ALBERT

All Library Books, journals and Electronic Records Telegrafenberg

feed icon rss

Your email was sent successfully. Check your inbox.

An error occurred while sending the email. Please try again.

Proceed reservation?

Export
Filter
  • Biological Evolution  (6)
  • American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS)  (6)
  • Wiley
Collection
Publisher
  • 1
    Publication Date: 2010-05-15
    Description: It is predicted that climate change will cause species extinctions and distributional shifts in coming decades, but data to validate these predictions are relatively scarce. Here, we compare recent and historical surveys for 48 Mexican lizard species at 200 sites. Since 1975, 12% of local populations have gone extinct. We verified physiological models of extinction risk with observed local extinctions and extended projections worldwide. Since 1975, we estimate that 4% of local populations have gone extinct worldwide, but by 2080 local extinctions are projected to reach 39% worldwide, and species extinctions may reach 20%. Global extinction projections were validated with local extinctions observed from 1975 to 2009 for regional biotas on four other continents, suggesting that lizards have already crossed a threshold for extinctions caused by climate change.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Sinervo, Barry -- Mendez-de-la-Cruz, Fausto -- Miles, Donald B -- Heulin, Benoit -- Bastiaans, Elizabeth -- Villagran-Santa Cruz, Maricela -- Lara-Resendiz, Rafael -- Martinez-Mendez, Norberto -- Calderon-Espinosa, Martha Lucia -- Meza-Lazaro, Rubi Nelsi -- Gadsden, Hector -- Avila, Luciano Javier -- Morando, Mariana -- De la Riva, Ignacio J -- Victoriano Sepulveda, Pedro -- Rocha, Carlos Frederico Duarte -- Ibarguengoytia, Nora -- Aguilar Puntriano, Cesar -- Massot, Manuel -- Lepetz, Virginie -- Oksanen, Tuula A -- Chapple, David G -- Bauer, Aaron M -- Branch, William R -- Clobert, Jean -- Sites, Jack W Jr -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2010 May 14;328(5980):894-9. doi: 10.1126/science.1184695.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064, USA. lizardrps@gmail.com〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20466932" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Acclimatization ; Animals ; *Biodiversity ; Biological Evolution ; Body Temperature ; *Climate Change ; *Ecosystem ; *Extinction, Biological ; Female ; Forecasting ; Geography ; Global Warming ; *Lizards/genetics/physiology ; Male ; Mexico ; Models, Biological ; Phylogeny ; Population Dynamics ; Reproduction ; Seasons ; Selection, Genetic ; Temperature
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 2
    Publication Date: 2015-04-11
    Description: Mountain gorillas are an endangered great ape subspecies and a prominent focus for conservation, yet we know little about their genomic diversity and evolutionary past. We sequenced whole genomes from multiple wild individuals and compared the genomes of all four Gorilla subspecies. We found that the two eastern subspecies have experienced a prolonged population decline over the past 100,000 years, resulting in very low genetic diversity and an increased overall burden of deleterious variation. A further recent decline in the mountain gorilla population has led to extensive inbreeding, such that individuals are typically homozygous at 34% of their sequence, leading to the purging of severely deleterious recessive mutations from the population. We discuss the causes of their decline and the consequences for their future survival.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4668944/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4668944/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Xue, Yali -- Prado-Martinez, Javier -- Sudmant, Peter H -- Narasimhan, Vagheesh -- Ayub, Qasim -- Szpak, Michal -- Frandsen, Peter -- Chen, Yuan -- Yngvadottir, Bryndis -- Cooper, David N -- de Manuel, Marc -- Hernandez-Rodriguez, Jessica -- Lobon, Irene -- Siegismund, Hans R -- Pagani, Luca -- Quail, Michael A -- Hvilsom, Christina -- Mudakikwa, Antoine -- Eichler, Evan E -- Cranfield, Michael R -- Marques-Bonet, Tomas -- Tyler-Smith, Chris -- Scally, Aylwyn -- 098051/Wellcome Trust/United Kingdom -- 099769/Z/12/Z/Wellcome Trust/United Kingdom -- 260372/European Research Council/International -- HG002385/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- R01 HG002385/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- Howard Hughes Medical Institute/ -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2015 Apr 10;348(6231):242-5. doi: 10.1126/science.aaa3952. Epub 2015 Apr 9.