -- Gallaher, Jasmine L -- Betker, Jamie L -- Tanaka, Fujie -- Barbas, Carlos F 3rd -- Hilvert, Donald -- Houk, Kendall N -- Stoddard, Barry L -- Baker, David -- R01 CA097328/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01 GM049857/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- Howard Hughes Medical Institute/ -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2008 Mar 7;319(5868):1387-91. doi: 10.1126/science.1152692.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Biochemistry, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18323453" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Aldehyde-Lyases/*chemistry/metabolism ; *Algorithms ; Binding Sites ; Catalysis ; Catalytic Domain ; Computer Simulation ; Crystallography, X-Ray ; Hydrogen Bonding ; Hydrophobic and Hydrophilic Interactions ; Kinetics ; Models, Molecular ; Protein Conformation ; Protein Engineering
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 6
    Publication Date: 1996-10-18
    Description: The Escherichia coli DNA binding protein RuvA acts in concert with the helicase RuvB to drive branch migration of Holliday intermediates during recombination and DNA repair. The atomic structure of RuvA was determined at a resolution of 1.9 angstroms. Four monomers of RuvA are related by fourfold symmetry in a manner reminiscent of a four-petaled flower. The four DNA duplex arms of a Holliday junction can be modeled in a square planar configuration and docked into grooves on the concave surface of the protein around a central pin that may facilitate strand separation during the migration reaction. The model presented reveals how a RuvAB-junction complex may also accommodate the resolvase RuvC.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Rafferty, J B -- Sedelnikova, S E -- Hargreaves, D -- Artymiuk, P J -- Baker, P J -- Sharples, G J -- Mahdi, A A -- Lloyd, R G -- Rice, D W -- Wellcome Trust/United Kingdom -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 1996 Oct 18;274(5286):415-21.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Krebs Institute, Department of Molecular Biology and Biotechnology, University of Sheffield, Western Bank, Sheffield S10 2TN, UK. d.rice@sheffield.ac.uk〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8832889" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Bacterial Proteins/*chemistry/metabolism ; Base Composition ; Crystallography, X-Ray ; DNA Helicases/metabolism ; DNA, Bacterial/chemistry/*metabolism ; DNA-Binding Proteins/*chemistry/metabolism ; Endodeoxyribonucleases/metabolism ; Escherichia coli ; *Escherichia coli Proteins ; Hydrogen Bonding ; Models, Molecular ; *Nucleic Acid Conformation ; Oligodeoxyribonucleotides/chemistry/metabolism ; *Protein Conformation ; Protein Structure, Secondary ; Protein Structure, Tertiary ; *Recombination, Genetic
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 7
    Publication Date: 2005-09-17
    Description: The prediction of protein structure from amino acid sequence is a grand challenge of computational molecular biology. By using a combination of improved low- and high-resolution conformational sampling methods, improved atomically detailed potential functions that capture the jigsaw puzzle-like packing of protein cores, and high-performance computing, high-resolution structure prediction (〈1.5 angstroms) can be achieved for small protein domains (〈85 residues). The primary bottleneck to consistent high-resolution prediction appears to be conformational sampling.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Bradley, Philip -- Misura, Kira M S -- Baker, David -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2005 Sep 16;309(5742):1868-71.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉University of Washington, Department of Biochemistry, and Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Box 357350, Seattle, WA 98195, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16166519" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Amino Acid Sequence ; Chemistry, Physical ; *Computational Biology ; Computer Simulation ; Hydrogen Bonding ; Models, Molecular ; Monte Carlo Method ; Physicochemical Phenomena ; *Protein Conformation ; Protein Folding ; Protein Structure, Secondary ; Protein Structure, Tertiary ; Proteins/*chemistry ; Sequence Alignment ; Thermodynamics
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 8
    Publication Date: 2005-05-10
    Description: Thermostabilizing an enzyme while maintaining its activity for industrial or biomedical applications can be difficult with traditional selection methods. We describe a rapid computational approach that identified three mutations within a model enzyme that produced a 10 degrees C increase in apparent melting temperature T(m) and a 30-fold increase in half-life at 50 degrees C, with no reduction in catalytic efficiency. The effects of the mutations were synergistic, giving an increase in excess of the sum of their individual effects. The redesigned enzyme induced an increased, temperature-dependent bacterial growth rate under conditions that required its activity, thereby coupling molecular and metabolic engineering.