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  • 1
    Publication Date: 2007-04-28
    Description: New strategies for prevention and treatment of type 2 diabetes (T2D) require improved insight into disease etiology. We analyzed 386,731 common single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 1464 patients with T2D and 1467 matched controls, each characterized for measures of glucose metabolism, lipids, obesity, and blood pressure. With collaborators (FUSION and WTCCC/UKT2D), we identified and confirmed three loci associated with T2D-in a noncoding region near CDKN2A and CDKN2B, in an intron of IGF2BP2, and an intron of CDKAL1-and replicated associations near HHEX and in SLC30A8 found by a recent whole-genome association study. We identified and confirmed association of a SNP in an intron of glucokinase regulatory protein (GCKR) with serum triglycerides. The discovery of associated variants in unsuspected genes and outside coding regions illustrates the ability of genome-wide association studies to provide potentially important clues to the pathogenesis of common diseases.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Diabetes Genetics Initiative of Broad Institute of Harvard and MIT, Lund University, and Novartis Institutes of BioMedical Research -- Saxena, Richa -- Voight, Benjamin F -- Lyssenko, Valeriya -- Burtt, Noel P -- de Bakker, Paul I W -- Chen, Hong -- Roix, Jeffrey J -- Kathiresan, Sekar -- Hirschhorn, Joel N -- Daly, Mark J -- Hughes, Thomas E -- Groop, Leif -- Altshuler, David -- Almgren, Peter -- Florez, Jose C -- Meyer, Joanne -- Ardlie, Kristin -- Bengtsson Bostrom, Kristina -- Isomaa, Bo -- Lettre, Guillaume -- Lindblad, Ulf -- Lyon, Helen N -- Melander, Olle -- Newton-Cheh, Christopher -- Nilsson, Peter -- Orho-Melander, Marju -- Rastam, Lennart -- Speliotes, Elizabeth K -- Taskinen, Marja-Riitta -- Tuomi, Tiinamaija -- Guiducci, Candace -- Berglund, Anna -- Carlson, Joyce -- Gianniny, Lauren -- Hackett, Rachel -- Hall, Liselotte -- Holmkvist, Johan -- Laurila, Esa -- Sjogren, Marketa -- Sterner, Maria -- Surti, Aarti -- Svensson, Margareta -- Svensson, Malin -- Tewhey, Ryan -- Blumenstiel, Brendan -- Parkin, Melissa -- Defelice, Matthew -- Barry, Rachel -- Brodeur, Wendy -- Camarata, Jody -- Chia, Nancy -- Fava, Mary -- Gibbons, John -- Handsaker, Bob -- Healy, Claire -- Nguyen, Kieu -- Gates, Casey -- Sougnez, Carrie -- Gage, Diane -- Nizzari, Marcia -- Gabriel, Stacey B -- Chirn, Gung-Wei -- Ma, Qicheng -- Parikh, Hemang -- Richardson, Delwood -- Ricke, Darrell -- Purcell, Shaun -- F32 DK079466/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- F32 DK079466-01/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- K23 DK067288/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- K23 DK080145/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- K23 DK080145-01/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- K23 DK65978-04/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- K23-HL083102/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS/ -- U01 HG004171/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2007 Jun 1;316(5829):1331-6. Epub 2007 Apr 26.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Broad Institute of Harvard and Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA 02142, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17463246" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Adaptor Proteins, Signal Transducing/genetics ; Aged ; Alleles ; Blood Glucose/analysis ; Case-Control Studies ; Chromosome Mapping ; Chromosomes, Human, Pair 9/genetics ; Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/*genetics ; Female ; Genetic Markers ; *Genetic Predisposition to Disease ; *Genome, Human ; Genotype ; Haplotypes ; Humans ; Insulin Resistance/genetics ; Insulin-Like Growth Factor Binding Proteins/genetics ; Introns ; Male ; Meta-Analysis as Topic ; Middle Aged ; *Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide ; Quantitative Trait, Heritable ; Triglycerides/*blood
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 2
    Publication Date: 1994-07-29