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, Wellcome Trust Genome Campus, Hinxton CB10 1SA, UK. ; Institut de Biologia Evolutiva (CSIC/UPF), Parque de Investigacion Biomedica de Barcelona (PRBB), Barcelona, Catalonia 08003, Spain. ; Department of Genome Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195, USA. ; Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, Wellcome Trust Genome Campus, Hinxton CB10 1SA, UK. Department of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB3 0WA, UK. ; Department of Biology, University of Copenhagen, DK-2200 Copenhagen N, Denmark. ; Institute of Medical Genetics, Cardiff University, Cardiff CF14 4XN, UK. ; Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, Wellcome Trust Genome Campus, Hinxton CB10 1SA, UK. Department of Biological, Geological and Environmental Sciences, University of Bologna, 40134 Bologna, Italy. ; Research and Conservation, Copenhagen Zoo, DK-2000 Frederiksberg, Denmark. ; Rwanda Development Board, KG 9 Avenue, Kigali, Rwanda. ; Department of Genome Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195, USA. Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Seattle, WA 91895, USA. ; Gorilla Doctors, Karen C. Drayer Wildlife Health Center, University of California, Davis, CA 95616, USA. ; Institut de Biologia Evolutiva (CSIC/UPF), Parque de Investigacion Biomedica de Barcelona (PRBB), Barcelona, Catalonia 08003, Spain. Centro Nacional de Analisis Genomico (Parc Cientific de Barcelona), Baldiri Reixac 4, 08028 Barcelona, Spain. ; Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, Wellcome Trust Genome Campus, Hinxton CB10 1SA, UK. cts@sanger.ac.uk aos21@cam.ac.uk. ; Department of Genetics, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 3EH, UK. cts@sanger.ac.uk aos21@cam.ac.uk.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25859046" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Adaptation, Physiological ; Animals ; Biological Evolution ; DNA Copy Number Variations ; Democratic Republic of the Congo ; Endangered Species ; Female ; *Genetic Variation ; *Genome ; Gorilla gorilla/classification/*genetics/physiology ; Homozygote ; *Inbreeding ; Linkage Disequilibrium ; Male ; Mutation ; Population Dynamics ; Rwanda ; Selection, Genetic ; Sequence Analysis, DNA ; Species Specificity ; Time Factors
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 3
    Publication Date: 2010-04-10
    Description: Transcription factors (TFs) direct gene expression by binding to DNA regulatory regions. To explore the evolution of gene regulation, we used chromatin immunoprecipitation with high-throughput sequencing (ChIP-seq) to determine experimentally the genome-wide occupancy of two TFs, CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein alpha and hepatocyte nuclear factor 4 alpha, in the livers of five vertebrates. Although each TF displays highly conserved DNA binding preferences, most binding is species-specific, and aligned binding events present in all five species are rare. Regions near genes with expression levels that are dependent on a TF are often bound by the TF in multiple species yet show no enhanced DNA sequence constraint. Binding divergence between species can be largely explained by sequence changes to the bound motifs. Among the binding events lost in one lineage, only half are recovered by another binding event within 10 kilobases. Our results reveal large interspecies differences in transcriptional regulation and provide insight into regulatory evolution.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3008766/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3008766/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Schmidt, Dominic -- Wilson, Michael D -- Ballester, Benoit -- Schwalie, Petra C -- Brown, Gordon D -- Marshall, Aileen -- Kutter, Claudia -- Watt, Stephen -- Martinez-Jimenez, Celia P -- Mackay, Sarah -- Talianidis, Iannis -- Flicek, Paul -- Odom, Duncan T -- 062023/Wellcome Trust/United Kingdom -- 079643/Wellcome Trust/United Kingdom -- 15603/Cancer Research UK/United Kingdom -- 202218/European Research Council/International -- A15603/Cancer Research UK/United Kingdom -- WT062023/Wellcome Trust/United Kingdom -- WT079643/Wellcome Trust/United Kingdom -- Cancer Research UK/United Kingdom -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2010 May 21;328(5981):1036-40. doi: 10.1126/science.1186176. Epub 2010 Apr 8.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Cancer Research UK, Cambridge Research Institute, Li Ka Shing Centre, Robinson Way, Cambridge CB2 0RE, UK.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20378774" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Algorithms ; Animals ; Base Sequence ; Binding Sites ; Biological Evolution ; CCAAT-Enhancer-Binding Protein-alpha/*metabolism ; Chickens/genetics ; Chromatin Immunoprecipitation ; DNA/genetics/metabolism ; Dogs ; *Evolution, Molecular ; *Gene Expression Regulation ; *Genome ; Genome, Human ; Hepatocyte Nuclear Factor 4/*metabolism ; Humans ; Liver/*metabolism ; Mice ; Opossums/genetics ; Protein Binding ; Regulatory Sequences, Nucleic Acid ; Sequence Analysis, DNA ; Species Specificity ; Vertebrates/*genetics/metabolism
