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  • 1
    Publication Date: 2013-03-15
    Description: Based on Optically Stimulated Luminescence (OSL) and radiocarbon dating we establish chronologies of colluviation and alluviation in different floodplain sections of the northwestern Wetterau loess basin (Germany). Similar to some other European valley floors, Holocene floodplain aggradation is marked by two important breaks: (1) a millennial-scale delay between the Neolithic agricultural colluviation and floodplain aggradation. In loess catchments agricultural colluviation started at about 7000 cal. BP and anthropogenic floodplain aggradation only at about 2200 ± 200 cal. BP; (2) a centennial-scale variability in a temporary rise in rates of anthropogenic floodplain aggradation (up to 3.6 ± 1.7 mm/yr) during the High Middle Ages in directly neighbouring reaches. Independent archaeologic, historic, and vegetation records document distinct agricultural histories of hillsides and floodplains and highlight the importance of hydrosedimentary connectivity as compared with land use intensity. The late Iron Age start of alluviation can be linked to the introduction of an integrated land use system with intense cultivation on hillsides and immediate neighbouring floodplains. The centennial-scale variability of medieval peak aggradation is a result of the successive introduction (or temporal failure) of hydraulic water milling infrastructure. Using palaeoecological and geomorphological information for reconstructing cause and consequence of sediment redistribution in coupled human–natural systems requires firm information about the spatial organisation and technological abilities that are associated with socio-agricultural transformations.
    Print ISSN: 0959-6836
    Electronic ISSN: 1477-0911
    Topics: Geography , Geosciences
    Published by Sage
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  • 2
    Publication Date: 2016-09-10
    Description: Rebun Island with Hamanaka and Funadomari among the 43 documented archaeological sites and the environmental archive stored in the Lake Kushu sediment proves to be one of the key areas to study the interplay between ecology, climate and human activities. This paper focuses on the potential of palaeobotanical records from Rebun Island for improving the chronological control and understanding of late Quaternary climate changes and habitation environments of northern hunter-gatherers in the Hokkaido Region of Japan. A set of 57 radiocarbon dates of the RK12 core (Lake Kushu) demonstrates that it represents a continuous environmental archive covering the last c . 17,000 years. The RK12 pollen record reflects distinct vegetation changes associated with the onset of the lateglacial warming about 15,000 cal. yr BP and the cold climate reversal after c . 13,000 cal. yr BP. The onset of the current Holocene interglacial after c . 11,700 cal. yr BP is marked by a major spread of trees. The middle Holocene ( c . 8000–4000 cal. yr BP) is characterized by a major spread of deciduous oak in the vegetation cover reflecting a temperature increase. A decline of oak and spread of fir and pine is recorded at c . 2000 cal. yr BP. After c . 1100 cal. yr BP, arboreal pollen percentages decrease, possibly linked to intensified usage of wood during the Okhotsk and Ainu culture periods. The results of diatom analysis suggest marshy or deltaic environments at the RK12 coring site prior to c . 10,500 cal. yr BP and a brackish lagoon between c . 10,500 and 7000 cal. yr BP. A freshwater lake developed after 6500 cal. yr BP, likely reflecting sea level stabilization and formation of the sand bar separating the Kushu depression from the sea. Plant macrofossil analysis shows use of various wild plants and also domesticated barley during the Okhotsk and Ainu periods.
    Print ISSN: 0959-6836
    Electronic ISSN: 1477-0911
    Topics: Geography , Geosciences
    Published by Sage
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
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