    Description: Rasmussen's encephalitis is a progressive childhood disease of unknown cause characterized by severe epilepsy, hemiplegia, dementia, and inflammation of the brain. During efforts to raise antibodies to recombinant glutamate receptors (GluRs), behaviors typical of seizures and histopathologic features mimicking Rasmussen's encephalitis were found in two rabbits immunized with GluR3 protein. A correlation was found between the presence of Rasmussen's encephalitis and serum antibodies to GluR3 detected by protein immunoblot analysis and by immunoreactivity to transfected cells expressing GluR3. Repeated plasma exchanges in one seriously ill child transiently reduced serum titers of GluR3 antibodies, decreased seizure frequency, and improved neurologic function. Thus, GluR3 is an autoantigen in Rasmussen's encephalitis, and an autoimmune process may underlie this disease.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Rogers, S W -- Andrews, P I -- Gahring, L C -- Whisenand, T -- Cauley, K -- Crain, B -- Hughes, T E -- Heinemann, S F -- McNamara, J O -- NS17771/NS/NINDS NIH HHS/ -- NS28709/NS/NINDS NIH HHS/ -- NS30990R29/NS/NINDS NIH HHS/ -- etc. -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 1994 Jul 29;265(5172):648-51.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Salt Lake City Geriatric Research Education and Clinical Center, Veterans Affairs Medical Center, UT.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8036512" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Antibody Specificity ; Autoantibodies/blood/*immunology ; Brain/pathology ; Cell Line ; Child ; Disease Models, Animal ; Encephalitis/complications/*immunology/pathology/therapy ; Female ; Humans ; Male ; Plasma Exchange ; Rabbits ; Receptors, Glutamate/*immunology ; Recombinant Fusion Proteins/immunology ; Seizures/etiology/immunology
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
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    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 3
    Publication Date: 2000-02-26
    Description: Most types of antibiotic resistance impose a biological cost on bacterial fitness. These costs can be compensated, usually without loss of resistance, by second-site mutations during the evolution of the resistant bacteria in an experimental host or in a laboratory medium. Different fitness-compensating mutations were selected depending on whether the bacteria evolved through serial passage in mice or in a laboratory medium. This difference in mutation spectra was caused by either a growth condition-specific formation or selection of the compensated mutants. These results suggest that bacterial evolution to reduce the costs of antibiotic resistance can take different trajectories within and outside a host.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Bjorkman, J -- Nagaev, I -- Berg, O G -- Hughes, D -- Andersson, D I -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2000 Feb 25;287(5457):1479-82.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Bacteriology, Swedish Institute for Infectious Disease Control, S-171 82 Solna, Sweden.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10688795" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Adaptation, Physiological ; Animals ; Anti-Bacterial Agents/*pharmacology ; *Antiporters ; Carrier Proteins/genetics ; Culture Media ; Drug Resistance, Microbial/*genetics ; Escherichia coli Proteins ; Evolution, Molecular ; Female ; Fusidic Acid/pharmacology ; Membrane Proteins/genetics ; Mice ; Mice, Inbred BALB C ; *Mutation ; Peptide Elongation Factor G/genetics ; Ribosomal Proteins/genetics ; Salmonella typhimurium/*drug effects/*genetics/growth & development/metabolism ; Selection, Genetic ; Serial Passage ; Streptomycin/pharmacology ; Suppression, Genetic
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  • 4
    Publication Date: 2006-09-02
    Description: Through the adoptive transfer of lymphocytes after host immunodepletion, it is possible to mediate objective cancer regression in human patients with metastatic melanoma. However, the generation of tumor-specific T cells in this mode of immunotherapy is often limiting. Here we report the ability to specifically confer tumor recognition by autologous lymphocytes from peripheral blood by using a retrovirus that encodes a T cell receptor. Adoptive transfer of these transduced cells in 15 patients resulted in durable engraftment at levels exceeding 10% of peripheral blood lymphocytes for at least 2 months after the infusion. We observed high sustained levels of circulating, engineered cells at 1 year after infusion in two patients who both demonstrated objective regression of metastatic melanoma lesions. This study suggests the therapeutic potential of genetically engineered cells for the biologic therapy of cancer.