ALBERT

All Library Books, journals and Electronic Records Telegrafenberg

feed icon rss

Your email was sent successfully. Check your inbox.

An error occurred while sending the email. Please try again.

Proceed reservation?

Export
  • 1
    Publication Date: 2018-06-06
    Description: Earth science applications of the future will stress the capabilities of even the highest performance supercomputers in the areas of raw compute power, mass storage management, and software environments. These NASA mission critical problems demand usable multi-petaflops and exabyte-scale systems to fully realize their science goals. With an exciting vision of the technologies needed, NASA has established a comprehensive program of advanced research in computer architecture, software tools, and device technology to ensure that, in partnership with US industry, it can meet these demanding requirements with reliable, cost effective, and usable ultra-scale systems. NASA will exploit, explore, and influence emerging high end computing architectures and technologies to accelerate the next generation of engineering, operations, and discovery processes for NASA Enterprises. This article captures this vision and describes the concepts, accomplishments, and the potential payoff of the key thrusts that will help meet the computational challenges in Earth science applications.
    Keywords: Computer Operations and Hardware
    Format: application/pdf
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 2
    Publication Date: 2019-07-13
    Description: The convergence of scalable computer architectures using clusters of PCs (or PC-SMPs) with commodity networking has become an attractive platform for high end scientific computing. Currently, message-passing and shared address space (SAS) are the two leading programming paradigms for these systems. Message-passing has been standardized with MPI, and is the most common and mature programming approach. However message-passing code development can be extremely difficult, especially for irregular structured computations. SAS offers substantial ease of programming, but may suffer from performance limitations due to poor spatial locality, and high protocol overhead. In this paper, we compare the performance of and programming effort, required for six applications under both programming models on a 32 CPU PC-SMP cluster. Our application suite consists of codes that typically do not exhibit high efficiency under shared memory programming. due to their high communication to computation ratios and complex communication patterns. Results indicate that SAS can achieve about half the parallel efficiency of MPI for most of our applications: however, on certain classes of problems SAS performance is competitive with MPI. We also present new algorithms for improving the PC cluster performance of MPI collective operations.
    Keywords: Computer Operations and Hardware
    Type: IPDPS Conference; 23 Apr. 2001; San Francisco, CA; United States
    Format: application/pdf
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 3
    Publication Date: 2019-07-13
    Description: The increasing gap between processor and memory performance has lead to new architectural models for memory-intensive applications. In this paper, we explore the performance of a set of memory-intensive benchmarks and use them to compare the performance of conventional cache-based microprocessors to a mixed logic and DRAM processor called VIRAM. The benchmarks are based on problem statements, rather than specific implementations, and in each case we explore the fundamental hardware requirements of the problem, as well as alternative algorithms and data structures that can help expose fine-grained parallelism or simplify memory access patterns. The benchmarks are characterized by their memory access patterns, their basic control structures, and the ratio of computation to memory operation.
    Keywords: Computer Operations and Hardware
    Type: IPDPS Conference; 15-19 Apr. 2002; Fort Lauderdale, FL; United States
    Format: text
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 4
    Publication Date: 2019-07-13
    Description: In this paper, we present performance analysis of two NASA applications using performance tools like Tuning and Analysis Utilities (TAU) and SGI MPInside. MITgcmUV and OVERFLOW are two production-quality applications used extensively by scientists and engineers at NASA. MITgcmUV is a global ocean simulation model, developed by the Estimating the Circulation and Climate of the Ocean (ECCO) Consortium, for solving the fluid equations of motion using the hydrostatic approximation. OVERFLOW is a general-purpose Navier-Stokes solver for computational fluid dynamics (CFD) problems. Using these tools, we analyze the MPI functions (MPI_Sendrecv, MPI_Bcast, MPI_Reduce, MPI_Allreduce, MPI_Barrier, etc.) with respect to message size of each rank, time consumed by each function, and how ranks communicate. MPI communication is further analyzed by studying the performance of MPI functions used in these two applications as a function of message size and number of cores. Finally, we present the compute time, communication time, and I/O time as a function of the number of cores.
    Keywords: Computer Operations and Hardware
    Type: ARC-E-DAA-TN1911 , 12th IEEE HPCC conference; 1-3 Sep. 2010; Melbourne; Australia
    Format: application/pdf
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 5
    Publication Date: 2019-07-13
