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  • Mice  (28)
  • Surface physics, nanoscale physics, low-dimensional systems  (28)
  • 1
    Publication Date: 2007-09-18
    Description: Antibodies play a central role in immunity by forming an interface with the innate immune system and, typically, mediate proinflammatory activity. We describe a novel posttranslational modification that leads to anti-inflammatory activity of antibodies of immunoglobulin G, isotype 4 (IgG4). IgG4 antibodies are dynamic molecules that exchange Fab arms by swapping a heavy chain and attached light chain (half-molecule) with a heavy-light chain pair from another molecule, which results in bispecific antibodies. Mutagenesis studies revealed that the third constant domain is critical for this activity. The impact of IgG4 Fab arm exchange was confirmed in vivo in a rhesus monkey model with experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis. IgG4 Fab arm exchange is suggested to be an important biological mechanism that provides the basis for the anti-inflammatory activity attributed to IgG4 antibodies.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉van der Neut Kolfschoten, Marijn -- Schuurman, Janine -- Losen, Mario -- Bleeker, Wim K -- Martinez-Martinez, Pilar -- Vermeulen, Ellen -- den Bleker, Tamara H -- Wiegman, Luus -- Vink, Tom -- Aarden, Lucien A -- De Baets, Marc H -- van de Winkel, Jan G J -- Aalberse, Rob C -- Parren, Paul W H I -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2007 Sep 14;317(5844):1554-7.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Sanquin Research-AMC Landsteiner Laboratory, Department of Immunopathology, Plesmanlaan 125, 1066 CX Amsterdam, the Netherlands.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17872445" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Allergens/immunology ; Animals ; Antibodies, Bispecific/immunology ; Antibodies, Monoclonal/immunology ; Antigens, CD20/immunology ; Antigens, Plant ; Autoantibodies/immunology ; Glycoproteins/immunology ; Humans ; Immunoglobulin Constant Regions/chemistry ; Immunoglobulin Fab Fragments/*chemistry/*immunology/metabolism ; Immunoglobulin G/*chemistry/*immunology/metabolism ; Immunoglobulin Heavy Chains ; Macaca mulatta ; Mice ; Mutation ; Myasthenia Gravis, Autoimmune, Experimental/immunology/prevention & control ; Protein Processing, Post-Translational ; Receptor, Epidermal Growth Factor/immunology ; Receptors, Cholinergic/immunology
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 2
    ISSN: 0196-9781
    Keywords: Angiotensin-converting enzyme ; Captopril ; Dipeptidyl carboxypeptidases ; Enzymatic hydrolysis ; HPLC ; Met-enkephalin ; Mice ; Novelty ; Opioid peptides ; Phosphoramidon
    Source: Elsevier Journal Backfiles on ScienceDirect 1907 - 2002
    Topics: Chemistry and Pharmacology
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 3
    Publication Date: 2015-10-22
    Description: Author(s): Vincent H.-Y. Chen, Giuseppe Mallia, Ruth Martínez-Casado, and Nicholas M. Harrison The reconstruction and energetics for a range of chalcopyrite ( CuFeS 2 ) surfaces have been investigated using hybrid-exchange density functional theory. The stable nonpolar surfaces in increasing order of surface energy are (110), (102), and (114). In addition, the polar ( 112 ) / ( 112 ¯ ) surface pair was… [Phys. Rev. B 92, 155426] Published Wed Oct 21, 2015
    Keywords: Surface physics, nanoscale physics, low-dimensional systems
    Print ISSN: 1098-0121
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-3795
    Topics: Physics
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  • 4
    Publication Date: 2014-01-28
    Description: Author(s): P. Bowlan, E. Martinez-Moreno, K. Reimann, T. Elsaesser, and M. Woerner The nonlinear dynamics of electrons in multilayer epitaxial graphene is investigated by time-resolved terahertz (THz) spectroscopy in a regime where the interaction of electrons with the external field dominates over scattering processes. The predominantly coherent electron response to the THz field... [Phys. Rev. B 89, 041408] Published Mon Jan 27, 2014
    Keywords: Surface physics, nanoscale physics, low-dimensional systems
    Print ISSN: 1098-0121
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-3795
    Topics: Physics
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  • 5
    Publication Date: 2018-05-18
    Description: Author(s): R. Ortiz, N. A. García-Martínez, J. L. Lado, and J. Fernández-Rossier We propose a mechanism to drive singlet-triplet spin transitions electrically in a wide class of graphene nanostructures that present pairs of in-gap zero modes, localized at opposite sublattices. Examples are rectangular nanographenes with short zigzag edges, armchair ribbon heterojunctions with to... [Phys. Rev. B 97, 195425] Published Thu May 17, 2018