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2267026/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2267026/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Morgan, Richard A -- Dudley, Mark E -- Wunderlich, John R -- Hughes, Marybeth S -- Yang, James C -- Sherry, Richard M -- Royal, Richard E -- Topalian, Suzanne L -- Kammula, Udai S -- Restifo, Nicholas P -- Zheng, Zhili -- Nahvi, Azam -- de Vries, Christiaan R -- Rogers-Freezer, Linda J -- Mavroukakis, Sharon A -- Rosenberg, Steven A -- Z01 BC010763-01/Intramural NIH HHS/ -- Z01 SC003811-32/Intramural NIH HHS/ -- Z99 CA999999/Intramural NIH HHS/ -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2006 Oct 6;314(5796):126-9. Epub 2006 Aug 31.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Surgery Branch, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, 10 Center Drive, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16946036" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: *Adoptive Transfer ; Adult ; Antigens, Neoplasm/*immunology ; CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes/*immunology ; Cancer Vaccines/therapeutic use ; Cells, Cultured ; Electroporation ; Female ; Genetic Engineering ; *Genetic Therapy ; HLA-A Antigens/immunology ; HLA-A2 Antigen ; Humans ; Interleukin-2/immunology/therapeutic use ; MART-1 Antigen ; Male ; Melanoma/immunology/secondary/*therapy ; Middle Aged ; Neoplasm Proteins/*immunology ; Receptors, Antigen, T-Cell, alpha-beta/*genetics/*immunology ; Transduction, Genetic ; Transgenes
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    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 5
    Publication Date: 2008-05-31
    Description: Close relatedness has long been considered crucial to the evolution of eusociality. However, it has recently been suggested that close relatedness may be a consequence, rather than a cause, of eusociality. We tested this idea with a comparative analysis of female mating frequencies in 267 species of eusocial bees, wasps, and ants. We found that mating with a single male, which maximizes relatedness, is ancestral for all eight independent eusocial lineages that we investigated. Mating with multiple males is always derived. Furthermore, we found that high polyandry (〉2 effective mates) occurs only in lineages whose workers have lost reproductive totipotency. These results provide the first evidence that monogamy was critical in the evolution of eusociality, strongly supporting the prediction of inclusive fitness theory.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Hughes, William O H -- Oldroyd, Benjamin P -- Beekman, Madeleine -- Ratnieks, Francis L W -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2008 May 30;320(5880):1213-6. doi: 10.1126/science.1156108.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Institute of Integrative and Comparative Biology, University of Leeds, Leeds, LS2 9JT, UK. w.o.h.hughes@leeds.ac.uk〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18511689" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Altruism ; Animals ; Ants ; Bees ; *Biological Evolution ; Female ; Male ; Phylogeny ; *Sexual Behavior, Animal ; *Social Behavior ; Sociobiology ; Wasps
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  • 6
    Publication Date: 2013-05-25
    Description: CD8(+) T cell responses focus on a small fraction of pathogen- or vaccine-encoded peptides, and for some pathogens, these restricted recognition hierarchies limit the effectiveness of antipathogen immunity. We found that simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) protein-expressing rhesus cytomegalovirus (RhCMV) vectors elicit SIV-specific CD8(+) T cells that recognize unusual, diverse, and highly promiscuous epitopes, including dominant responses to epitopes restricted by class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules. Induction of canonical SIV epitope-specific CD8(+) T cell responses is suppressed by the RhCMV-encoded Rh189 gene (corresponding to human CMV US11), and the promiscuous MHC class I- and class II-restricted CD8(+) T cell responses occur only in the absence of the Rh157.5, Rh157.4, and Rh157.6 (human CMV UL128, UL130, and UL131) genes. Thus, CMV vectors can be genetically programmed to achieve distinct patterns of CD8(+) T cell epitope recognition.