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  • 1
    Publication Date: 2006-11-11
    Description: Many signaling, cytoskeletal, and transport proteins have to be localized to the plasma membrane (PM) in order to carry out their function. We surveyed PM-targeting mechanisms by imaging the subcellular localization of 125 fluorescent protein-conjugated Ras, Rab, Arf, and Rho proteins. Out of 48 proteins that were PM-localized, 37 contained clusters of positively charged amino acids. To test whether these polybasic clusters bind negatively charged phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate [PI(4,5)P2] lipids, we developed a chemical phosphatase activation method to deplete PM PI(4,5)P2. Unexpectedly, proteins with polybasic clusters dissociated from the PM only when both PI(4,5)P2 and phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-trisphosphate [PI(3,4,5)P3] were depleted, arguing that both lipid second messengers jointly regulate PM targeting.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3579512/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3579512/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Heo, Won Do -- Inoue, Takanari -- Park, Wei Sun -- Kim, Man Lyang -- Park, Byung Ouk -- Wandless, Thomas J -- Meyer, Tobias -- R01 GM030179/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- R01 GM030179-24A1/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- R01 GM030179-25/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- R01 GM063702/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- R01 MH064801/MH/NIMH NIH HHS/ -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2006 Dec 1;314(5804):1458-61. Epub 2006 Nov 9.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Molecular Pharmacology, 318 Campus Drive, Clark Building, Stanford University Medical School, Stanford, CA 94305, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17095657" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: ADP-Ribosylation Factors/chemistry/metabolism ; Amino Acid Motifs ; Amino Acid Sequence ; Animals ; Cell Membrane/*metabolism ; GTP Phosphohydrolases/chemistry/*metabolism ; HeLa Cells ; Humans ; Hydrophobic and Hydrophilic Interactions ; Kinetics ; Mice ; Molecular Sequence Data ; NIH 3T3 Cells ; Phosphatidylinositol 4,5-Diphosphate/*metabolism ; Phosphatidylinositol Phosphates/*metabolism ; Second Messenger Systems ; Signal Transduction ; Static Electricity ; rab GTP-Binding Proteins/chemistry/metabolism ; ras Proteins/chemistry/metabolism ; rho GTP-Binding Proteins/metabolism
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 2
    Publication Date: 2006-10-07
    Description: Humans restrain self-interest with moral and social values. They are the only species known to exhibit reciprocal fairness, which implies the punishment of other individuals' unfair behaviors, even if it hurts the punisher's economic self-interest. Reciprocal fairness has been demonstrated in the Ultimatum Game, where players often reject their bargaining partner's unfair offers. Despite progress in recent years, however, little is known about how the human brain limits the impact of selfish motives and implements fair behavior. Here we show that disruption of the right, but not the left, dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) by low-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation substantially reduces subjects' willingness to reject their partners' intentionally unfair offers, which suggests that subjects are less able to resist the economic temptation to accept these offers. Importantly, however, subjects still judge such offers as very unfair, which indicates that the right DLPFC plays a key role in the implementation of fairness-related behaviors.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Knoch, Daria -- Pascual-Leone, Alvaro -- Meyer, Kaspar -- Treyer, Valerie -- Fehr, Ernst -- K24 RR018875/RR/NCRR NIH HHS/ -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2006 Nov 3;314(5800):829-32. Epub 2006 Oct 5.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Institute for Empirical Research in Economics, University of Zurich, Blumlisalpstrasse 10, 8006 Zurich, Switzerland. dknoch@iew.unizh.ch〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17023614" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Adult ; Decision Making ; Functional Laterality ; *Games, Experimental ; Humans ; Interpersonal Relations ; Judgment ; Male ; Prefrontal Cortex/*physiology ; *Social Behavior ; Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
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    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 3
    Publication Date: 2007-04-14