    Keywords: Surface physics, nanoscale physics, low-dimensional systems
    Print ISSN: 1098-0121
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-3795
    Topics: Physics
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  • 6
    Publication Date: 2013-09-13
    Description: Reprogramming of adult cells to generate induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS cells) has opened new therapeutic opportunities; however, little is known about the possibility of in vivo reprogramming within tissues. Here we show that transitory induction of the four factors Oct4, Sox2, Klf4 and c-Myc in mice results in teratomas emerging from multiple organs, implying that full reprogramming can occur in vivo. Analyses of the stomach, intestine, pancreas and kidney reveal groups of dedifferentiated cells that express the pluripotency marker NANOG, indicative of in situ reprogramming. By bone marrow transplantation, we demonstrate that haematopoietic cells can also be reprogrammed in vivo. Notably, reprogrammable mice present circulating iPS cells in the blood and, at the transcriptome level, these in vivo generated iPS cells are closer to embryonic stem cells (ES cells) than standard in vitro generated iPS cells. Moreover, in vivo iPS cells efficiently contribute to the trophectoderm lineage, suggesting that they achieve a more plastic or primitive state than ES cells. Finally, intraperitoneal injection of in vivo iPS cells generates embryo-like structures that express embryonic and extraembryonic markers. We conclude that reprogramming in vivo is feasible and confers totipotency features absent in standard iPS or ES cells. These discoveries could be relevant for future applications of reprogramming in regenerative medicine.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Abad, Maria -- Mosteiro, Lluc -- Pantoja, Cristina -- Canamero, Marta -- Rayon, Teresa -- Ors, Inmaculada -- Grana, Osvaldo -- Megias, Diego -- Dominguez, Orlando -- Martinez, Dolores -- Manzanares, Miguel -- Ortega, Sagrario -- Serrano, Manuel -- England -- Nature. 2013 Oct 17;502(7471):340-5. doi: 10.1038/nature12586. Epub 2013 Sep 11.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Tumour Suppression Group, Spanish National Cancer Research Centre (CNIO), Madrid E-28029, Spain.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24025773" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Blood Cells/cytology/metabolism ; Cell Dedifferentiation ; Cell Separation ; Cells, Cultured ; *Cellular Reprogramming/genetics ; Ectoderm/cytology ; Embryoid Bodies/cytology/metabolism ; Embryonic Stem Cells/cytology/metabolism ; Female ; Fibroblasts/cytology ; Gene Expression Profiling ; Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells/*cytology/metabolism ; Intestines/cytology ; Kidney/cytology ; Kruppel-Like Transcription Factors/genetics/metabolism ; Male ; Mice ; Mice, Inbred C57BL ; Octamer Transcription Factor-3/genetics/metabolism ; Organ Specificity ; Pancreas/cytology ; Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-myc/genetics/metabolism ; SOXB1 Transcription Factors/genetics/metabolism ; Stomach/cytology ; Teratoma/genetics/*metabolism/pathology ; Totipotent Stem Cells/*cytology/metabolism ; Transcriptome/genetics ; Trophoblasts/cytology
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 7
    Publication Date: 2016-03-17
    Description: The integrated stress response (ISR) is a homeostatic mechanism by which eukaryotic cells sense and respond to stress-inducing signals, such as amino acid starvation. General controlled non-repressed (GCN2) kinase is a key orchestrator of the ISR, and modulates protein synthesis in response to amino acid starvation. Here we demonstrate in mice that GCN2 controls intestinal inflammation by suppressing inflammasome activation. Enhanced activation of ISR was observed in intestinal antigen presenting cells (APCs) and epithelial cells during amino acid starvation, or intestinal inflammation. Genetic deletion of Gcn2 (also known as Eif2ka4) in CD11c(+) APCs or intestinal epithelial cells resulted in enhanced intestinal inflammation and T helper 17 cell (TH17) responses, owing to enhanced inflammasome activation and interleukin (IL)-1beta production. This was caused by reduced autophagy in Gcn2(-/-) intestinal APCs and epithelial cells, leading to increased reactive oxygen species (ROS), a potent activator of inflammasomes. Thus, conditional ablation of Atg5 or Atg7 in intestinal APCs resulted in enhanced ROS and TH17 responses. Furthermore, in vivo blockade of ROS and IL-1beta resulted in inhibition of TH17 responses and reduced inflammation in Gcn2(-/-) mice. Importantly, acute amino acid starvation suppressed intestinal inflammation via a mechanism dependent on GCN2. These results reveal a mechanism that couples amino acid sensing with control of intestinal inflammation via GCN2.