ALBERT

All Library Books, journals and Electronic Records Telegrafenberg

feed icon rss

Your email was sent successfully. Check your inbox.

An error occurred while sending the email. Please try again.

Proceed reservation?

Export
  • 1
    Publication Date: 2011-10-08
    Description: The exchange of the oocyte's genome with the genome of a somatic cell, followed by the derivation of pluripotent stem cells, could enable the generation of specific cells affected in degenerative human diseases. Such cells, carrying the patient's genome, might be useful for cell replacement. Here we report that the development of human oocytes after genome exchange arrests at late cleavage stages in association with transcriptional abnormalities. In contrast, if the oocyte genome is not removed and the somatic cell genome is merely added, the resultant triploid cells develop to the blastocyst stage. Stem cell lines derived from these blastocysts differentiate into cell types of all three germ layers, and a pluripotent gene expression program is established on the genome derived from the somatic cell. This result demonstrates the feasibility of reprogramming human cells using oocytes and identifies removal of the oocyte genome as the primary cause of developmental failure after genome exchange.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Noggle, Scott -- Fung, Ho-Lim -- Gore, Athurva -- Martinez, Hector -- Satriani, Kathleen Crumm -- Prosser, Robert -- Oum, Kiboong -- Paull, Daniel -- Druckenmiller, Sarah -- Freeby, Matthew -- Greenberg, Ellen -- Zhang, Kun -- Goland, Robin -- Sauer, Mark V -- Leibel, Rudolph L -- Egli, Dieter -- England -- Nature. 2011 Oct 5;478(7367):70-5. doi: 10.1038/nature10397.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉The New York Stem Cell Foundation Laboratory, New York, New York, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21979046" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Adult ; Blastocyst/cytology/metabolism ; Cell Differentiation ; *Cellular Reprogramming ; DNA Methylation ; Epigenesis, Genetic ; Female ; Gene Expression Profiling ; Gene Expression Regulation, Developmental ; Genome, Human/genetics ; Germ Layers/cytology/embryology/metabolism ; Humans ; Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells/*cytology/*metabolism ; Oocyte Donation ; Oocytes/*cytology/growth & development/*physiology ; Primary Cell Culture ; Transcription, Genetic ; Triploidy ; Young Adult
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 2
    Publication Date: 2012-10-19
    Description: Nuclear-architecture defects have been shown to correlate with the manifestation of a number of human diseases as well as ageing. It is therefore plausible that diseases whose manifestations correlate with ageing might be connected to the appearance of nuclear aberrations over time. We decided to evaluate nuclear organization in the context of ageing-associated disorders by focusing on a leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) dominant mutation (G2019S; glycine-to-serine substitution at amino acid 2019), which is associated with familial and sporadic Parkinson's disease as well as impairment of adult neurogenesis in mice. Here we report on the generation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) derived from Parkinson's disease patients and the implications of LRRK2(G2019S) mutation in human neural-stem-cell (NSC) populations. Mutant NSCs showed increased susceptibility to proteasomal stress as well as passage-dependent deficiencies in nuclear-envelope organization, clonal expansion and neuronal differentiation. Disease phenotypes were rescued by targeted correction of the LRRK2(G2019S) mutation with its wild-type counterpart in Parkinson's disease iPSCs and were recapitulated after targeted knock-in of the LRRK2(G2019S) mutation in human embryonic stem cells. Analysis of human brain tissue showed nuclear-envelope impairment in clinically diagnosed Parkinson's disease patients. Together, our results identify the nucleus as a previously unknown cellular organelle in Parkinson's disease pathology and may help to open new avenues for Parkinson's disease diagnoses as well as for the potential development of therapeutics targeting this fundamental cell structure.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3504651/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3504651/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Liu, Guang-Hui -- Qu, Jing -- Suzuki, Keiichiro -- Nivet, Emmanuel -- Li, Mo -- Montserrat, Nuria -- Yi, Fei -- Xu, Xiuling -- Ruiz, Sergio -- Zhang, Weiqi -- Wagner, Ulrich -- Kim, Audrey -- Ren, Bing -- Li, Ying -- Goebl, April -- Kim, Jessica -- Soligalla, Rupa Devi -- Dubova, Ilir -- Thompson, James -- Yates, John 3rd -- Esteban, Concepcion Rodriguez -- Sancho-Martinez, Ignacio -- Izpisua Belmonte, Juan Carlos -- ES017166/ES/NIEHS NIH HHS/ -- GTB07001/Telethon/Italy -- P41 RR011823/RR/NCRR NIH HHS/ -- U01 ES017166/ES/NIEHS NIH HHS/ -- England -- Nature. 