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3816976/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3816976/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Hansen, Scott G -- Sacha, Jonah B -- Hughes, Colette M -- Ford, Julia C -- Burwitz, Benjamin J -- Scholz, Isabel -- Gilbride, Roxanne M -- Lewis, Matthew S -- Gilliam, Awbrey N -- Ventura, Abigail B -- Malouli, Daniel -- Xu, Guangwu -- Richards, Rebecca -- Whizin, Nathan -- Reed, Jason S -- Hammond, Katherine B -- Fischer, Miranda -- Turner, John M -- Legasse, Alfred W -- Axthelm, Michael K -- Edlefsen, Paul T -- Nelson, Jay A -- Lifson, Jeffrey D -- Fruh, Klaus -- Picker, Louis J -- P01 AI094417/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- P51 OD 011092/OD/NIH HHS/ -- R01 AI059457/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- R01 AI060392/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- U24 OD010850/OD/NIH HHS/ -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2013 May 24;340(6135):1237874. doi: 10.1126/science.1237874.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Vaccine and Gene Therapy Institute and Oregon National Primate Research Center, Oregon Health & Science University, Beaverton, OR 97006, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23704576" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes/*immunology ; Cytokines/immunology ; Cytomegalovirus/genetics/*immunology ; Epitopes, T-Lymphocyte/*immunology ; Female ; Genetic Vectors/genetics/*immunology ; Histocompatibility Antigens Class II/immunology ; Humans ; Macaca mulatta ; Male ; Membrane Glycoproteins/genetics ; SAIDS Vaccines/administration & dosage/*immunology ; Viral Envelope Proteins/genetics
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  • 7
    Publication Date: 2014-09-13
    Description: Cytotoxic T lymphocyte antigen-4 (CTLA-4) is an inhibitory receptor found on immune cells. The consequences of mutations in CTLA4 in humans are unknown. We identified germline heterozygous mutations in CTLA4 in subjects with severe immune dysregulation from four unrelated families. Whereas Ctla4 heterozygous mice have no obvious phenotype, human CTLA4 haploinsufficiency caused dysregulation of FoxP3(+) regulatory T (Treg) cells, hyperactivation of effector T cells, and lymphocytic infiltration of target organs. Patients also exhibited progressive loss of circulating B cells, associated with an increase of predominantly autoreactive CD21(lo) B cells and accumulation of B cells in nonlymphoid organs. Inherited human CTLA4 haploinsufficiency demonstrates a critical quantitative role for CTLA-4 in governing T and B lymphocyte homeostasis.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4371526/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4371526/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Kuehn, Hye Sun -- Ouyang, Weiming -- Lo, Bernice -- Deenick, Elissa K -- Niemela, Julie E -- Avery, Danielle T -- Schickel, Jean-Nicolas -- Tran, Dat Q -- Stoddard, Jennifer -- Zhang, Yu -- Frucht, David M -- Dumitriu, Bogdan -- Scheinberg, Phillip -- Folio, Les R -- Frein, Cathleen A -- Price, Susan -- Koh, Christopher -- Heller, Theo -- Seroogy, Christine M -- Huttenlocher, Anna -- Rao, V Koneti -- Su, Helen C -- Kleiner, David -- Notarangelo, Luigi D -- Rampertaap, Yajesh -- Olivier, Kenneth N -- McElwee, Joshua -- Hughes, Jason -- Pittaluga, Stefania -- Oliveira, Joao B -- Meffre, Eric -- Fleisher, Thomas A -- Holland, Steven M -- Lenardo, Michael J -- Tangye, Stuart G -- Uzel, Gulbu -- 5R01HL113304-01/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS/ -- AI061093/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- AI071087/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- AI095848/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- HHSN261200800001E/PHS HHS/ -- P01 AI061093/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- R01 AI071087/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- R01 HL113304/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS/ -- R21 AI095848/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- Intramural NIH HHS/ -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2014 Sep 26;345(6204):1623-7. doi: 10.1126/science.1255904. Epub 2014 Sep 11.