ALBERT

All Library Books, journals and Electronic Records Telegrafenberg

feed icon rss

Your email was sent successfully. Check your inbox.

An error occurred while sending the email. Please try again.

Proceed reservation?

Export
Filter
  • American Institute of Physics (AIP)  (7)
  • American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS)  (5)
  • International Union of Crystallography (IUCr)  (2)
  • Amsterdam : Elsevier
  • 2000-2004  (15)
Collection
Language
Year
  • 1
    Call number: ILP/M 06.0353
    In: Publication of the International Lithosphere Programme
    In: Tectonophysics
    Type of Medium: Monograph available for loan
    Pages: vi, 271 S. : Ill., graph. Darst.
    Series Statement: [Publication of the International Lithosphere Programme] 381,1-4 : special issue
    Language: English
    Location: Reading room
    Branch Library: GFZ Library
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 2
    ISSN: 1077-3118
    Source: AIP Digital Archive
    Topics: Physics
    Notes: We present in situ surface x-ray scattering measurements of PbTiO3 epitaxy by metal–organic chemical-vapor deposition. Oscillations in crystal truncation rod intensity corresponding to layer-by-layer growth are observed under a variety of growth conditions. At lower PbO overpressures, we observe a transition to step-flow growth and an increased rate of recovery after growth, indicating a higher surface mobility. © 2002 American Institute of Physics.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 3
    ISSN: 1077-3118
    Source: AIP Digital Archive
    Topics: Physics
    Notes: A technique for selective characterization of the structure of free and buried thin-film interfaces by vibrationally resonant sum frequency generation spectroscopy is described. Manipulation of Fresnel coefficients by choice of film thickness on a reflecting substrate allows simultaneous optimization of the signal from the desired interface and minimization of the signal from other interfacial sources. This technique is demonstrated for the free polystyrene (PS)/air and the buried PS/spin-on glass interfaces. Our spectra show that the pendant phenyl group orientation is similar at the buried and free interfaces, with the phenyls pointing away from the bulk PS at each interface.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 4
    ISSN: 1089-7690
    Source: AIP Digital Archive
    Topics: Physics , Chemistry and Pharmacology
    Notes: The collision-induced electronic energy transfer that occurs when I2 in the E(0g+) ion-pair electronic state collides with ground electronic state I2 has been investigated. We prepare I2 in single rotational levels in v=0 of the E state using two-color double resonance laser excitation. The resulting emission spectrum shows that the nearby (ΔTe=−385 cm−1) D(0u+) electronic state is populated. The cross section for collision-induced E→D energy transfer is found to be 18±3 Å2. A range of D state vibrational levels are populated, consistent with a model in which overlap between the initial and final vibrational wave functions is important, but modulated by propensities for small vibrational energy gaps and those energy gaps that are closely matched to the v=0→v=1 energy separation in the I2(X) collision partner. © 2001 American Institute of Physics.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 5
    ISSN: 1089-7623
    Source: AIP Digital Archive
    Topics: Physics , Electrical Engineering, Measurement and Control Technology
    Notes: This talk will describe proposed studies of atomic- and nanoscale dynamics in condensed matter which take advantage of the high coherent x-ray flux to be produced by future x-ray free-electron laser (FEL) sources, such as the Linac Coherent Light Source at Stanford. In particular, I will focus on the current status and future prospects for photon correlation spectroscopy using coherent x-rays (XPCS), and the use of the ultrashort pulse structure of the x-ray FEL to observe dynamics into the femtosecond range. © 2002 American Institute of Physics.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 6
    Electronic Resource