2012 Nov 22;491(7425):603-7. doi: 10.1038/nature11557. Epub 2012 Oct 17.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉National Laboratory of Biomacromolecules, Institute of Biophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101, China. ghliu@ibp.ac.cn〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23075850" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Apoptosis ; Cell Differentiation ; Cell Division ; Cell Line ; Clone Cells/metabolism/pathology ; Embryonic Stem Cells/metabolism/pathology ; Gene Knock-In Techniques ; Humans ; Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells/metabolism/pathology ; Mutant Proteins/genetics/*metabolism ; Mutation ; Neural Stem Cells/metabolism/*pathology ; Nuclear Envelope/genetics/pathology ; Parkinson Disease/*pathology ; Proteasome Endopeptidase Complex/metabolism ; Protein-Serine-Threonine Kinases/*genetics/*metabolism ; Stress, Physiological
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 3
    Publication Date: 2012-06-09
    Description: Localized ecological systems are known to shift abruptly and irreversibly from one state to another when they are forced across critical thresholds. Here we review evidence that the global ecosystem as a whole can react in the same way and is approaching a planetary-scale critical transition as a result of human influence. The plausibility of a planetary-scale 'tipping point' highlights the need to improve biological forecasting by detecting early warning signs of critical transitions on global as well as local scales, and by detecting feedbacks that promote such transitions. It is also necessary to address root causes of how humans are forcing biological changes.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Barnosky, Anthony D -- Hadly, Elizabeth A -- Bascompte, Jordi -- Berlow, Eric L -- Brown, James H -- Fortelius, Mikael -- Getz, Wayne M -- Harte, John -- Hastings, Alan -- Marquet, Pablo A -- Martinez, Neo D -- Mooers, Arne -- Roopnarine, Peter -- Vermeij, Geerat -- Williams, John W -- Gillespie, Rosemary -- Kitzes, Justin -- Marshall, Charles -- Matzke, Nicholas -- Mindell, David P -- Revilla, Eloy -- Smith, Adam B -- R01 GM069801/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- England -- Nature. 2012 Jun 6;486(7401):52-8. doi: 10.1038/nature11018.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Integrative Biology, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720, USA. barnosky@berkeley.edu〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22678279" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Climate Change/*statistics & numerical data ; *Earth (Planet) ; *Ecosystem ; Environmental Monitoring ; Forecasting ; Human Activities ; Humans ; *Models, Theoretical
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 4
    Publication Date: 2013-01-18
    Description: 〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Sancho-Martinez, Ignacio -- Izpisua Belmonte, Juan Carlos -- England -- Nature. 2013 Jan 17;493(7432):310-1. doi: 10.1038/493310b.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23325209" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: *Cellular Reprogramming ; Humans ; Single-Cell Analysis ; Stem Cells/*cytology/*metabolism
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 5
    Publication Date: 2013-07-05
    Description: Most great ape genetic variation remains uncharacterized; however, its study is critical for understanding population history, recombination, selection and susceptibility to disease. Here we sequence to high coverage a total of 79 wild- and captive-born individuals representing all six great ape species and seven subspecies and report 88.8 million single nucleotide polymorphisms. Our analysis provides support for genetically distinct populations within each species, signals of gene flow, and the split of common chimpanzees into two distinct groups: Nigeria-Cameroon/western and central/eastern populations. We find extensive inbreeding in almost all wild populations, with eastern gorillas being the most extreme. Inferred effective population sizes have varied radically over time in different lineages and this appears to have a profound effect on the genetic diversity at, or close to, genes in almost all species. We discover and assign 1,982 loss-of-function variants throughout the human and great ape lineages, determining that the rate of gene loss has not been different in the human branch compared to other internal branches in the great ape phylogeny. This comprehensive catalogue of great ape genome diversity provides a framework for understanding evolution and a resource for more effective management of wild and captive great ape populations.