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Laboratory Medicine, Clinical Center, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA. tfleishe@cc.nih.gov lenardo@nih.gov guzel@niaid.nih.gov. ; Laboratory of Cell Biology, Division of Monoclonal Antibodies, Office of Biotechnology Products, Center for Drug Evaluation and Research, U.S. Food and Drug Administration, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA. tfleishe@cc.nih.gov lenardo@nih.gov guzel@niaid.nih.gov. ; Molecular Development of the Immune System Section, Laboratory of Immunology, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA. NIAID Clinical Genomics Program, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA. tfleishe@cc.nih.gov lenardo@nih.gov guzel@niaid.nih.gov. ; Immunology and Immunodeficiency Group, Immunology Division, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, Sydney, NSW 2010, Australia. St. Vincent's Clinical School Faculty of Medicine, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW 2010, Australia. ; Department of Laboratory Medicine, Clinical Center, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA. ; Immunology and Immunodeficiency Group, Immunology Division, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, Sydney, NSW 2010, Australia. ; Department of Immunobiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT 06511, USA. ; Department of Pediatrics, University of Texas Medical School, Houston, TX 77030, USA. ; NIAID Clinical Genomics Program, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA. Immunological Diseases Unit, Laboratory of Host Defenses, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA. ; Laboratory of Cell Biology, Division of Monoclonal Antibodies, Office of Biotechnology Products, Center for Drug Evaluation and Research, U.S. Food and Drug Administration, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA. ; Hematology Branch, National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA. ; Radiology and Imaging and Sciences, Clinical Center, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA. ; Clinical Research Directorate, Clinical Monitoring Research Program, Leidos Biomedical Research Inc., Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research, Frederick, MD 21702, USA. ; Molecular Development of the Immune System Section, Laboratory of Immunology, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA. NIAID Clinical Genomics Program, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA. ; Liver Diseases Branch, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA. ; Department of Pediatrics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706, USA. ; Department of Pediatrics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706, USA. Department of Medical Microbiology and Immunology, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706, USA. ; Laboratory of Pathology, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA. ; Division of Immunology and Manton Center for Orphan Disease Research, Children's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 10217, USA. ; Laboratory of Clinical Infectious Diseases, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA. ; Merck Research Laboratories, Merck & Co., Boston, MA 02130, USA. ; Instituto de Medicina Integral Prof. Fernando Figueira-IMIP, 50070 Recife-PE, Brazil. ; NIAID Clinical Genomics Program, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA. Laboratory of Clinical Infectious Diseases, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA. ; Laboratory of Clinical Infectious Diseases, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA. tfleishe@cc.nih.gov lenardo@nih.gov guzel@niaid.nih.gov.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25213377" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Adult ; Animals ; B-Lymphocytes/immunology ; CTLA-4 Antigen/*genetics ; Female ; Forkhead Transcription Factors/immunology ; *Germ-Line Mutation ; *Haploinsufficiency ; Humans ; Immune System Diseases/*genetics ; Immunity/*genetics ; Male ; Mice ; Mice, Mutant Strains ; Pedigree ; T-Lymphocytes, Regulatory/immunology ; Young Adult
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  • 8
    Publication Date: 2015-07-25