    Electronic Resource
    College Park, Md. : American Institute of Physics (AIP)
    The Journal of Chemical Physics 112 (2000), S. 2265-2273 
    ISSN: 1089-7690
    Source: AIP Digital Archive
    Topics: Physics , Chemistry and Pharmacology
    Notes: Quantum mechanical calculations on the vibrational predissociation dynamics of NeBr2 in the B electronic state have been performed and the results compared with both experimental data and other computational studies. For vibrational levels with v≤20 we find that the vibrational state dependence of the predissociation lifetimes is in qualitative agreement with experimental measurements, as are the calculated Br2 fragment rotational distributions. For higher vibrational levels, the B←X excitation profiles are well represented by a sum of two Lorentzian line shapes. We attribute this result to the presence of long-lived resonances in the dissociative continuum that are reminiscent of long-lived dissociative trajectories in previous classical studies of NeBr2. © 2000 American Institute of Physics.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 7
    ISSN: 1600-5775
    Source: Crystallography Journals Online : IUCR Backfile Archive 1948-2001
    Topics: Geosciences , Physics
    Notes: X-ray magnetic circular dichroism studies of magnetic 3d transition-metal samples require the recording of high-quality absorption scans in high magnetic fields using circularly polarized soft X-rays of energies in the range 0.5–1 keV. Normally this is performed by electron yield measurements in vacuum. This technique is rendered problematic by the influence of the high magnetic field on the motion of the electrons emitted. Detection of the fluorescent X-rays avoids this problem and eases the constraints of sample preparation and environment. However, the specifications required for a successful X-ray detector are severe, requiring an insensitivity to magnetic fields up to 4 T (for hysteresis curve measurements), a large dynamic range, detection of soft X-rays with good efficiency and signal to noise and containment of the detector structure within a space of a few cm3. Such a detector has been developed using gas microstrip technology and tests show that these requirements can be met.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 8
    ISSN: 1089-7690
    Source: AIP Digital Archive
    Topics: Physics , Chemistry and Pharmacology
    Notes: The electronic energy transfer pathways that occur following collisions between I2 in the E ion-pair electronic state (v=0, J=55) and He and Ar atoms have been determined. The nearby D, D′, and β ion-pair states are populated, but with relative branching ratios that vary with the rare gas collision partner. In He/I2 collisions, the D state is preferentially populated, while Ar/I2 collisions preferentially populate the β electronic state. Bimolecular rate constants and effective hard sphere collision cross sections have been determined for each channel; the cross sections range from 7.0±1.0 Å2 for populating the β state with Ar collisions to 0.9±0.2 Å2 for populating the D′ state with He collisions. For both rare gas collision partners, and all three final electronic states, low vibrational levels are populated, in rough accord with the relevant Franck–Condon factors. There is little propensity observed for population of vibrational levels that are in near resonance with the initially prepared level in the E state. © 2002 American Institute of Physics.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 9
    ISSN: 1089-7690
    Source: AIP Digital Archive
    Topics: Physics , Chemistry and Pharmacology