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3822165/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3822165/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Prado-Martinez, Javier -- Sudmant, Peter H -- Kidd, Jeffrey M -- Li, Heng -- Kelley, Joanna L -- Lorente-Galdos, Belen -- Veeramah, Krishna R -- Woerner, August E -- O'Connor, Timothy D -- Santpere, Gabriel -- Cagan, Alexander -- Theunert, Christoph -- Casals, Ferran -- Laayouni, Hafid -- Munch, Kasper -- Hobolth, Asger -- Halager, Anders E -- Malig, Maika -- Hernandez-Rodriguez, Jessica -- Hernando-Herraez, Irene -- Prufer, Kay -- Pybus, Marc -- Johnstone, Laurel -- Lachmann, Michael -- Alkan, Can -- Twigg, Dorina -- Petit, Natalia -- Baker, Carl -- Hormozdiari, Fereydoun -- Fernandez-Callejo, Marcos -- Dabad, Marc -- Wilson, Michael L -- Stevison, Laurie -- Camprubi, Cristina -- Carvalho, Tiago -- Ruiz-Herrera, Aurora -- Vives, Laura -- Mele, Marta -- Abello, Teresa -- Kondova, Ivanela -- Bontrop, Ronald E -- Pusey, Anne -- Lankester, Felix -- Kiyang, John A -- Bergl, Richard A -- Lonsdorf, Elizabeth -- Myers, Simon -- Ventura, Mario -- Gagneux, Pascal -- Comas, David -- Siegismund, Hans -- Blanc, Julie -- Agueda-Calpena, Lidia -- Gut, Marta -- Fulton, Lucinda -- Tishkoff, Sarah A -- Mullikin, James C -- Wilson, Richard K -- Gut, Ivo G -- Gonder, Mary Katherine -- Ryder, Oliver A -- Hahn, Beatrice H -- Navarro, Arcadi -- Akey, Joshua M -- Bertranpetit, Jaume -- Reich, David -- Mailund, Thomas -- Schierup, Mikkel H -- Hvilsom, Christina -- Andres, Aida M -- Wall, Jeffrey D -- Bustamante, Carlos D -- Hammer, Michael F -- Eichler, Evan E -- Marques-Bonet, Tomas -- 090532/Wellcome Trust/United Kingdom -- 260372/European Research Council/International -- DP1 ES022577/ES/NIEHS NIH HHS/ -- DP1ES022577-04/DP/NCCDPHP CDC HHS/ -- GM100233/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- HG002385/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- R01 GM095882/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- R01 GM100233/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- R01 HG002385/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- R01_HG005226/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- Howard Hughes Medical Institute/ -- England -- Nature. 2013 Jul 25;499(7459):471-5. doi: 10.1038/nature12228. Epub 2013 Jul 3.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Institut de Biologia Evolutiva, CSIC-Universitat Pompeu Fabra, PRBB, Doctor Aiguader 88, Barcelona, Catalonia 08003, Spain.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23823723" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Africa ; Animals ; Animals, Wild/genetics ; Animals, Zoo/genetics ; Asia, Southeastern ; Evolution, Molecular ; Gene Flow/genetics ; *Genetic Variation ; Genetics, Population ; Genome/genetics ; Gorilla gorilla/classification/genetics ; Hominidae/classification/*genetics ; Humans ; Inbreeding ; Pan paniscus/classification/genetics ; Pan troglodytes/classification/genetics ; Phylogeny ; Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide/genetics ; Population Density
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 6
    Publication Date: 2014-05-30
    Description: RNA ligases have essential roles in many cellular processes in eukaryotes, archaea and bacteria, including in RNA repair and stress-induced splicing of messenger RNA. In archaea and eukaryotes, RNA ligases also have a role in transfer RNA splicing to generate functional tRNAs required for protein synthesis. We recently identified the human tRNA splicing ligase, a multimeric protein complex with RTCB (also known as HSPC117, C22orf28, FAAP and D10Wsu52e) as the essential subunit. The functions of the additional complex components ASW (also known as C2orf49), CGI-99 (also known as C14orf166), FAM98B and the DEAD-box helicase DDX1 in the context of RNA ligation have remained unclear. Taking advantage of clusters of eukaryotic orthologous groups, here we find that archease (ARCH; also known as ZBTB8OS), a protein of unknown function, is required for full activity of the human tRNA ligase complex and, in cooperation with DDX1, facilitates the formation of an RTCB-guanylate intermediate central to mammalian RNA ligation. Our findings define a role for DDX1 in the context of the human tRNA ligase complex and suggest that the widespread co-occurrence of archease and RtcB proteins implies evolutionary conservation of their functional interplay.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4417724/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4417724/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Popow, Johannes -- Jurkin, Jennifer -- Schleiffer, Alexander -- Martinez, Javier -- P 24687/Austrian Science Fund FWF/Austria -- England -- Nature. 2014 Jul 3;511(7507):104-7. doi: 10.1038/nature13284. Epub 2014 May 25.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉1] Institute of Molecular Biotechnology of the Austrian Academy of Sciences (IMBA), A-1030 Vienna, Austria [2] European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), 69117 Heidelberg, Germany. ; Institute of Molecular Biotechnology of the Austrian Academy of Sciences (IMBA), A-1030 Vienna, Austria. ; IMP/IMBA Bioinformatics Core Facility, Research Institute of Molecular Pathology (IMP), A-1030 Vienna, Austria.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24870230" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Carrier Proteins/*metabolism ; Catalytic Domain ; Cell Survival ; Conserved Sequence ; DEAD-box RNA Helicases/*metabolism ; Evolution, Molecular ; Humans ; Multienzyme Complexes/chemistry/isolation & purification/*metabolism ; Proteins ; RNA Ligase (ATP)/*chemistry/isolation & purification/*metabolism ; *RNA Splicing ; RNA, Transfer/genetics/*metabolism