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4854628/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4854628/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Ravindran, Rajesh -- Loebbermann, Jens -- Nakaya, Helder I -- Khan, Nooruddin -- Ma, Hualing -- Gama, Leonardo -- Machiah, Deepa K -- Lawson, Benton -- Hakimpour, Paul -- Wang, Yi-chong -- Li, Shuzhao -- Sharma, Prachi -- Kaufman, Randal J -- Martinez, Jennifer -- Pulendran, Bali -- R01 DK088227/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- R01 DK103185/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- R37 AI048638/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- R37 DK042394/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- R37 DK057665/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- U19 AI057266/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- U19 AI090023/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- ZIA ES103286-01/Intramural NIH HHS/ -- England -- Nature. 2016 Mar 24;531(7595):523-7. doi: 10.1038/nature17186. Epub 2016 Mar 16.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Emory Vaccine Center, Yerkes National Primate Research Center, 954 Gatewood Road, Atlanta, Georgia 30329, USA. ; School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo 05508, Brazil. ; Department of Biotechnology and Bioinformatics, School of Life Sciences, University of Hyderabad, Hyderabad 500 046, India. ; Division of Pathology, Yerkes National Primate Research Center, 954 Gatewood Road, Atlanta, Georgia 30329, USA. ; Virology Core, Emory Vaccine Center and Yerkes National Primate Research Center, 954 Gatewood Road, Atlanta, Georgia 30329, USA. ; Degenerative Disease Program, Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute, 10901 North Torrey Pines Road, La Jolla, California 92037 USA. ; National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, Mail Drop D2-01 Research Triangle Park, North Carolina 27709, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26982722" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Amino Acids/administration & dosage/deficiency/*metabolism/pharmacology ; Animals ; Antigen-Presenting Cells/immunology/metabolism ; Autophagy ; Colitis/etiology/*metabolism/pathology/prevention & control ; Disease Models, Animal ; Epithelial Cells/metabolism ; Female ; Humans ; Inflammasomes/*antagonists & inhibitors/metabolism ; Inflammation/etiology/*metabolism/pathology/prevention & control ; Interleukin-1beta/immunology ; Intestines/*metabolism/*pathology ; Male ; Mice ; Microtubule-Associated Proteins/deficiency/metabolism ; Protein-Serine-Threonine Kinases/deficiency/genetics/*metabolism ; Reactive Oxygen Species/metabolism ; Stress, Physiological ; Th17 Cells/immunology ; Ubiquitin-Activating Enzymes/deficiency/metabolism
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 8
    Publication Date: 2016-01-08
    Description: During ageing, muscle stem-cell regenerative function declines. At advanced geriatric age, this decline is maximal owing to transition from a normal quiescence into an irreversible senescence state. How satellite cells maintain quiescence and avoid senescence until advanced age remains unknown. Here we report that basal autophagy is essential to maintain the stem-cell quiescent state in mice. Failure of autophagy in physiologically aged satellite cells or genetic impairment of autophagy in young cells causes entry into senescence by loss of proteostasis, increased mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress, resulting in a decline in the function and number of satellite cells. Re-establishment of autophagy reverses senescence and restores regenerative functions in geriatric satellite cells. As autophagy also declines in human geriatric satellite cells, our findings reveal autophagy to be a decisive stem-cell-fate regulator, with implications for fostering muscle regeneration in sarcopenia.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Garcia-Prat, Laura -- Martinez-Vicente, Marta -- Perdiguero, Eusebio -- Ortet, Laura -- Rodriguez-Ubreva, Javier -- Rebollo, Elena -- Ruiz-Bonilla, Vanessa -- Gutarra, Susana -- Ballestar, Esteban -- Serrano, Antonio L -- Sandri, Marco -- Munoz-Canoves, Pura -- England -- Nature. 2016 Jan 7;529(7584):37-42. doi: 10.1038/nature16187.