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3412875/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3412875/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Korkegian, Aaron -- Black, Margaret E -- Baker, David -- Stoddard, Barry L -- CA85939/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- CA97328/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- GM49857/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- GM59224/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- R01 CA097328/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01 GM049857/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- T32-GM08268/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2005 May 6;308(5723):857-60.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Division of Basic Sciences, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center (FHCRC), 1100 Fairview Avenue North, Seattle, WA 98109, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15879217" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Amino Acid Sequence ; Binding Sites ; Catalysis ; Circular Dichroism ; *Computer Simulation ; Crystallography, X-Ray ; Cytosine Deaminase/*chemistry/*metabolism ; Enzyme Stability ; Escherichia coli/genetics/metabolism ; Kinetics ; Models, Molecular ; Molecular Sequence Data ; Monte Carlo Method ; Mutagenesis, Site-Directed ; Point Mutation ; Protein Conformation ; Protein Denaturation ; *Protein Engineering ; Protein Folding ; Protein Structure, Secondary ; Software ; Temperature ; Thermodynamics ; Transformation, Genetic ; Yeasts/enzymology
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 9
    Publication Date: 2011-10-25
    Description: The manipulation of protein backbone structure to control interaction and function is a challenge for protein engineering. We integrated computational design with experimental selection for grafting the backbone and side chains of a two-segment HIV gp120 epitope, targeted by the cross-neutralizing antibody b12, onto an unrelated scaffold protein. The final scaffolds bound b12 with high specificity and with affinity similar to that of gp120, and crystallographic analysis of a scaffold bound to b12 revealed high structural mimicry of the gp120-b12 complex structure. The method can be generalized to design other functional proteins through backbone grafting.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Azoitei, Mihai L -- Correia, Bruno E -- Ban, Yih-En Andrew -- Carrico, Chris -- Kalyuzhniy, Oleksandr -- Chen, Lei -- Schroeter, Alexandria -- Huang, Po-Ssu -- McLellan, Jason S -- Kwong, Peter D -- Baker, David -- Strong, Roland K -- Schief, William R -- Howard Hughes Medical Institute/ -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2011 Oct 21;334(6054):373-6. doi: 10.1126/science.1209368.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Biochemistry, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22021856" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Algorithms ; Amino Acid Motifs ; Amino Acid Sequence ; Antibodies, Monoclonal/chemistry/immunology/metabolism ; Antibodies, Neutralizing/*chemistry/*immunology/metabolism ; Antibody Affinity ; Antibody Specificity ; Antigens, CD4/metabolism ; Computational Biology ; Computer Simulation ; Crystallography, X-Ray ; Epitopes/immunology ; HIV Antibodies/chemistry/*immunology/metabolism ; HIV Envelope Protein gp120/*chemistry/*immunology/metabolism ; Models, Molecular ; Molecular Mimicry ; Molecular Sequence Data ; Mutagenesis ; Protein Conformation ; *Protein Engineering ; Protein Interaction Domains and Motifs ; Surface Plasmon Resonance
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 10
    Publication Date: 2012-06-02
    Description: We describe a general computational method for designing proteins that self-assemble to a desired symmetric architecture. Protein building blocks are docked together symmetrically to identify complementary packing arrangements, and low-energy protein-protein interfaces are then designed between the building blocks in order to drive self-assembly. We used trimeric protein building blocks to design a 24-subunit, 13-nm diameter complex with octahedral symmetry and a 12-subunit, 11-nm diameter complex with tetrahedral symmetry. The designed proteins assembled to the desired oligomeric states in solution, and the crystal structures of the complexes revealed that the resulting materials closely match the design models. The method can be used to design a wide variety of self-assembling protein nanomaterials.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4138882/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4138882/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉King, Neil P -- Sheffler, William -- Sawaya, Michael R -- Vollmar, Breanna S -- Sumida, John P -- Andre, Ingemar -- Gonen, Tamir -- Yeates, Todd O -- Baker, David -- RR-15301/RR/NCRR NIH HHS/ -- Howard Hughes Medical Institute/ -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2012 Jun 1;336(6085):1171-4. doi: 10.1126/science.1219364.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Biochemistry, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22654060" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Chromatography, Gel ; Cloning, Molecular ; Computational Biology ; Computer Simulation ; Crystallography, X-Ray ; Escherichia coli/genetics/metabolism ; Hydrogen Bonding ; Microscopy, Electron ; Models, Molecular ; Molecular Weight ; Mutation ; *Nanostructures ; *Protein Engineering ; *Protein Multimerization ; Protein Structure, Secondary ; Protein Subunits/*chemistry/genetics ; Proteins/*chemistry/genetics
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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