    Description: The completion of the draft sequence of the rhesus macaque genome allowed us to study the genomic composition and evolution of transposable elements in this representative of the Old World monkey lineage, a group of diverse primates closely related to humans. The L1 family of long interspersed elements appears to have evolved as a single lineage, and Alu elements have evolved into four currently active lineages. We also found evidence of elevated horizontal transmissions of retroviruses and the absence of DNA transposon activity in the Old World monkey lineage. In addition, approximately 100 precursors of composite SVA (short interspersed element, variable number of tandem repeat, and Alu) elements were identified, with the majority being shared by the common ancestor of humans and rhesus macaques. Mobile elements compose roughly 50% of primate genomes, and our findings illustrate their diversity and strong influence on genome evolution between closely related species.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Han, Kyudong -- Konkel, Miriam K -- Xing, Jinchuan -- Wang, Hui -- Lee, Jungnam -- Meyer, Thomas J -- Huang, Charles T -- Sandifer, Erin -- Hebert, Kristi -- Barnes, Erin W -- Hubley, Robert -- Miller, Webb -- Smit, Arian F A -- Ullmer, Brygg -- Batzer, Mark A -- GM59290/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- R01 HG002939/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2007 Apr 13;316(5822):238-40.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Biological Sciences, Biological Computation and Visualization Center, Center for Bio-Modular Multi-Scale Systems, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17431169" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Cercopithecidae/*genetics ; *DNA Transposable Elements ; Endogenous Retroviruses/genetics ; Evolution, Molecular ; Gene Transfer, Horizontal ; Genome ; Genome, Human ; Humans ; Macaca mulatta/*genetics ; Repetitive Sequences, Nucleic Acid ; Retroelements
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
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    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 4
    Publication Date: 2007-04-28
    Description: New strategies for prevention and treatment of type 2 diabetes (T2D) require improved insight into disease etiology. We analyzed 386,731 common single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 1464 patients with T2D and 1467 matched controls, each characterized for measures of glucose metabolism, lipids, obesity, and blood pressure. With collaborators (FUSION and WTCCC/UKT2D), we identified and confirmed three loci associated with T2D-in a noncoding region near CDKN2A and CDKN2B, in an intron of IGF2BP2, and an intron of CDKAL1-and replicated associations near HHEX and in SLC30A8 found by a recent whole-genome association study. We identified and confirmed association of a SNP in an intron of glucokinase regulatory protein (GCKR) with serum triglycerides. The discovery of associated variants in unsuspected genes and outside coding regions illustrates the ability of genome-wide association studies to provide potentially important clues to the pathogenesis of common diseases.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Diabetes Genetics Initiative of Broad Institute of Harvard and MIT, Lund University, and Novartis Institutes of BioMedical Research -- Saxena, Richa -- Voight, Benjamin F -- Lyssenko, Valeriya -- Burtt, Noel P -- de Bakker, Paul I W -- Chen, Hong -- Roix, Jeffrey J -- Kathiresan, Sekar -- Hirschhorn, Joel N -- Daly, Mark J -- Hughes, Thomas E -- Groop, Leif -- Altshuler, David -- Almgren, Peter -- Florez, Jose C -- Meyer, Joanne -- Ardlie, Kristin -- Bengtsson Bostrom, Kristina -- Isomaa, Bo -- Lettre, Guillaume -- Lindblad, Ulf -- Lyon, Helen N -- Melander, Olle -- Newton-Cheh, Christopher -- Nilsson, Peter -- Orho-Melander, Marju -- Rastam, Lennart -- Speliotes, Elizabeth K -- Taskinen, Marja-Riitta -- Tuomi, Tiinamaija -- Guiducci, Candace -- Berglund, Anna -- Carlson, Joyce -- Gianniny, Lauren -- Hackett, Rachel -- Hall, Liselotte -- Holmkvist, Johan -- Laurila, Esa -- Sjogren, Marketa -- Sterner, Maria -- Surti, Aarti -- Svensson, Margareta -- Svensson, Malin -- Tewhey, Ryan -- Blumenstiel, Brendan -- Parkin, Melissa -- Defelice, Matthew -- Barry, Rachel -- Brodeur, Wendy -- Camarata, Jody -- Chia, Nancy -- Fava, Mary -- Gibbons, John -- Handsaker, Bob -- Healy, Claire -- Nguyen, Kieu -- Gates, Casey -- Sougnez, Carrie -- Gage, Diane -- Nizzari, Marcia -- Gabriel, Stacey B -- Chirn, Gung-Wei -- Ma, Qicheng -- Parikh, Hemang -- Richardson, Delwood -- Ricke, Darrell -- Purcell, Shaun -- F32 DK079466/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- F32 DK079466-01/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- K23 DK067288/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- K23 DK080145/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- K23 DK080145-01/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- K23 DK65978-04/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- K23-HL083102/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS/ -- U01 HG004171/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2007 Jun 1;316(5829):1331-6. Epub 2007 Apr 26.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Broad Institute of Harvard and Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA 02142, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17463246" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Adaptor Proteins, Signal Transducing/genetics ; Aged ; Alleles ; Blood Glucose/analysis ; Case-Control Studies ; Chromosome Mapping ; Chromosomes, Human, Pair 9/genetics ; Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/*genetics ; Female ; Genetic Markers ; *Genetic Predisposition to Disease ; *Genome, Human ; Genotype ; Haplotypes ; Humans ; Insulin Resistance/genetics ; Insulin-Like Growth Factor Binding Proteins/genetics ; Introns ; Male ; Meta-Analysis as Topic ; Middle Aged ; *Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide ; Quantitative Trait, Heritable ; Triglycerides/*blood
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
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    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 5
