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  • Wiley  (4)
  • American Geophysical Union (AGU)  (1)
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  • 1
    Publication Date: 2011-10-29
    Description: Natural floodplains are spatially heterogeneous and dynamic ecosystems, but at the same time, a highly endangered landscape feature due to climate change and human impacts such as water storage, flood control and hydropower production. Flow is considered a master variable that shapes channel morphology, and the heterogeneity, distribution, and turnover of floodplain habitats. Despite their highly dynamic nature, the relative abundance of different habitat elements (islands, gravel bars) in natural floodplains seems to remain relatively constant over ecological time periods, and is referred to as the “shifting mosaic steady state” concept. In this conceptual context, we analysed spatio-temporal changes in relative habitat abundance and channel complexity of an alpine floodplain from its near natural state in 1940 before water abstraction and levee construction till 2007 using historical aerial images. Within the first decades of impairment, the relative abundance of floodplain habitats that depend on flood and flow pulses such as parafluvial channels and islands shifted towards a greater abundance of terrestrial forest and grassland habitats. After 1986, the duration and frequencies of high precipitation events (〉60 mm 24 h -1 ) triggering major, channel-reworking floods increased substantially and caused a restructuring of the floodplain and decrease in the abundance of more terrestrial habitat types. These results are contrary to expectations of the “shifting mosaic steady state” concept, yet suggest its potential application as an indicator of landscape transformation and human impacts on floodplain ecosystems. Lastly, the results raise the applied question as to whether an increased frequency of high flow events induced by climate change can contribute to floodplain restoration. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
    Print ISSN: 0885-6087
    Electronic ISSN: 1099-1085
    Topics: Architecture, Civil Engineering, Surveying , Geography
    Published by Wiley
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  • 2
    Publication Date: 2019
    Description: Abstract Natural floodplains are characterized by a complex habitat mosaic. However, damming, water storage, and hydropower production affect many floodplains by altering their natural habitat diversity. Field sampling data and imaging spectroscopy are used in combination with statistical models to assess resource allocation strategies of willow stands in perialpine floodplains. Three contrasting floodplain reaches located along two rivers in Switzerland serve as test beds: The Sarine River is partitioned into an upstream and downstream segment under the influence of a dam and a hydropower plant, while the Sense River represents an undisturbed, natural floodplain. Airborne imaging spectrometer data allow mapping of spatially distributed Competitor/Stress tolerator/Ruderal (CSR) strategies using a partial least square modeling approach. Using cross validation, we demonstrate that a statistical modeling approach can reveal variations in CSR scores based on the StrateFy model. Such intraspecific variation of CSR scores cannot be captured by a strategy categorization based solely on the species. Results reveal that willows shifted toward more competition and less stress tolerance along hydrologically altered reaches compared to the willows strategy along the natural control. Moreover, the overall distribution of strategies indicates that stress factors (i.e., limiting growth factors), rather than disturbance (i.e., events leading to partial or total destruction), shape the plant traits of alluvial willow trees. Detailed assessments of resource allocation strategies contribute to a more complete understanding of the continuous and reciprocal shaping between flow regimes, landforms, and alluvial vegetation.
    Print ISSN: 2169-8953
    Electronic ISSN: 2169-8961
    Topics: Biology , Geosciences
    Published by Wiley on behalf of American Geophysical Union (AGU).
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  • 3
    Publication Date: 2019-07-01
    Print ISSN: 2169-8953
    Electronic ISSN: 2169-8961
    Topics: Geosciences , Biology
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  • 4
    Publication Date: 2007-01-01
    Print ISSN: 0197-9337
    Electronic ISSN: 1096-9837
    Topics: Geography , Geosciences
    Published by Wiley on behalf of British Society for Geomorphology (BSG).
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  • 5
    Publication Date: 2012-01-09
    Description: Natural floodplains are spatially heterogeneous and dynamic ecosystems but at the same time, a highly endangered landscape feature due to climate change and human impacts such as water storage, flood control and hydropower production. Flow is considered a master variable that shapes channel morphology and the heterogeneity, distribution, and turnover of floodplain habitats. Despite their highly dynamic nature, the relative abundance of different habitat elements (islands, gravel bars) in natural floodplains seems to remain relatively constant over ecological periods and is referred to as the shifting mosaic steady state concept. In this conceptual context, we analysed spatiotemporal changes in relative habitat abundance and channel complexity of an alpine floodplain from its near natural state in 1940 before water abstraction and levee construction until 2007 using historical aerial images. Within the first decades of impairment, the relative abundance of floodplain habitats that depend on flood and flow pulses such as parafluvial channels and islands shifted toward a greater abundance of terrestrial forest and grassland habitats. After 1986, the duration and frequencies of high-precipitation events (〉60mm 24h -1 ) triggering major, channel-reworking floods increased substantially and caused a restructuring of the floodplain and decrease in the abundance of more terrestrial habitat types. These results are contrary to expectations of the shifting mosaic steady state concept yet suggest its potential application as an indicator of landscape transformation and human impacts on floodplain ecosystems. Last, the results raise the applied question as to whether an increased frequency of high flow events induced by climate change can contribute to floodplain restoration. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
    Print ISSN: 0885-6087
    Electronic ISSN: 1099-1085
    Topics: Architecture, Civil Engineering, Surveying , Geography
    Published by Wiley
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
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