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 7
    Publication Date: 2014-08-01
    Description: Microorganisms evolve via a range of mechanisms that may include or involve sexual/parasexual reproduction, mutators, aneuploidy, Hsp90 and even prions. Mechanisms that may seem detrimental can be repurposed to generate diversity. Here we show that the human fungal pathogen Mucor circinelloides develops spontaneous resistance to the antifungal drug FK506 (tacrolimus) via two distinct mechanisms. One involves Mendelian mutations that confer stable drug resistance; the other occurs via an epigenetic RNA interference (RNAi)-mediated pathway resulting in unstable drug resistance. The peptidylprolyl isomerase FKBP12 interacts with FK506 forming a complex that inhibits the protein phosphatase calcineurin. Calcineurin inhibition by FK506 blocks M. circinelloides transition to hyphae and enforces yeast growth. Mutations in the fkbA gene encoding FKBP12 or the calcineurin cnbR or cnaA genes confer FK506 resistance and restore hyphal growth. In parallel, RNAi is spontaneously triggered to silence the fkbA gene, giving rise to drug-resistant epimutants. FK506-resistant epimutants readily reverted to the drug-sensitive wild-type phenotype when grown without exposure to the drug. The establishment of these epimutants is accompanied by generation of abundant fkbA small RNAs and requires the RNAi pathway as well as other factors that constrain or reverse the epimutant state. Silencing involves the generation of a double-stranded RNA trigger intermediate using the fkbA mature mRNA as a template to produce antisense fkbA RNA. This study uncovers a novel epigenetic RNAi-based epimutation mechanism controlling phenotypic plasticity, with possible implications for antimicrobial drug resistance and RNAi-regulatory mechanisms in fungi and other eukaryotes.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4177005/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4177005/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Calo, Silvia -- Shertz-Wall, Cecelia -- Lee, Soo Chan -- Bastidas, Robert J -- Nicolas, Francisco E -- Granek, Joshua A -- Mieczkowski, Piotr -- Torres-Martinez, Santiago -- Ruiz-Vazquez, Rosa M -- Cardenas, Maria E -- Heitman, Joseph -- R01 AI039115/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- R01 AI50438-10/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- R01 CA154499/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01 CA154499-04/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R37 AI039115/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- R37 AI39115-17/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- England -- Nature. 2014 Sep 25;513(7519):555-8. doi: 10.1038/nature13575. Epub 2014 Jul 27.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Molecular Genetics and Microbiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710, USA. ; 1] Regional Campus of International Excellence "Campus Mare Nostrum", Murcia 30100, Spain [2] Department of Genetics and Microbiology, Faculty of Biology, University of Murcia, Murcia 30100, Spain. ; 1] Department of Molecular Genetics and Microbiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710, USA [2] Department of Biostatistics and Bioinformatics, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710, USA [3] Duke Center for the Genomics of Microbial Systems, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710, USA. ; High-Throughput Sequencing Facility, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599, USA. ; Department of Genetics and Microbiology, Faculty of Biology, University of Murcia, Murcia 30100, Spain.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25079329" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Calcineurin/genetics/metabolism ; Calcineurin Inhibitors ; Drug Resistance, Fungal/*genetics ; Epigenesis, Genetic/*genetics ; Humans ; Hyphae/drug effects/genetics/growth & development ; Molecular Sequence Data ; Mucor/*drug effects/*genetics/growth & development ; Mucormycosis/drug therapy/microbiology ; Mutation/*genetics ; Phenotype ; *RNA Interference ; Tacrolimus/metabolism/*pharmacology ; Tacrolimus Binding Protein 1A/deficiency/genetics/metabolism
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 8
    facet.materialart.