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 4
    Publication Date: 2011-01-15
    Description: Upper Triassic rocks in northwestern Argentina preserve the most complete record of dinosaurs before their rise to dominance in the Early Jurassic. Here, we describe a previously unidentified basal theropod, reassess its contemporary Eoraptor as a basal sauropodomorph, divide the faunal record of the Ischigualasto Formation with biozones, and bracket the formation with (40)Ar/(39)Ar ages. Some 230 million years ago in the Late Triassic (mid Carnian), the earliest dinosaurs were the dominant terrestrial carnivores and small herbivores in southwestern Pangaea. The extinction of nondinosaurian herbivores is sequential and is not linked to an increase in dinosaurian diversity, which weakens the predominant scenario for dinosaurian ascendancy as opportunistic replacement.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Martinez, Ricardo N -- Sereno, Paul C -- Alcober, Oscar A -- Colombi, Carina E -- Renne, Paul R -- Montanez, Isabel P -- Currie, Brian S -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2011 Jan 14;331(6014):206-10. doi: 10.1126/science.1198467.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Instituto y Museo de Ciencias Naturales, Universidad Nacional de San Juan, San Juan 5400, Argentina.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21233386" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Argentina ; Biological Evolution ; Bone and Bones/anatomy & histology ; Dinosaurs/*anatomy & histology/*classification ; Extinction, Biological ; Femur/anatomy & histology ; *Fossils ; Phylogeny ; Skull/anatomy & histology ; Spine/anatomy & histology
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 5
    facet.materialart.
    Unknown
    American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS)
    Publication Date: 1994-10-28
    Description: 〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Rubenstein, J L -- Martinez, S -- Shimamura, K -- Puelles, L -- MH01046-01/MH/NIMH NIH HHS/ -- MH49428-01/MH/NIMH NIH HHS/ -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 1994 Oct 28;266(5185):578-80.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Nina Ireland Laboratory of Developmental Neurobiology, University of California, San Francisco 94143-0984.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/7939711" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Biological Evolution ; Central Nervous System/embryology ; Diencephalon/embryology ; Embryonic and Fetal Development ; Gene Expression Regulation, Developmental ; Genes, Homeobox ; Genes, Regulator ; *Models, Biological ; Morphogenesis ; Prosencephalon/*embryology
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 6
    Publication Date: 1989-02-10
    Description: Animals clearly choose what they eat and can even choose among chemically different sugars. The physiological and biochemical mechanisms that constrain feeding choices are largely unknown. In this study, European starlings (Sturnus vulgaris) preferred mixture solutions of D-glucose plus D-fructose to equimolar (double molar caloric value) solutions of sucrose. Intubation feeding of sucrose did not increase blood glucose levels. Sucrose is a useless energy source for these birds because they lack a single digestive enzyme (sucrase) on the small intestinal brush border membrane. However, the membranes possessed separate maltase and isomaltase disaccharidases. This expression pattern and expression patterns of membrane disaccharidases among mammals suggest a role for intestinal enzymes in the coevolutionary interactions between vertebrates and their plant food sources.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Martinez del Rio, C -- Stevens, B R -- DK-38715/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 1989 Feb 10;243(4892):794-6.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Zoology, University of Florida, Gainesville 32611.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/2916126" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Biological Evolution ; Birds/*physiology ; Disaccharidases/physiology ; Disaccharides/metabolism ; Feeding Behavior/*physiology ; Intestinal Mucosa/enzymology ; Intestines/*physiology ; Microvilli/enzymology ; Sucrase/metabolism
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
Close ⊗
This website uses cookies and the analysis tool Matomo. More information can be found here...