    Notes: The mechanism of the reaction CH4+O(1D2)→CH3+OH was investigated by ultrafast, time-resolved and state-resolved experiments. In the ultrafast experiments, short ultraviolet pulses photolyzed ozone in the CH4⋅O3 van der Waals complex to produce O(1D2). The ensuing reaction with CH4 was monitored by measuring the appearance rate of OH(v=0,1;J,Ω,Λ) by laser-induced fluorescence, through the OH A←X transition, using short probe pulses. These spectrally broad pulses, centered between 307 and 316 nm, probe many different OH rovibrational states simultaneously. At each probe wavelength, both a fast and a slow rise time were evident in the fluorescence signal, and the ratio of the fast-to-slow signal varied with probe wavelength. The distribution of OH(v,J,Ω,Λ) states, Pobs(v,J,Ω,Λ), was determined by laser-induced fluorescence using a high-resolution, tunable dye laser. The Pobs(v,J,Ω,Λ) data and the time-resolved data were analyzed under the assumption that different formation times represent different reaction mechanisms and that each mechanism produces a characteristic rovibrational distribution. The state-resolved and the time-resolved data can be fit independently using a two-mechanism model: Pobs(v,J,Ω,Λ) can be decomposed into two components, and the appearance of OH can be fit by two exponential rise times. However, these independent analyses are not mutually consistent. The time-resolved and state-resolved data can be consistently fit using a three-mechanism model. The OH appearance signals, at all probe wavelengths, were fit with times τfast(approximate)0.2 ps, τinter(approximate)0.5 ps and τslow(approximate)5.4 ps. The slowest of these three is the rate for dissociation of a vibrationally excited methanol intermediate (CH3OH*) predicted by statistical theory after complete intramolecular energy redistribution following insertion of O(1D2) into CH4. The Pobs(v,J,Ω,Λ) was decomposed into three components, each with a linear surprisal, under the assumption that the mechanism producing OH at a statistical rate would be characterized by a statistical prior. Dissociation of a CH4O* intermediate before complete energy randomization was identified as producing OH at the intermediate rate and was associated with a population distribution with more rovibrational energy than the slow mechanism. The third mechanism produces OH promptly with a cold rovibrational distribution, indicative of a collinear abstraction mechanism. After these identifications were made, it was possible to predict the fraction of signal associated with each mechanism at different probe wavelengths in the ultrafast experiment, and the predictions proved consistent with measured appearance signals. This model also reconciles data from a variety of previous experiments. While this model is the simplest that is consistent with the data, it is not definitive for several reasons. First, the appearance signals measured in these experiments probe simultaneously many OH(v,J,Ω,Λ) states, which would tend to obfuscate differences in the appearance rate of specific rovibrational states. Second, only about half of the OH(v,J,Ω,Λ) states populated by this reaction could be probed by laser-induced fluorescence through the OH A←X band with our apparatus. Third, the cluster environment might influence the dynamics compared to the free bimolecular reaction.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 10
    Publication Date: 2002-06-01
    Description: The high degree of similarity between the mouse and human genomes is demonstrated through analysis of the sequence of mouse chromosome 16 (Mmu 16), which was obtained as part of a whole-genome shotgun assembly of the mouse genome. The mouse genome is about 10% smaller than the human genome, owing to a lower repetitive DNA content. Comparison of the structure and protein-coding potential of Mmu 16 with that of the homologous segments of the human genome identifies regions of conserved synteny with human chromosomes (Hsa) 3, 8, 12, 16, 21, and 22. Gene content and order are highly conserved between Mmu 16 and the syntenic blocks of the human genome. Of the 731 predicted genes on Mmu 16, 509 align with orthologs on the corresponding portions of the human genome, 44 are likely paralogous to these genes, and 164 genes have homologs elsewhere in the human genome; there are 14 genes for which we could find no human counterpart.