    Unknown
    American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS)
    Publication Date: 2012-11-20
    Description: 〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3621126/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3621126/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Martinez, Gustavo J -- Rao, Anjana -- R01 CA042471/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01 CA42471/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2012 Nov 16;338(6109):891-2. doi: 10.1126/science.1231310.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉La Jolla Institute for Allergy and Immunology, La Jolla, CA 92037, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23161983" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Humans ; Immunomodulation/*genetics ; Interferon Regulatory Factors/*metabolism ; *Regulatory Elements, Transcriptional ; Th17 Cells/*immunology ; Transcription Factor AP-1/*metabolism ; *Transcriptional Activation
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 9
    Publication Date: 2014-10-04
    Description: The thermal stability of proteins can be used to assess ligand binding in living cells. We have generalized this concept by determining the thermal profiles of more than 7000 proteins in human cells by means of mass spectrometry. Monitoring the effects of small-molecule ligands on the profiles delineated more than 50 targets for the kinase inhibitor staurosporine. We identified the heme biosynthesis enzyme ferrochelatase as a target of kinase inhibitors and suggest that its inhibition causes the phototoxicity observed with vemurafenib and alectinib. Thermal shifts were also observed for downstream effectors of drug treatment. In live cells, dasatinib induced shifts in BCR-ABL pathway proteins, including CRK/CRKL. Thermal proteome profiling provides an unbiased measure of drug-target engagement and facilitates identification of markers for drug efficacy and toxicity.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Savitski, Mikhail M -- Reinhard, Friedrich B M -- Franken, Holger -- Werner, Thilo -- Savitski, Maria Falth -- Eberhard, Dirk -- Martinez Molina, Daniel -- Jafari, Rozbeh -- Dovega, Rebecca Bakszt -- Klaeger, Susan -- Kuster, Bernhard -- Nordlund, Par -- Bantscheff, Marcus -- Drewes, Gerard -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2014 Oct 3;346(6205):1255784. doi: 10.1126/science.1255784. Epub 2014 Oct 2.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Cellzome GmbH, Molecular Discovery Research, GlaxoSmithKline, Meyerhofstrasse 1, Heidelberg, Germany. mikhail.m.savitski@gsk.com marcus.x.bantscheff@gsk.com gerard.c.drewes@gsk.com. ; Cellzome GmbH, Molecular Discovery Research, GlaxoSmithKline, Meyerhofstrasse 1, Heidelberg, Germany. ; Division of Biophysics, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. ; Department of Proteomics and Bioanalytics, Technische Universitat Munchen, Emil Erlenmeyer Forum 5, Freising, Germany. German Cancer Consortium, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg, Germany. ; Division of Biophysics, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. Centre for Biomedical Structural Biology, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25278616" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Adenosine Triphosphatases/metabolism ; Antineoplastic Agents/*pharmacology ; Hot Temperature ; Humans ; K562 Cells ; Ligands ; Protein Binding ; Protein Denaturation ; Protein Stability ; Proteome/*drug effects ; Proteomics/*methods
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 10
    Publication Date: 2014-01-28
    Description: Ancient genomic sequences have started to reveal the origin and the demographic impact of farmers from the Neolithic period spreading into Europe. The adoption of farming, stock breeding and sedentary societies during the Neolithic may have resulted in adaptive changes in genes associated with immunity and diet. However, the limited data available from earlier hunter-gatherers preclude an understanding of the selective processes associated with this crucial transition to agriculture in recent human evolution. Here we sequence an approximately 7,000-year-old Mesolithic skeleton discovered at the La Brana-Arintero site in Leon, Spain, to retrieve a complete pre-agricultural European human genome. Analysis of this genome in the context of other ancient samples suggests the existence of a common ancient genomic signature across western and central Eurasia from the Upper Paleolithic to the Mesolithic. The La Brana individual carries ancestral alleles in several skin pigmentation genes, suggesting that the light skin of modern Europeans was not yet ubiquitous in Mesolithic times. Moreover, we provide evidence that a significant number of derived, putatively adaptive variants associated with pathogen resistance in modern Europeans were already present in this hunter-gatherer.