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  • 1
    Publication Date: 2011-09-10
    Description: Our goal is to develop a vaccine that sustainably prevents Plasmodium falciparum (Pf) malaria in 〉/=80% of recipients. Pf sporozoites (PfSPZ) administered by mosquito bites are the only immunogens shown to induce such protection in humans. Such protection is thought to be mediated by CD8(+) T cells in the liver that secrete interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma). We report that purified irradiated PfSPZ administered to 80 volunteers by needle inoculation in the skin was safe, but suboptimally immunogenic and protective. Animal studies demonstrated that intravenous immunization was critical for inducing a high frequency of PfSPZ-specific CD8(+), IFN-gamma-producing T cells in the liver (nonhuman primates, mice) and conferring protection (mice). Our results suggest that intravenous administration of this vaccine will lead to the prevention of infection with Pf malaria.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Epstein, J E -- Tewari, K -- Lyke, K E -- Sim, B K L -- Billingsley, P F -- Laurens, M B -- Gunasekera, A -- Chakravarty, S -- James, E R -- Sedegah, M -- Richman, A -- Velmurugan, S -- Reyes, S -- Li, M -- Tucker, K -- Ahumada, A -- Ruben, A J -- Li, T -- Stafford, R -- Eappen, A G -- Tamminga, C -- Bennett, J W -- Ockenhouse, C F -- Murphy, J R -- Komisar, J -- Thomas, N -- Loyevsky, M -- Birkett, A -- Plowe, C V -- Loucq, C -- Edelman, R -- Richie, T L -- Seder, R A -- Hoffman, S L -- 5R44AI055229-07/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- 5R44AI058375-05/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- 5R44AI058499-05/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- Howard Hughes Medical Institute/ -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2011 Oct 28;334(6055):475-80. doi: 10.1126/science.1211548. Epub 2011 Sep 8.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉U.S. Military Malaria Vaccine Program, Naval Medical Research Center, Silver Spring, MD 20910, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21903775" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Adolescent ; Adult ; Animals ; Antibodies, Protozoan/blood/immunology ; Antigens, Protozoan/immunology ; CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes/*immunology ; Humans ; Injections, Intravenous ; Injections, Subcutaneous ; Interferon-gamma/biosynthesis/immunology ; Liver/*immunology ; Macaca mulatta ; Malaria Vaccines/administration & dosage/adverse effects/*immunology ; Malaria, Falciparum/*prevention & control ; Mice ; Middle Aged ; Plasmodium falciparum/*immunology ; Rabbits ; Sporozoites/*immunology ; Vaccines, Attenuated/administration & dosage/adverse effects/immunology ; Young Adult
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 2
    Publication Date: 2012-04-14
    Description: Drug use and relapse involve learned associations between drug-associated environmental cues and drug effects. Extinction procedures in the clinic can suppress conditioned responses to drug cues, but the extinguished responses typically reemerge after exposure to the drug itself (reinstatement), the drug-associated environment (renewal), or the passage of time (spontaneous recovery). We describe a memory retrieval-extinction procedure that decreases conditioned drug effects and drug seeking in rat models of relapse, and drug craving in abstinent heroin addicts. In rats, daily retrieval of drug-associated memories 10 minutes or 1 hour but not 6 hours before extinction sessions attenuated drug-induced reinstatement, spontaneous recovery, and renewal of conditioned drug effects and drug seeking. In heroin addicts, retrieval of drug-associated memories 10 minutes before extinction sessions attenuated cue-induced heroin craving 1, 30, and 180 days later. The memory retrieval-extinction procedure is a promising nonpharmacological method for decreasing drug craving and relapse during abstinence.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3695463/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3695463/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Xue, Yan-Xue -- Luo, Yi-Xiao -- Wu, Ping -- Shi, Hai-Shui -- Xue, Li-Fen -- Chen, Chen -- Zhu, Wei-Li -- Ding, Zeng-Bo -- Bao, Yan-ping -- Shi, Jie -- Epstein, David H -- Shaham, Yavin -- Lu, Lin -- Z99 DA999999/Intramural NIH HHS/ -- ZIA DA000434-12/Intramural NIH HHS/ -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2012 Apr 13;336(6078):241-5. doi: 10.1126/science.1215070.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉National Institute on Drug Dependence, Peking University, Beijing, China.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22499948" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Amygdala/enzymology ; Animals ; Behavior, Addictive/*prevention & control ; Cocaine/administration & dosage ; Cocaine-Related Disorders/*psychology/therapy ; Conditioning, Classical ; Conditioning, Operant ; Cues ; *Extinction, Psychological ; Heroin/administration & dosage ; Heroin Dependence/*psychology/therapy ; Humans ; Male ; *Memory ; Mental Recall ; Models, Animal ; Prefrontal Cortex/enzymology ; Protein Kinase C/metabolism ; Rats ; Rats, Sprague-Dawley ; Recurrence ; Self Administration ; Time Factors