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Cell Biology Group, Department of Experimental and Health Sciences, Pompeu Fabra University (UPF), CIBER on Neurodegenerative diseases (CIBERNED), E-08003 Barcelona, Spain. ; Neurodegenerative Diseases Research Group, Vall d'Hebron Research Institute-CIBERNED, E-08035 Barcelona, Spain. ; Chromatin and Disease Group, Cancer Epigenetics and Biology Programme (PEBC), Bellvitge Biomedical Research Institute (IDIBELL), L'Hospitalet de Llobregat, E-08907 Barcelona, Spain. ; Advanced Fluorescence Microscopy Unit, Molecular Biology Institute of Barcelona (IBMB-CSIC), E-08028 Barcelona, Spain. ; Department of Biomedical Science, University of Padova, 35100 Padova, Italy. ; Telethon Institute of Genetics and Medicine (TIGEM), 80131 Napoli, Italy. ; ICREA, E-08908 Barcelona, Spain.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26738589" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Aging/pathology ; Animals ; Autophagy/*physiology ; *Cell Aging ; Cell Count ; Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Inhibitor p16/genetics ; Epigenesis, Genetic ; Homeostasis ; Humans ; Male ; Mice ; Mitochondria/metabolism/pathology ; Mitochondrial Degradation ; Muscle, Skeletal/cytology/pathology ; Organelles/metabolism ; Oxidative Stress ; Proteins/metabolism ; Reactive Oxygen Species/metabolism ; Regeneration ; Sarcopenia/pathology/prevention & control ; Satellite Cells, Skeletal Muscle/*cytology/pathology
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 9
    Publication Date: 2016-04-21
    Description: Defects in clearance of dying cells have been proposed to underlie the pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Mice lacking molecules associated with dying cell clearance develop SLE-like disease, and phagocytes from patients with SLE often display defective clearance and increased inflammatory cytokine production when exposed to dying cells in vitro. Previously, we and others described a form of noncanonical autophagy known as LC3-associated phagocytosis (LAP), in which phagosomes containing engulfed particles, including dying cells, recruit elements of the autophagy pathway to facilitate maturation of phagosomes and digestion of their contents. Genome-wide association studies have identified polymorphisms in the Atg5 (ref. 8) and possibly Atg7 (ref. 9) genes, involved in both canonical autophagy and LAP, as markers of a predisposition for SLE. Here we describe the consequences of defective LAP in vivo. Mice lacking any of several components of the LAP pathway show increased serum levels of inflammatory cytokines and autoantibodies, glomerular immune complex deposition, and evidence of kidney damage. When dying cells are injected into LAP-deficient mice, they are engulfed but not efficiently degraded and trigger acute elevation of pro-inflammatory cytokines but not anti-inflammatory interleukin (IL)-10. Repeated injection of dying cells into LAP-deficient, but not LAP-sufficient, mice accelerated the development of SLE-like disease, including increased serum levels of autoantibodies. By contrast, mice deficient in genes required for canonical autophagy but not LAP do not display defective dying cell clearance, inflammatory cytokine production, or SLE-like disease, and, like wild-type mice, produce IL-10 in response to dying cells. Therefore, defects in LAP, rather than canonical autophagy, can cause SLE-like phenomena, and may contribute to the pathogenesis of SLE.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4860026/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4860026/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Martinez, Jennifer -- Cunha, Larissa D -- Park, Sunmin -- Yang, Mao -- Lu, Qun -- Orchard, Robert -- Li, Quan-Zhen -- Yan, Mei -- Janke, Laura -- Guy, Cliff -- Linkermann, Andreas -- Virgin, Herbert W -- Green, Douglas R -- 1ZIAES10328601/PHS HHS/ -- R01 AI040646/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- R01 AI40646/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- U19 AI109725/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- ZIA ES103286-01/Intramural NIH HHS/ -- England -- Nature. 2016 May 5;533(7601):115-9. doi: 10.1038/nature17950. Epub 2016 Apr 20.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Immunology, St Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee 38105, USA. ; Immunity, Inflammation, and Disease Laboratory, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, 111 T.W. Alexander Drive, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina 27709, USA. ; Department of Pathology and Immunology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri 63110, USA. ; University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas 75390, USA. ; Division of Nephrology and Hypertension, Christian-Albrechts-University, Kiel 24105, Germany.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27096368" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Antigen-Antibody Complex/metabolism ; Autoantibodies/blood ; *Autophagy/genetics ; Cytokines/biosynthesis/blood ; Inflammation/blood/genetics/*pathology ; Interleukin-10/biosynthesis ; Kidney/metabolism/pathology ; Lupus Erythematosus, Systemic/blood/genetics/*immunology/*pathology ; Male ; Mice ; Microtubule-Associated Proteins/metabolism ; Phagocytes/cytology/physiology ; Phagosomes/physiology