    Description: This viewgraph presentation explores the need for a NASA Advanced Supercomputing (NAS) parallel benchmark for problems with irregular dynamical memory access. This benchmark is important and necessary because: 1) Problems with localized error source benefit from adaptive nonuniform meshes; 2) Certain machines perform poorly on such problems; 3) Parallel implementation may provide further performance improvement but is difficult. Some examples of problems which use irregular dynamical memory access include: 1) Heat transfer problem; 2) Heat source term; 3) Spectral element method; 4) Base functions; 5) Elemental discrete equations; 6) Global discrete equations. Nonconforming Mesh and Mortar Element Method are covered in greater detail in this presentation.
    Keywords: Computer Operations and Hardware
    Type: ADAPT03: Conference on Adaptive Methods for PDEs and Large-Scale Computation; 11-12 Oct. 2003; Troy, NY; United States
    Format: application/pdf
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 6
    Publication Date: 2019-07-10
    Description: This paper examines the applications most commonly run on the supercomputers at the Numerical Aerospace Simulation (NAS) facility. It analyzes the extent to which such applications are fundamentally oriented to vector computers, and whether or not they can be efficiently implemented on hierarchical memory machines, such as systems with cache memories and highly parallel, distributed memory systems.
    Keywords: Computer Operations and Hardware
    Type: NAS-97-031
    Format: application/pdf
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 7
    Publication Date: 2019-07-10
    Description: The last decade has witnessed a rapid proliferation of superscalar cache-based microprocessors to build high-end capability and cost effectiveness. However, the recent development of massively parallel vector systems is having a significant effect on the supercomputing landscape. In this paper, we compare the performance of the recently released Cray X1 vector system with that of the cacheless NEC SX-6 vector machine, and the superscalar cache-based IBM Power3 and Power4 architectures for scientific applications. Overall results demonstrate that the X1 is quite promising, but performance improvements are expected as the hardware, systems software, and numerical libraries mature. Code reengineering to effectively utilize the complex architecture may also lead to significant efficiency enhancements.
    Keywords: Computer Operations and Hardware
    Format: text
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 8
    Publication Date: 2019-07-13
    Description: NASA has increasingly relied on high-performance computing (HPC) re- sources for computational modeling, simulation, and data analysis to meet the science and engineering goals of its missions in space exploration, aeronautics, and Earth and space science. The NASA Advanced Supercomputing (NAS) Division at Ames Research Center in Silicon Valley, Calif., hosts NASAs premier supercomputing resources, integral to achieving and enhancing the success of the agencys missions. NAS provides a balanced environment, funded under the High-End Computing Capability (HECC) project, comprised of world-class supercomputers, including its flagship distributed-memory cluster, Pleiades; high-speed networking; and massive data storage facilities, along with multi-disciplinary support teams for user support, code porting and optimization, and large-scale data analysis and scientific visualization. However, as scientists have increased the fidelity of their simulations and engineers are conducting larger parameter-space studies, the requirements for supercomputing resources have been growing by leaps and bounds. With the facility housing the HECC systems reaching its power and cooling capacity, NAS undertook a prototype project to investigate an alternative approach for housing supercomputers. Modular supercomputing, or container-based computing, is an innovative concept for expanding NASAs HPC capabilities. With modular supercomputing, additional containerssimilar to portable storage podscan be connected together as needed to accommodate the agencys ever-increasing demand for computing resources. In addition, taking advantage of the local weather permits the use of cooling technologies that would additionally save energy and reduce annual water usage. The first stage of NASAs Modular Supercomputing Facility (MSF) prototype, which resulted in a 1,000 square-foot module on a concrete pad with room for 16 compute racks, was completed in Fall 2016 and an SGI (now HPE) computer system, named Electra, was deployed there in early 2017. Cooling is performed via an evaporative system built into the module, and preliminary experience shows a Power Usage Effectiveness (PUE) measurement of 1.03. Electra achieved over a petaflop on the LINPACK benchmark, sufficient to rank number 96 on the November 2016 TOP500 list [14]. The system consists of 1,152 InfiniBand-connected Intel Xeon Broadwell-based nodes. Its users access their files on a facility-wide file system shared by all HECC compute assets via Mellanox MetroX InfiniBand extenders, which connect the Electra fabric to Lustre routers in the primary facility over fiber-optic links about 900 feet long. The MSF prototype has exceeded expectations and is serving as a blueprint for future expansions. In the remainder of this chapter, we detail how modular data center technology can be used to expand an existing compute resource. We begin by describing NASAs requirements for supercomputing and how resources were provided prior to the integration of the Electra module-based system.
    Keywords: Computer Operations and Hardware
    Type: ARC-E-DAA-TN47639 , Contemporary High Performance Computing: From Petascale toward Exascale; 3
    Format: application/pdf
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
Close ⊗
This website uses cookies and the analysis tool Matomo. More information can be found here...