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 3
    Publication Date: 1996-06-14
    Description: The basal cell nevus syndrome (BCNS) is characterized by developmental abnormalities and by the postnatal occurrence of cancers, especially basal cell carcinomas (BCCs), the most common human cancer. Heritable mutations in BCNS patients and a somatic mutation in a sporadic BCC were identified in a human homolog of the Drosophila patched (ptc) gene. The ptc gene encodes a transmembrane protein that in Drosophila acts in opposition to the Hedgehog signaling protein, controlling cell fates, patterning, and growth in numerous tissues. The human PTC gene appears to be crucial for proper embryonic development and for tumor suppression.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Johnson, R L -- Rothman, A L -- Xie, J -- Goodrich, L V -- Bare, J W -- Bonifas, J M -- Quinn, A G -- Myers, R M -- Cox, D R -- Epstein, E H Jr -- Scott, M P -- AR3995/AR/NIAMS NIH HHS/ -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 1996 Jun 14;272(5268):1668-71.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Developmental Biology, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, California 94305-5427, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8658145" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Adult ; Amino Acid Sequence ; Animals ; Basal Cell Nevus Syndrome/*genetics ; Base Sequence ; Cloning, Molecular ; DNA, Neoplasm ; Drosophila ; *Drosophila Proteins ; Female ; Frameshift Mutation ; *Genes, Tumor Suppressor ; Humans ; Insect Hormones/genetics ; Male ; Membrane Proteins/*genetics ; Middle Aged ; Molecular Sequence Data ; Polymerase Chain Reaction ; Polymorphism, Single-Stranded Conformational ; Protein Conformation ; Receptors, Cell Surface
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 4
    Publication Date: 2005-10-01
    Description: Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) emerged in 2002 to 2003 in southern China. The origin of its etiological agent, the SARS coronavirus (SARS-CoV), remains elusive. Here we report that species of bats are a natural host of coronaviruses closely related to those responsible for the SARS outbreak. These viruses, termed SARS-like coronaviruses (SL-CoVs), display greater genetic variation than SARS-CoV isolated from humans or from civets. The human and civet isolates of SARS-CoV nestle phylogenetically within the spectrum of SL-CoVs, indicating that the virus responsible for the SARS outbreak was a member of this coronavirus group.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Li, Wendong -- Shi, Zhengli -- Yu, Meng -- Ren, Wuze -- Smith, Craig -- Epstein, Jonathan H -- Wang, Hanzhong -- Crameri, Gary -- Hu, Zhihong -- Zhang, Huajun -- Zhang, Jianhong -- McEachern, Jennifer -- Field, Hume -- Daszak, Peter -- Eaton, Bryan T -- Zhang, Shuyi -- Wang, Lin-Fa -- R01-TW05869/TW/FIC NIH HHS/ -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2005 Oct 28;310(5748):676-9. Epub 2005 Sep 29.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), Beijing, China.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16195424" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Amino Acid Sequence ; Animals ; Cercopithecus aethiops ; China/epidemiology ; Chiroptera/*virology ; Communicable Diseases, Emerging ; *Coronavirus/classification ; Disease Outbreaks ; *Disease Reservoirs ; Genetic Variation ; Genome, Viral ; Henipavirus/classification ; Humans ; Molecular Sequence Data ; Mutation ; Phylogeny ; Polymerase Chain Reaction ; *SARS Virus/classification ; Sequence Analysis, DNA ; Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/epidemiology/transmission/virology ; Vero Cells ; Viverridae/virology
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 5
    Publication Date: 1998-03-07
    Description: 〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Colwell, R R -- Epstein, P R -- Gubler, D -- Maynard, N -- McMichael, A J -- Patz, J A -- Sack, R B -- Shope, R -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 1998 Feb 13;279(5353):968-9.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9490480" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: *Climate ; Humans ; *Public Health ; Public Health Practice ; Research ; Risk Assessment
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 6
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    American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS)
    Publication Date: 1999-08-07
    Description: 〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Epstein, P R -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 1999 Jul 16;285(5426):347-8.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Center for Health and the Global Environment, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115, USA. paul_epstein@hms.harvard.edu〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10438299" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Africa, Eastern/epidemiology ; Animals ; *Climate ; Communicable Disease Control ; Communicable Diseases/*epidemiology/etiology ; Disease Outbreaks ; Ecosystem ; Forecasting ; *Global Health ; Humans ; Rift Valley Fever/*epidemiology/etiology/veterinary ; *Weather