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    American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS)
    Publication Date: 2008-08-09
    Description: 〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2008 Aug 8;321(5890):778-80. doi: 10.1126/science.1162908.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Central Institute of Mental Health, J5, University of Heidelberg, 68159 Mannheim, Germany. a.meyerlindenberg@zi-mannheim.de〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18687945" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Borderline Personality Disorder/*physiopathology/*psychology ; Cerebral Cortex/*physiopathology ; *Cooperative Behavior ; *Games, Experimental ; Humans ; Social Behavior ; Trust/*psychology
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  • 6
    Publication Date: 2009-05-02
    Description: Schizophrenia is a devastating, highly heritable brain disorder of unknown etiology. Recently, the first common genetic variant associated on a genome-wide level with schizophrenia and possibly bipolar disorder was discovered in ZNF804A (rs1344706). We show, by using an imaging genetics approach, that healthy carriers of rs1344706 risk genotypes exhibit no changes in regional activity but pronounced gene dosage-dependent alterations in functional coupling (correlated activity) of dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) across hemispheres and with hippocampus, mirroring findings in patients, and abnormal coupling of amygdala. Our findings establish disturbed connectivity as a neurogenetic risk mechanism for psychosis supported by genome-wide association, show that rs1344706 or variation in linkage disequilibrium is functional in human brain, and validate the intermediate phenotype strategy in psychiatry.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Esslinger, Christine -- Walter, Henrik -- Kirsch, Peter -- Erk, Susanne -- Schnell, Knut -- Arnold, Claudia -- Haddad, Leila -- Mier, Daniela -- Opitz von Boberfeld, Carola -- Raab, Kyeon -- Witt, Stephanie H -- Rietschel, Marcella -- Cichon, Sven -- Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2009 May 1;324(5927):605. doi: 10.1126/science.1167768.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Central Institute of Mental Health, University of Heidelberg, J5, 68159 Mannheim, Germany.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19407193" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Adult ; Affective Symptoms/genetics/physiopathology ; Bipolar Disorder/genetics/physiopathology ; Brain Mapping ; Female ; Genetic Predisposition to Disease ; Genome-Wide Association Study ; Genotype ; Hippocampus/*physiology ; Humans ; Kruppel-Like Transcription Factors/*genetics ; Magnetic Resonance Imaging ; Male ; Mental Processes ; Phenotype ; *Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide ; Prefrontal Cortex/*physiology ; Schizophrenia/*genetics/physiopathology
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
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    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 7
    Publication Date: 2010-05-08
    Description: It is now possible to perform whole-genome shotgun sequencing as well as capture of specific genomic regions for extinct organisms. However, targeted resequencing of large parts of nuclear genomes has yet to be demonstrated for ancient DNA. Here we show that hybridization capture on microarrays can successfully recover more than a megabase of target regions from Neandertal DNA even in the presence of approximately 99.8% microbial DNA. Using this approach, we have sequenced approximately 14,000 protein-coding positions inferred to have changed on the human lineage since the last common ancestor shared with chimpanzees. By generating the sequence of one Neandertal and 50 present-day humans at these positions, we have identified 88 amino acid substitutions that have become fixed in humans since our divergence from the Neandertals.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3140021/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3140021/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Burbano, Hernan A -- Hodges, Emily -- Green, Richard E -- Briggs, Adrian W -- Krause, Johannes -- Meyer, Matthias -- Good, Jeffrey M -- Maricic, Tomislav -- Johnson, Philip L F -- Xuan, Zhenyu -- Rooks, Michelle -- Bhattacharjee, Arindam -- Brizuela, Leonardo -- Albert, Frank W -- de la Rasilla, Marco -- Fortea, Javier -- Rosas, Antonio -- Lachmann, Michael -- Hannon, Gregory J -- Paabo, Svante -- P01 CA013106/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- P01 CA013106-38/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- P01 CA013106-39/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- Howard Hughes Medical Institute/ -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2010 May 7;328(5979):723-5. doi: 10.1126/science.1188046.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, D-04103 Leipzig, Germany.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20448179" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Amino Acid Substitution ; Animals ; Fossils ; Genes ; *Genome ; *Genome, Human ; Hominidae/*genetics ; Humans ; Nucleic Acid Hybridization ; Oligonucleotide Array Sequence Analysis/*methods ; Pan troglodytes/genetics ; Proteins/chemistry/genetics ; Sequence Alignment ; Sequence Analysis, DNA/*methods
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  • 8
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    American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS)