    Description: Mutations in the LRBA gene (encoding the lipopolysaccharide-responsive and beige-like anchor protein) cause a syndrome of autoimmunity, lymphoproliferation, and humoral immune deficiency. The biological role of LRBA in immunologic disease is unknown. We found that patients with LRBA deficiency manifested a dramatic and sustained improvement in response to abatacept, a CTLA4 (cytotoxic T lymphocyte antigen-4)-immunoglobulin fusion drug. Clinical responses and homology of LRBA to proteins controlling intracellular trafficking led us to hypothesize that it regulates CTLA4, a potent inhibitory immune receptor. We found that LRBA colocalized with CTLA4 in endosomal vesicles and that LRBA deficiency or knockdown increased CTLA4 turnover, which resulted in reduced levels of CTLA4 protein in FoxP3(+) regulatory and activated conventional T cells. In LRBA-deficient cells, inhibition of lysosome degradation with chloroquine prevented CTLA4 loss. These findings elucidate a mechanism for CTLA4 trafficking and control of immune responses and suggest therapies for diseases involving the CTLA4 pathway.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Lo, Bernice -- Zhang, Kejian -- Lu, Wei -- Zheng, Lixin -- Zhang, Qian -- Kanellopoulou, Chrysi -- Zhang, Yu -- Liu, Zhiduo -- Fritz, Jill M -- Marsh, Rebecca -- Husami, Ammar -- Kissell, Diane -- Nortman, Shannon -- Chaturvedi, Vijaya -- Haines, Hilary -- Young, Lisa R -- Mo, Jun -- Filipovich, Alexandra H -- Bleesing, Jack J -- Mustillo, Peter -- Stephens, Michael -- Rueda, Cesar M -- Chougnet, Claire A -- Hoebe, Kasper -- McElwee, Joshua -- Hughes, Jason D -- Karakoc-Aydiner, Elif -- Matthews, Helen F -- Price, Susan -- Su, Helen C -- Rao, V Koneti -- Lenardo, Michael J -- Jordan, Michael B -- 1RC2 HG005608/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- 1ZIAAI000769-14/PHS HHS/ -- Intramural NIH HHS/ -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2015 Jul 24;349(6246):436-40. doi: 10.1126/science.aaa1663.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Molecular Development of the Immune System Section and Clinical and Molecular Genomics Unit, Laboratory of Immunology, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, USA. NIAID Clinical Genomics Program, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, USA. michael.jordan@cchmc.org. ; Division of Human Genetics, Department of Pediatrics, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH, USA. michael.jordan@cchmc.org. ; Molecular Development of the Immune System Section and Clinical and Molecular Genomics Unit, Laboratory of Immunology, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, USA. NIAID Clinical Genomics Program, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, USA. ; NIAID Clinical Genomics Program, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, USA. Human Immunological Diseases Unit, Laboratory of Host Defenses, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, USA. ; Lymphocyte Biology Section, Laboratory of Systems Biology, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, USA. ; Division of Bone Marrow Transplantation and Immune Deficiency, Department of Pediatrics, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH, USA. ; Division of Human Genetics, Department of Pediatrics, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH, USA. ; Division of Pediatric Hematology and Oncology, Department of Pediatrics, University of Alabama at Birmingham, AL, USA. ; Division of Allergy, Immunology, and Pulmonary Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, and Division of Allergy, Pulmonary, and Critical Care, Department of Medicine, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, TN, USA. ; Departments of Pathology and Pediatrics, University of California, San Diego and Rady Children's Hospital, San Diego, CA, USA. ; Section of Allergy and Immunology, Nationwide Children's Hospital, Columbus, OH, USA. ; Department of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA. ; Division of Immunobiology, Department of Pediatrics, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center/ University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH, USA. ; Merck Research Laboratories, Merck & Co, Boston, MA, USA. ; Molecular Development of the Immune System Section and Clinical and Molecular Genomics Unit, Laboratory of Immunology, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, USA. NIAID Clinical Genomics Program, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, USA. Division of Human Genetics, Department of Pediatrics, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH, USA. Human Immunological Diseases Unit, Laboratory of Host Defenses, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, USA. Lymphocyte Biology Section, Laboratory of Systems Biology, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, USA. Division of Bone Marrow Transplantation and Immune Deficiency, Department of Pediatrics, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH, USA. Division of Pediatric Hematology and Oncology, Department of Pediatrics, University of