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 7
    Publication Date: 1999-01-29
    Description: A carbapenem antibiotic, L-786,392, was designed so that the side chain that provides high-affinity binding to the penicillin-binding proteins responsible for bacterial resistance was also the structural basis for ameliorating immunopathology. Expulsion of the side chain upon opening of the beta-lactam ring retained antibacterial activity while safely expelling the immunodominant epitope. L-786,392 was well tolerated in animal safety studies and had significant in vitro and in vivo activities against methicillin- and vancomycin-resistant Staphylococci and vancomycin-resistant Enterococci.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Rosen, H -- Hajdu, R -- Silver, L -- Kropp, H -- Dorso, K -- Kohler, J -- Sundelof, J G -- Huber, J -- Hammond, G G -- Jackson, J J -- Gill, C J -- Thompson, R -- Pelak, B A -- Epstein-Toney, J H -- Lankas, G -- Wilkening, R R -- Wildonger, K J -- Blizzard, T A -- DiNinno, F P -- Ratcliffe, R W -- Heck, J V -- Kozarich, J W -- Hammond, M L -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 1999 Jan 29;283(5402):703-6.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Merck Research Laboratories, Rahway, NJ 07065, USA. hugh_rosen@merck.com〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9924033" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Antibodies/blood ; *Bacterial Proteins ; Carbapenems/chemistry/*immunology/metabolism/*pharmacology/toxicity ; Carrier Proteins/metabolism ; Dipeptidases/metabolism ; *Drug Design ; Drug Resistance, Microbial ; Drug Resistance, Multiple ; Enterococcus/drug effects ; Erythrocytes/immunology ; Haptens ; *Hexosyltransferases ; Humans ; Immunodominant Epitopes ; Immunoglobulin G/blood ; Lactams/chemical synthesis/chemistry/metabolism/*pharmacology ; Lymphocyte Activation ; Macaca mulatta ; Mice ; Mice, Inbred DBA ; Microbial Sensitivity Tests ; Muramoylpentapeptide Carboxypeptidase/metabolism ; Penicillin-Binding Proteins ; *Peptidyl Transferases ; Staphylococcal Infections/drug therapy ; Staphylococcus/drug effects ; Thiazoles/chemical synthesis/chemistry/metabolism/*pharmacology
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 8
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    American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS)
    Publication Date: 2005-03-19
    Description: 〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Yuspa, Stuart H -- Epstein, Ervin H Jr -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2005 Mar 18;307(5716):1727-8.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Laboratory of Cellular Carcinogenesis and Tumor Promotion, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA. sy12j@nih.gov〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15774745" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Carcinoma, Squamous Cell/etiology/genetics/pathology/*physiopathology ; Cell Adhesion Molecules/metabolism ; Cell Transformation, Neoplastic ; Collagen Type VII/chemistry/*genetics/*physiology ; Disease Susceptibility ; Epidermolysis Bullosa Dystrophica/complications/*genetics/metabolism/pathology ; Genes, ras ; Humans ; I-kappa B Proteins/genetics/metabolism ; Keratinocytes/*metabolism/pathology ; Mice ; Mutation ; Neoplasm Invasiveness ; Protein Structure, Tertiary ; Skin Neoplasms/etiology/genetics/pathology/*physiopathology ; Transduction, Genetic ; Transforming Growth Factor beta/metabolism
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 9
    Publication Date: 2013-08-10
    Description: Consistent, high-level, vaccine-induced protection against human malaria has only been achieved by inoculation of Plasmodium falciparum (Pf) sporozoites (SPZ) by mosquito bites. We report that the PfSPZ Vaccine--composed of attenuated, aseptic, purified, cryopreserved PfSPZ--was safe and well tolerated when administered four to six times intravenously (IV) to 40 adults. Zero of six subjects receiving five doses and three of nine subjects receiving four doses of 1.35 x 10(5) PfSPZ Vaccine and five of six nonvaccinated controls developed malaria after controlled human malaria infection (P = 0.015 in the five-dose group and P = 0.028 for overall, both versus controls). PfSPZ-specific antibody and T cell responses were dose-dependent. These data indicate that there is a dose-dependent immunological threshold for establishing high-level protection against malaria that can be achieved with IV administration of a vaccine that is safe and meets regulatory standards.