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Mural, Richard J -- Adams, Mark D -- Myers, Eugene W -- Smith, Hamilton O -- Miklos, George L Gabor -- Wides, Ron -- Halpern, Aaron -- Li, Peter W -- Sutton, Granger G -- Nadeau, Joe -- Salzberg, Steven L -- Holt, Robert A -- Kodira, Chinnappa D -- Lu, Fu -- Chen, Lin -- Deng, Zuoming -- Evangelista, Carlos C -- Gan, Weiniu -- Heiman, Thomas J -- Li, Jiayin -- Li, Zhenya -- Merkulov, Gennady V -- Milshina, Natalia V -- Naik, Ashwinikumar K -- Qi, Rong -- Shue, Bixiong Chris -- Wang, Aihui -- Wang, Jian -- Wang, Xin -- Yan, Xianghe -- Ye, Jane -- Yooseph, Shibu -- Zhao, Qi -- Zheng, Liansheng -- Zhu, Shiaoping C -- Biddick, Kendra -- Bolanos, Randall -- Delcher, Arthur L -- Dew, Ian M -- Fasulo, Daniel -- Flanigan, Michael J -- Huson, Daniel H -- Kravitz, Saul A -- Miller, Jason R -- Mobarry, Clark M -- Reinert, Knut -- Remington, Karin A -- Zhang, Qing -- Zheng, Xiangqun H -- Nusskern, Deborah R -- Lai, Zhongwu -- Lei, Yiding -- Zhong, Wenyan -- Yao, Alison -- Guan, Ping -- Ji, Rui-Ru -- Gu, Zhiping -- Wang, Zhen-Yuan -- Zhong, Fei -- Xiao, Chunlin -- Chiang, Chia-Chien -- Yandell, Mark -- Wortman, Jennifer R -- Amanatides, Peter G -- Hladun, Suzanne L -- Pratts, Eric C -- Johnson, Jeffery E -- Dodson, Kristina L -- Woodford, Kerry J -- Evans, Cheryl A -- Gropman, Barry -- Rusch, Douglas B -- Venter, Eli -- Wang, Mei -- Smith, Thomas J -- Houck, Jarrett T -- Tompkins, Donald E -- Haynes, Charles -- Jacob, Debbie -- Chin, Soo H -- Allen, David R -- Dahlke, Carl E -- Sanders, Robert -- Li, Kelvin -- Liu, Xiangjun -- Levitsky, Alexander A -- Majoros, William H -- Chen, Quan -- Xia, Ashley C -- Lopez, John R -- Donnelly, Michael T -- Newman, Matthew H -- Glodek, Anna -- Kraft, Cheryl L -- Nodell, Marc -- Ali, Feroze -- An, Hui-Jin -- Baldwin-Pitts, Danita -- Beeson, Karen Y -- Cai, Shuang -- Carnes, Mark -- Carver, Amy -- Caulk, Parris M -- Center, Angela -- Chen, Yen-Hui -- Cheng, Ming-Lai -- Coyne, My D -- Crowder, Michelle -- Danaher, Steven -- Davenport, Lionel B -- Desilets, Raymond -- Dietz, Susanne M -- Doup, Lisa -- Dullaghan, Patrick -- Ferriera, Steven -- Fosler, Carl R -- Gire, Harold C -- Gluecksmann, Andres -- Gocayne, Jeannine D -- Gray, Jonathan -- Hart, Brit -- Haynes, Jason -- Hoover, Jeffery -- Howland, Tim -- Ibegwam, Chinyere -- Jalali, Mena -- Johns, David -- Kline, Leslie -- Ma, Daniel S -- MacCawley, Steven -- Magoon, Anand -- Mann, Felecia -- May, David -- McIntosh, Tina C -- Mehta, Somil -- Moy, Linda -- Moy, Mee C -- Murphy, Brian J -- Murphy, Sean D -- Nelson, Keith A -- Nuri, Zubeda -- Parker, Kimberly A -- Prudhomme, Alexandre C -- Puri, Vinita N -- Qureshi, Hina -- Raley, John C -- Reardon, Matthew S -- Regier, Megan A -- Rogers, Yu-Hui C -- Romblad, Deanna L -- Schutz, Jakob -- Scott, John L -- Scott, Richard -- Sitter, Cynthia D -- Smallwood, Michella -- Sprague, Arlan C -- Stewart, Erin -- Strong, Renee V -- Suh, Ellen -- Sylvester, Karena -- Thomas, Reginald -- Tint, Ni Ni -- Tsonis, Christopher -- Wang, Gary -- Wang, George -- Williams, Monica S -- Williams, Sherita M -- Windsor, Sandra M -- Wolfe, Keriellen -- Wu, Mitchell M -- Zaveri, Jayshree -- Chaturvedi, Kabir -- Gabrielian, Andrei E -- Ke, Zhaoxi -- Sun, Jingtao -- Subramanian, Gangadharan -- Venter, J Craig -- Pfannkoch, Cynthia M -- Barnstead, Mary -- Stephenson, Lisa D -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2002 May 31;296(5573):1661-71.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Celera Genomics, 45 West Gude Drive, Rockville, MD 20850, USA. richard.mural@celera.com〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12040188" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Base Composition ; Chromosomes/*genetics ; Chromosomes, Human/genetics ; Computational Biology ; Conserved Sequence ; Databases, Nucleic Acid ; Evolution, Molecular ; Genes ; Genetic Markers ; *Genome ; *Genome, Human ; Genomics ; Humans ; Mice ; Mice, Inbred A/genetics ; Mice, Inbred DBA/genetics ; Mice, Inbred Strains/*genetics ; Molecular Sequence Data ; Physical Chromosome Mapping ; Proteins/chemistry/genetics ; Sequence Alignment ; *Sequence Analysis, DNA ; Species Specificity ; *Synteny
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
Close ⊗
This website uses cookies and the analysis tool Matomo. More information can be found here...