Alabama at Birmingham, AL, USA. Division of Allergy, Immunology, and Pulmonary Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, and Division of Allergy, Pulmonary, and Critical Care, Department of Medicine, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, TN, USA. Departments of Pathology and Pediatrics, University of California, San Diego and Rady Children's Hospital, San Diego, CA, USA. Section of Allergy and Immunology, Nationwide Children's Hospital, Columbus, OH, USA. Department of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA. Division of Immunobiology, Department of Pediatrics, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center/ University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH, USA. Merck Research Laboratories, Merck & Co, Boston, MA, USA. Marmara University, Division of Pediatric Allergy and Immunology, Istanbul, Turkey. ; Division of Bone Marrow Transplantation and Immune Deficiency, Department of Pediatrics, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH, USA. Division of Immunobiology, Department of Pediatrics, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center/ University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH, USA. michael.jordan@cchmc.org.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26206937" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Abatacept ; Adaptor Proteins, Signal Transducing/genetics/*metabolism ; Adolescent ; Autoimmune Diseases/*drug therapy/metabolism ; CTLA-4 Antigen/*deficiency/genetics ; Child ; Chloroquine/pharmacology ; Common Variable Immunodeficiency/*drug therapy/metabolism ; Endosomes/metabolism ; Female ; Forkhead Transcription Factors/analysis ; Gene Knockdown Techniques ; HEK293 Cells ; Humans ; Immunoconjugates/*therapeutic use ; Lung Diseases, Interstitial/drug therapy/metabolism ; Lymphocyte Activation ; Lysosomes/metabolism ; Male ; Proteolysis ; T-Lymphocytes/drug effects/immunology ; Young Adult
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 9
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    American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS)
    Publication Date: 2012-03-31
    Description: 〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Hughes, Katherine J -- Kennedy, Brian K -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2012 Mar 30;335(6076):1578-9. doi: 10.1126/science.1221365.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Buck Institute for Research on Aging, Novato, CA 94945, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22461595" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Female ; *Insulin Resistance ; *Longevity ; Male ; Sirolimus/*pharmacology
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 10
    Publication Date: 2011-03-25
    Description: Arising from M. A. Nowak, C. E. Tarnita & E. O. Wilson 466, 1057-1062 (2010); Nowak et al. reply. The paper by Nowak et al. has the evolution of eusociality as its title, but it is mostly about something else. It argues against inclusive fitness theory and offers an alternative modelling approach that is claimed to be more fundamental and general, but which, we believe, has no practical biological meaning for the evolution of eusociality. Nowak et al. overlook the robust empirical observation that eusociality has only arisen in clades where mothers are associated with their full-sibling offspring; that is, in families where the average relatedness of offspring to siblings is as high as to their own offspring, independent of population structure or ploidy. We believe that this omission makes the paper largely irrelevant for understanding the evolution of eusociality.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Boomsma, Jacobus J -- Beekman, Madeleine -- Cornwallis, Charlie K -- Griffin, Ashleigh S -- Holman, Luke -- Hughes, William O H -- Keller, Laurent -- Oldroyd, Benjamin P -- Ratnieks, Francis L W -- England -- Nature. 2011 Mar 24;471(7339):E4-5; author reply E9-10. doi: 10.1038/nature09832.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21430722" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: *Altruism ; Animals ; *Biological Evolution ; Cooperative Behavior ; Female ; Game Theory ; Genetic Fitness ; Genetics, Population ; Male ; *Models, Biological ; Reproducibility of Results ; Reproduction/physiology ; Selection, Genetic ; Sex Ratio ; *Siblings
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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