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Seder, Robert A -- Chang, Lee-Jah -- Enama, Mary E -- Zephir, Kathryn L -- Sarwar, Uzma N -- Gordon, Ingelise J -- Holman, LaSonji A -- James, Eric R -- Billingsley, Peter F -- Gunasekera, Anusha -- Richman, Adam -- Chakravarty, Sumana -- Manoj, Anita -- Velmurugan, Soundarapandian -- Li, MingLin -- Ruben, Adam J -- Li, Tao -- Eappen, Abraham G -- Stafford, Richard E -- Plummer, Sarah H -- Hendel, Cynthia S -- Novik, Laura -- Costner, Pamela J M -- Mendoza, Floreliz H -- Saunders, Jamie G -- Nason, Martha C -- Richardson, Jason H -- Murphy, Jittawadee -- Davidson, Silas A -- Richie, Thomas L -- Sedegah, Martha -- Sutamihardja, Awalludin -- Fahle, Gary A -- Lyke, Kirsten E -- Laurens, Matthew B -- Roederer, Mario -- Tewari, Kavita -- Epstein, Judith E -- Sim, B Kim Lee -- Ledgerwood, Julie E -- Graham, Barney S -- Hoffman, Stephen L -- VRC 312 Study Team -- 3R44AI055229-06S1/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- 4R44AI055229-08/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- 5R44AI058499-05/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- N01-AI-40096/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- Intramural NIH HHS/ -- Howard Hughes Medical Institute/ -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2013 Sep 20;341(6152):1359-65. doi: 10.1126/science.1241800. Epub 2013 Aug 8.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Vaccine Research Center, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20852, USA. rseder@mail.nih.gov〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23929949" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Administration, Intravenous ; Adult ; Animals ; Cytokines/immunology ; Female ; Humans ; Immunity, Cellular ; Malaria Vaccines/*administration & dosage/adverse effects/*immunology ; Malaria, Falciparum/*prevention & control ; Male ; Mice ; Plasmodium falciparum/*immunology ; Sporozoites/immunology ; T-Lymphocytes/immunology ; Vaccination/adverse effects/methods
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    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 10
    Publication Date: 2014-08-29
    Description: Genome function is dynamically regulated in part by chromatin, which consists of the histones, non-histone proteins and RNA molecules that package DNA. Studies in Caenorhabditis elegans and Drosophila melanogaster have contributed substantially to our understanding of molecular mechanisms of genome function in humans, and have revealed conservation of chromatin components and mechanisms. Nevertheless, the three organisms have markedly different genome sizes, chromosome architecture and gene organization. On human and fly chromosomes, for example, pericentric heterochromatin flanks single centromeres, whereas worm chromosomes have dispersed heterochromatin-like regions enriched in the distal chromosomal 'arms', and centromeres distributed along their lengths. To systematically investigate chromatin organization and associated gene regulation across species, we generated and analysed a large collection of genome-wide chromatin data sets from cell lines and developmental stages in worm, fly and human. Here we present over 800 new data sets from our ENCODE and modENCODE consortia, bringing the total to over 1,400. Comparison of combinatorial patterns of histone modifications, nuclear lamina-associated domains, organization of large-scale topological domains, chromatin environment at promoters and enhancers, nucleosome positioning, and DNA replication patterns reveals many conserved features of chromatin organization among the three organisms. We also find notable differences in the composition and locations of repressive chromatin. These data sets and analyses provide a rich resource for comparative and species-specific investigations of chromatin composition, organization and function.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4227084/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4227084/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Ho, Joshua W K -- Jung, Youngsook L -- Liu, Tao -- Alver, Burak H -- Lee, Soohyun -- Ikegami, Kohta -- Sohn, Kyung-Ah -- Minoda, Aki -- Tolstorukov, Michael Y -- Appert, Alex -- Parker, Stephen C J -- Gu, Tingting -- Kundaje, Anshul -- Riddle, Nicole C -- Bishop, Eric -- Egelhofer, Thea A -- Hu, Sheng'en Shawn -- Alekseyenko, Artyom A -- Rechtsteiner, Andreas -- Asker, Dalal -- Belsky, Jason A -- Bowman, Sarah K -- Chen, Q Brent -- Chen, Ron A-J -- Day, Daniel S -- Dong, Yan -- Dose, Andrea C -- Duan, Xikun -- Epstein, Charles B -- Ercan, Sevinc -- Feingold, Elise A -- Ferrari, Francesco -- Garrigues, Jacob M -- Gehlenborg, Nils -- Good, Peter J -- Haseley, Psalm -- He, Daniel -- Herrmann, Moritz -- Hoffman, Michael M -- Jeffers, Tess E -- Kharchenko, Peter V -- Kolasinska-Zwierz, Paulina -- Kotwaliwale, Chitra V -- Kumar, Nischay -- Langley, Sasha A -- Larschan, Erica N -- Latorre, Isabel -- Libbrecht, Maxwell W -- Lin, Xueqiu -- Park, Richard -- Pazin, Michael J -- Pham, Hoang N -- Plachetka, Annette -- Qin, Bo -- Schwartz, Yuri B -- Shoresh, Noam -- Stempor, Przemyslaw -- Vielle, Anne -- Wang, Chengyang -- Whittle, Christina M -- Xue, Huiling -- Kingston, Robert E -- Kim, Ju Han -- Bernstein, Bradley E -- Dernburg, Abby F -- Pirrotta, Vincenzo -- Kuroda, Mitzi I -- Noble, William S -- Tullius, Thomas D -- Kellis, Manolis -- MacAlpine, David M -- Strome, Susan -- Elgin, Sarah C R -- Liu, Xiaole