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  • 1
    ISSN: 1432-2048
    Keywords: Host parasite interactions ; Mistletoe ; Nutrient relations (mistletoes) ; Phoradendron ; Water relations (mistletoes)
    Source: Springer Online Journal Archives 1860-2000
    Topics: Biology
    Notes: Abstract Xylem-tapping mistletoes are known to have normally a higher rate of transpiration and lower water-use efficiency than their hosts. The relationships between water relations, nutrients and growth were investigated for Phoradendron juniperinum growing on Juniperus osteosperma (a non-nitrogen-fixing tree) and for Phoradendron californicum growing on Acacia greggii (a nitrogen-fixing tree). Xylem sap nitrogen contents were approximately 3.5 times higher in the nitrogen-fixing host than in the non-nitrogen-fixing host. The results of the present study show that mistletoe growth rates were sevenfold greater on a nitrogen-fixing host. At the same time, however, the differences in water-use efficiency between mistletoes and their hosts, which were observed on the non-nitrogen-fixing host did not exist when mistletoes were grown on hosts with higher nitrogen contents in their xylem sap. Growth rates and the accumulation of N, P, K, and Ca as well as values for carbon-isotope ratios of mistletoe tissues support the hypothesis that the higher transpiration rates of mistletoes represent a nitrogen-gathering mechanism.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 2
    ISSN: 1432-1939
    Keywords: Mimicry ; Nitrogen ; Herbivory ; Mistletoe ; Australia
    Source: Springer Online Journal Archives 1860-2000
    Topics: Biology
    Notes: Summary Leaves from many misletoe species in Australia strongly resemble those of their hosts. This cryptic mimicry has been hypothesized to be a means of reducing the likelihood of mistletoe herbivory by vertebrates. Leaf Kjeldahl nitrogen contents (a measure of reduced nitrogen and thus amines, amino acids and protein levels) of mistletoes and their hosts were measured on 48 mimetic and nonmimetic host-parasite pairs to evaluate hypotheses concerning the significance of crysis versus noncrypsis. The hypothesis that mistletoes mimicking host leaves should have higher leaf nitrogen levels than their hosts is supported; they may be gaining a selective advantage through crypsis (reduced herbivory). The second hypothesis that mistletoes which do not mimic their hosts should have lower leaf nitrogen levels than their hosts is also supported; they may be gaining a selective advantage through noncrypsis (reduced herbivory resulting from visual advertisement of their reduced nutritional status).
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  • 3
    ISSN: 1432-1939
    Keywords: Mistletoe ; Nitrogen and carbon parasite ; Carbon and nitrogen stable isotopes ; Water use efficiency ; Namibia
    Source: Springer Online Journal Archives 1860-2000
    Topics: Biology
    Notes: Summary Xylem-tapping mistletoe species growing on Mimosaccae, non-Mimosaceae and hosts performing Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) were studied along an aridity gradient in the Namib desert. °13C-values of mistletoes became more negative with decreasing nitrogen (N)-concentration in their leaves, while the host plants showed no such relationship. This might suggest that mistletoes regulate their water use efficiency according to the nitrogen supply from the host. However, further inspection of the data indicates that the relations of δ13C-values with leaf nitrogen in mistletoes may result from carbon input from the host. This is especially true for mistletoes growing on CAM plants which exhibit a very high δ13C-value, but show no evidence of CAM. It is calculated that about 60% of the carbon in mistletoes growing on C3 and on CAM hosts originated from the host. The hypothesis of Marshall and Ehleringer (1990) that xylem tapping mistletoes are also carbon parasites could explain the change in δ13C-values with N-supply and the difference in δ13C-values between mistletoes growing on C3 and CAM hosts.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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