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 10
    Publication Date: 2008-08-22
    Description: Investigation of the human antibody response to influenza virus infection has been largely limited to serology, with relatively little analysis at the molecular level. The 1918 H1N1 influenza virus pandemic was the most severe of the modern era. Recent work has recovered the gene sequences of this unusual strain, so that the 1918 pandemic virus could be reconstituted to display its unique virulence phenotypes. However, little is known about adaptive immunity to this virus. We took advantage of the 1918 virus sequencing and the resultant production of recombinant 1918 haemagglutinin (HA) protein antigen to characterize at the clonal level neutralizing antibodies induced by natural exposure of survivors to the 1918 pandemic virus. Here we show that of the 32 individuals tested that were born in or before 1915, each showed seroreactivity with the 1918 virus, nearly 90 years after the pandemic. Seven of the eight donor samples tested had circulating B cells that secreted antibodies that bound the 1918 HA. We isolated B cells from subjects and generated five monoclonal antibodies that showed potent neutralizing activity against 1918 virus from three separate donors. These antibodies also cross-reacted with the genetically similar HA of a 1930 swine H1N1 influenza strain, but did not cross-react with HAs of more contemporary human influenza viruses. The antibody genes had an unusually high degree of somatic mutation. The antibodies bound to the 1918 HA protein with high affinity, had exceptional virus-neutralizing potency and protected mice from lethal infection. Isolation of viruses that escaped inhibition suggested that the antibodies recognize classical antigenic sites on the HA surface. Thus, these studies demonstrate that survivors of the 1918 influenza pandemic possess highly functional, virus-neutralizing antibodies to this uniquely virulent virus, and that humans can sustain circulating B memory cells to viruses for many decades after exposure-well into the tenth decade of life.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2848880/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2848880/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Yu, Xiaocong -- Tsibane, Tshidi -- McGraw, Patricia A -- House, Frances S -- Keefer, Christopher J -- Hicar, Mark D -- Tumpey, Terrence M -- Pappas, Claudia -- Perrone, Lucy A -- Martinez, Osvaldo -- Stevens, James -- Wilson, Ian A -- Aguilar, Patricia V -- Altschuler, Eric L -- Basler, Christopher F -- Crowe, James E Jr -- AI057158/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- AI42266/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- CA55896/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- P01 AI058113/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- R01 AI048677/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- R01 AI048677-04/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- U19 AI057229/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- U19 AI62623/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- U54 AI057157/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- U54 AI057157-019002/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- U54 AI57158/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- England -- Nature. 2008 Sep 25;455(7212):532-6. doi: 10.1038/nature07231. Epub 2008 Aug 17.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Departments of Pediatrics, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee 37232, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18716625" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Aged, 80 and over ; Animals ; Antibodies, Monoclonal/genetics/immunology/isolation & purification ; Antibodies, Viral/genetics/*immunology/*isolation & purification ; B-Lymphocytes/*immunology ; Cell Line ; Cross Reactions/immunology ; *Disease Outbreaks/history ; Dogs ; Female ; History, 20th Century ; Humans ; Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype/genetics/*immunology/physiology ; Influenza, Human/*immunology/virology ; Kinetics ; Mice ; Mice, Inbred BALB C ; Molecular Sequence Data ; Neutralization Tests ; *Survival
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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