Shirley -- Lieb, Jason D -- Ahringer, Julie -- Karpen, Gary H -- Park, Peter J -- 092096/Wellcome Trust/United Kingdom -- 101863/Wellcome Trust/United Kingdom -- 54523/Wellcome Trust/United Kingdom -- 5RL9EB008539/EB/NIBIB NIH HHS/ -- K99 HG006259/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- K99HG006259/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- R01 GM098461/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- R01 HG004037/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- R37 GM048405/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- T32 GM071340/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- T32 HG002295/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- U01 HG004258/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- U01 HG004270/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- U01 HG004279/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- U01 HG004695/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- U01HG004258/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- U01HG004270/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- U01HG004279/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- U01HG004695/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- U54 CA121852/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- U54 HG004570/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- U54 HG006991/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- U54CA121852/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- U54HG004570/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- Howard Hughes Medical Institute/ -- England -- Nature. 2014 Aug 28;512(7515):449-52. doi: 10.1038/nature13415.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉1] Center for Biomedical Informatics, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA [2] Division of Genetics, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA [3] [4] Victor Chang Cardiac Research Institute and The University of New South Wales, Sydney, New South Wales 2052, Australia (J.W.K.H.); Department of Biochemistry, University at Buffalo, Buffalo, New York 14203, USA (T.L.); Department of Molecular Biology and Lewis Sigler Institute for Integrative Genomics, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08540, USA (K.I., T.E.J.); Department of Human Genetics, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 06037, USA (J.D.L.); Division of Genomic Technologies, Center for Life Science Technologies, RIKEN, Yokohama 230-0045, Japan (A.M.); Department of Genetics, Department of Computer Science, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA (A.K.); Department of Biology, The University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, Alabama 35294, USA (N.C.R.). ; 1] Center for Biomedical Informatics, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA [2] Division of Genetics, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA [3]. ; 1] Center for Functional Cancer Epigenetics, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts 02215, USA [2] Department of Biostatistics and Computational Biology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Harvard School of Public Health, 450 Brookline Avenue, Boston, Massachusetts 02215, USA [3] [4] Victor Chang Cardiac Research Institute and The University of New South Wales, Sydney, New South Wales 2052, Australia (J.W.K.H.); Department of Biochemistry, University at Buffalo, Buffalo, New York 14203, USA (T.L.); Department of Molecular Biology and Lewis Sigler Institute for Integrative Genomics, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08540, USA (K.I., T.E.J.); Department of Human Genetics, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 06037, USA (J.D.L.); Division of Genomic Technologies, Center for Life Science Technologies, RIKEN, Yokohama 230-0045, Japan (A.M.); Department of Genetics, Department of Computer Science, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA (A.K.); Department of Biology, The University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, Alabama 35294, USA (N.C.R.). ; Center for Biomedical Informatics, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA. ; 1] Department of Biology and Carolina Center for Genome Sciences, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599, USA [2] Victor Chang Cardiac Research Institute and The University of New South Wales, Sydney, New South Wales 2052, Australia (J.W.K.H.); Department of Biochemistry, University at Buffalo, Buffalo, New York 14203, USA (T.L.); Department of Molecular Biology and Lewis Sigler Institute for Integrative Genomics, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08540, USA (K.I., T.E.J.); Department of Human Genetics, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 06037, USA (J.D.L.); Division of Genomic Technologies, Center for Life Science Technologies, RIKEN, Yokohama 230-0045, Japan (A.M.); Department of Genetics, Department of Computer Science, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA (A.K.); Department of Biology, The University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, Alabama 35294, USA (N.C.R.). ; 1] Department of Information and Computer Engineering, Ajou University, Suwon 443-749, Korea [2] Systems Biomedical Informatics Research Center, College of Medicine, Seoul National University, Seoul 110-799, Korea. ; 1] Department of Genome Dynamics, Life Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Lab, Berkeley, California 94720, USA [2] Department of Molecular and Cell Biology, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, California 94720, USA [3] Victor Chang Cardiac Research Institute and The University of New South Wales, Sydney, New South Wales 2052, Australia (J.W.K.H.); Department of Biochemistry, University at Buffalo, Buffalo, New York 14203, USA (T.L.); Department of Molecular Biology and Lewis Sigler Institute for Integrative Genomics, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08540, USA (K.I., T.E.J.); Department of Human Genetics, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 06037, USA (J.D.L.); Division of Genomic Technologies, Center for Life Science Technologies, RIKEN, Yokohama 230-0045, Japan (A.M.); Department of Genetics, Department of Computer Science, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA (A.K.); Department of Biology, The University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, Alabama 35294, USA (N.C.R.). ; 1] Center for Biomedical Informatics, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA [2] Division of Genetics, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA [3] Department of Molecular Biology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02114, USA. ; The Gurdon Institute and Department of Genetics, University of Cambridge, Tennis Court Road, Cambridge CB2 1QN, UK. ; 1] National Institute of General Medical Sciences, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland 20892, USA [2] National Human Genome Research Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland 20892, USA. ; Department of Biology, Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, Missouri 63130, USA. ; 1] Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139, USA [2] Broad Institute, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02141, USA [3] Victor Chang Cardiac Research Institute and The University of New South Wales, Sydney, New South Wales 2052, Australia (J.W.K.H.); Department of Biochemistry, University at Buffalo, Buffalo, New York 14203, USA (T.L.); Department of Molecular Biology and Lewis Sigler Institute for Integrative Genomics, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08540, USA (K.I., T.E.J.); Department of Human Genetics, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 06037, USA (J.D.L.); Division of Genomic Technologies, Center for Life Science Technologies, RIKEN, Yokohama 230-0045, Japan (A.M.); Department of Genetics, Department of Computer Science, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA (A.K.); Department of Biology, The University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, Alabama 35294, USA (N.C.R.). ; 1] Department of Biology, Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, Missouri 63130, USA [2] Victor Chang Cardiac Research Institute and The University of New South Wales, Sydney, New South Wales 2052, Australia (J.W.K.H.); Department of Biochemistry, University at Buffalo, Buffalo, New York 14203, USA (T.L.); Department of Molecular Biology and Lewis Sigler Institute for Integrative Genomics, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08540, USA (K.I., T.E.J.); Department of Human Genetics, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 06037, USA (J.D.L.); Division of Genomic Technologies, Center for Life Science Technologies, RIKEN, Yokohama 230-0045, Japan (A.M.); Department of Genetics, Department of Computer Science, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA (A.K.); Department of Biology, The University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, Alabama 35294, USA (N.C.R.). ; 1] Center for Biomedical Informatics, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA [2] Program in Bioinformatics, Boston University, Boston, Massachusetts 02215, USA. ; Department of Molecular, Cell and Developmental Biology, University of California Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, California 95064, USA. ; Department of Bioinformatics, School of Life Science and Technology, Tongji University, Shanghai 200092, China. ; 1] Division of Genetics, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA [2] Department of Genetics, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA. ; 1] Department of Molecular Biology and Biochemistry, Rutgers University, Piscataway, New Jersey 08854, USA [2] Food Science and Technology Department, Faculty of Agriculture, Alexandria University, 21545 El-Shatby, Alexandria, Egypt. ; Department of Pharmacology and Cancer Biology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710, USA. ; Department of Molecular Biology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02114, USA. ; Department of Biology and Carolina Center for Genome Sciences, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599, USA. ; 