    Publication Date: 2012-01-28
    Description: 〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Meyer, Kaspar -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2012 Jan 27;335(6067):415-6. doi: 10.1126/science.1214652.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Brain and Creativity Institute, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90089, USA. kaspar.meyer@usc.edu〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22282799" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Brain/*physiology ; Brain Mapping ; *Consciousness ; Humans ; Mental Recall ; Models, Neurological ; Neural Pathways/physiology ; *Perception ; Pyramidal Cells/physiology ; Visual Cortex/physiology ; *Visual Perception
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    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 9
    Publication Date: 2012-09-01
    Description: We present a DNA library preparation method that has allowed us to reconstruct a high-coverage (30x) genome sequence of a Denisovan, an extinct relative of Neandertals. The quality of this genome allows a direct estimation of Denisovan heterozygosity indicating that genetic diversity in these archaic hominins was extremely low. It also allows tentative dating of the specimen on the basis of "missing evolution" in its genome, detailed measurements of Denisovan and Neandertal admixture into present-day human populations, and the generation of a near-complete catalog of genetic changes that swept to high frequency in modern humans since their divergence from Denisovans.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3617501/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3617501/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Meyer, Matthias -- Kircher, Martin -- Gansauge, Marie-Theres -- Li, Heng -- Racimo, Fernando -- Mallick, Swapan -- Schraiber, Joshua G -- Jay, Flora -- Prufer, Kay -- de Filippo, Cesare -- Sudmant, Peter H -- Alkan, Can -- Fu, Qiaomei -- Do, Ron -- Rohland, Nadin -- Tandon, Arti -- Siebauer, Michael -- Green, Richard E -- Bryc, Katarzyna -- Briggs, Adrian W -- Stenzel, Udo -- Dabney, Jesse -- Shendure, Jay -- Kitzman, Jacob -- Hammer, Michael F -- Shunkov, Michael V -- Derevianko, Anatoli P -- Patterson, Nick -- Andres, Aida M -- Eichler, Evan E -- Slatkin, Montgomery -- Reich, David -- Kelso, Janet -- Paabo, Svante -- GM100233/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- R01 GM040282/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- R01 GM100233/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- R01-GM40282/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- Howard Hughes Medical Institute/ -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2012 Oct 12;338(6104):222-6. doi: 10.1126/science.1224344. Epub 2012 Aug 30.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Evolutionary Genetics, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, D-04103 Leipzig, Germany. mmeyer@eva.mpg.de〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22936568" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Alleles ; Animals ; Base Sequence ; Fossils ; Gene Flow ; Gene Library ; *Genetic Variation ; Genome, Human/*genetics ; *Heterozygote ; Humans ; Molecular Sequence Data ; Neanderthals/*genetics ; Sequence Analysis, DNA
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  • 10
    Publication Date: 2013-03-02
    Description: Prenatal infection and exposure to traumatizing experiences during peripuberty have each been associated with increased risk for neuropsychiatric disorders. Evidence is lacking for the cumulative impact of such prenatal and postnatal environmental challenges on brain functions and vulnerability to psychiatric disease. Here, we show in a translational mouse model that combined exposure to prenatal immune challenge and peripubertal stress induces synergistic pathological effects on adult behavioral functions and neurochemistry. We further demonstrate that the prenatal insult markedly increases the vulnerability of the pubescent offspring to brain immune changes in response to stress. Our findings reveal interactions between two adverse environmental factors that have individually been associated with neuropsychiatric disease and support theories that mental illnesses with delayed onsets involve multiple environmental hits.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Giovanoli, Sandra -- Engler, Harald -- Engler, Andrea -- Richetto, Juliet -- Voget, Mareike -- Willi, Roman -- Winter, Christine -- Riva, Marco A -- Mortensen, Preben B -- Feldon, Joram -- Schedlowski, Manfred -- Meyer, Urs -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2013 Mar 1;339(6123):1095-9. doi: 10.1126/science.1228261.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Physiology and Behavior Laboratory, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETH) Zurich, 8603 Schwerzenbach, Switzerland.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23449593" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Cytokines/immunology ; Disease Models, Animal ; Female ; Humans ; Mental Disorders/*immunology ; Mice ; Mice, Inbred C57BL ; Poly I-C/immunology/pharmacology ; Pregnancy ; Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects/*immunology/virology ; Puberty/*immunology ; Stress, Physiological/*immunology
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    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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