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4269527/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4269527/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Olalde, Inigo -- Allentoft, Morten E -- Sanchez-Quinto, Federico -- Santpere, Gabriel -- Chiang, Charleston W K -- DeGiorgio, Michael -- Prado-Martinez, Javier -- Rodriguez, Juan Antonio -- Rasmussen, Simon -- Quilez, Javier -- Ramirez, Oscar -- Marigorta, Urko M -- Fernandez-Callejo, Marcos -- Prada, Maria Encina -- Encinas, Julio Manuel Vidal -- Nielsen, Rasmus -- Netea, Mihai G -- Novembre, John -- Sturm, Richard A -- Sabeti, Pardis -- Marques-Bonet, Tomas -- Navarro, Arcadi -- Willerslev, Eske -- Lalueza-Fox, Carles -- F32 GM106656/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- F32GM106656/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- R01 HG007089/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- R01-HG007089/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- England -- Nature. 2014 Mar 13;507(7491):225-8. doi: 10.1038/nature12960. Epub 2014 Jan 26.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉1] Institut de Biologia Evolutiva, CSIC-UPF, Barcelona 08003, Spain [2]. ; 1] Centre for GeoGenetics, Natural History Museum of Denmark, University of Copenhagen, DK-1350 Copenhagen K, Denmark [2]. ; Institut de Biologia Evolutiva, CSIC-UPF, Barcelona 08003, Spain. ; Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095, USA. ; 1] Department of Integrative Biology, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720, USA [2] Department of Biology, Pennsylvania State University, 502 Wartik Laboratory, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802, USA. ; Center for Biological Sequence Analysis, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800 Kongens Lyngby, Denmark. ; I.E.S.O. 'Los Salados', Junta de Castilla y Leon, E-49600 Benavente, Spain. ; Junta de Castilla y Leon, Servicio de Cultura de Leon, E-24071 Leon, Spain. ; Center for Theoretical Evolutionary Genomics, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720, USA. ; Department of Medicine and Nijmegen Institute for Infection, Inflammation and Immunity, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, 6500 Nijmegen, The Netherlands. ; Department of Human Genetics, University of Chicago, Illinois 60637, USA. ; Institute for Molecular Bioscience, Melanogenix Group, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland 4072, Australia. ; 1] Center for Systems Biology, Department of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138, USA [2] Broad Institute of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Harvard, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02142, USA. ; 1] Institut de Biologia Evolutiva, CSIC-UPF, Barcelona 08003, Spain [2] Institucio Catalana de Recerca i Estudis Avancats (ICREA), 08010 Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain. ; 1] Institut de Biologia Evolutiva, CSIC-UPF, Barcelona 08003, Spain [2] Institucio Catalana de Recerca i Estudis Avancats (ICREA), 08010 Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain [3] Centre de Regulacio Genomica (CRG), Barcelona 08003, Catalonia, Spain [4] National Institute for Bioinformatics (INB), Barcelona 08003, Catalonia, Spain. ; Centre for GeoGenetics, Natural History Museum of Denmark, University of Copenhagen, DK-1350 Copenhagen K, Denmark.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24463515" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Agriculture/history ; *Alleles ; Biological Evolution ; Caves ; European Continental Ancestry Group/*genetics ; Eye Color/genetics ; *Fossils ; Genome, Human/genetics ; Genomics ; History, Ancient ; Humans ; Immunity/*genetics ; Lactose Intolerance/genetics ; Male ; Pigmentation/*genetics ; Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide/genetics ; Principal Component Analysis ; Skeleton ; Skin Pigmentation/genetics ; Spain/ethnology
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
Close ⊗
This website uses cookies and the analysis tool Matomo. More information can be found here...