1] Center for Biomedical Informatics, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA [2] Harvard/MIT Division of Health Sciences and Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139, USA. ; Department of Anatomy Physiology and Cell Biology, University of California Davis, Davis, California 95616, USA. ; Broad Institute, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02141, USA. ; 1] Department of Biology and Carolina Center for Genome Sciences, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599, USA [2] Department of Biology, Center for Genomics and Systems Biology, New York University, New York, New York 10003, USA. ; National Human Genome Research Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland 20892, USA. ; 1] Center for Biomedical Informatics, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA [2] Broad Institute, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02141, USA. ; 1] Center for Biomedical Informatics, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA [2] Division of Genetics, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA. ; Department of Molecular and Cell Biology, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, California 94720, USA. ; Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario M6G 1L7, Canada. ; 1] Department of Molecular and Cell Biology, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, California 94720, USA [2] Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Chevy Chase, Maryland 20815, USA. ; 1] Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139, USA [2] Broad Institute, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02141, USA. ; 1] Department of Genome Dynamics, Life Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Lab, Berkeley, California 94720, USA [2] Department of Molecular and Cell Biology, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, California 94720, USA. ; Department of Molecular Biology, Cellular Biology and Biochemistry, Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island 02912, USA. ; Department of Computer Science and Engineering, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195, USA. ; 1] Department of Genome Dynamics, Life Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Lab, Berkeley, California 94720, USA [2] Department of Molecular and Cell Biology, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, California 94720, USA [3] Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Chevy Chase, Maryland 20815, USA. ; 1] Department of Molecular Biology and Biochemistry, Rutgers University, Piscataway, New Jersey 08854, USA [2] Department of Molecular Biology, Umea University, 901 87 Umea, Sweden. ; 1] Systems Biomedical Informatics Research Center, College of Medicine, Seoul National University, Seoul 110-799, Korea [2] Seoul National University Biomedical Informatics, Division of Biomedical Informatics, College of Medicine, Seoul National University, Seoul 110-799, Korea. ; 1] Broad Institute, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02141, USA [2] Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Chevy Chase, Maryland 20815, USA [3] Department of Pathology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02114, USA. ; Department of Molecular Biology and Biochemistry, Rutgers University, Piscataway, New Jersey 08854, USA. ; 1] Department of Computer Science and Engineering, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195, USA [2] Department of Genome Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195, USA. ; 1] Program in Bioinformatics, Boston University, Boston, Massachusetts 02215, USA [2] Department of Chemistry, Boston University, Boston, Massachusetts 02215, USA. ; 1] Center for Functional Cancer Epigenetics, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts 02215, USA [2] Department of Biostatistics and Computational Biology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Harvard School of Public Health, 450 Brookline Avenue, Boston, Massachusetts 02215, USA [3] Broad Institute, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02141, USA. ; 1] Center for Biomedical Informatics, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA [2] Division of Genetics, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA [3] Informatics Program, Children's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02215, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25164756" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Caenorhabditis elegans/*cytology/*genetics ; Cell Line ; Centromere/genetics/metabolism ; Chromatin/chemistry/*genetics/*metabolism ; Chromatin Assembly and Disassembly/genetics ; DNA Replication/genetics ; Drosophila melanogaster/*cytology/*genetics ; Enhancer Elements, Genetic/genetics ; Epigenesis, Genetic ; Heterochromatin/chemistry/genetics/metabolism ; Histones/chemistry/metabolism ; Humans ; Molecular Sequence Annotation ; Nuclear Lamina/metabolism ; Nucleosomes/chemistry/genetics/metabolism ; Promoter Regions, Genetic/genetics ; Species Specificity
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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