ALBERT

All Library Books, journals and Electronic Records Telegrafenberg

feed icon rss

Your email was sent successfully. Check your inbox.

An error occurred while sending the email. Please try again.

Proceed reservation?

Export
  • 1
    Publication Date: 2019-02-01
    Description: The parameterization of sub-grid scale processes is one of the key challenges towards improved numerical simulations of the atmospheric and oceanic circulation. Numerical weather prediction models as well as climate models would benefit from more sophisticated turbulence closures that allow for less spurious dissipation at the grid-scale and consequently higher and more realistic levels of eddy kinetic energy (EKE). Recent studies propose to use a hyperviscous closure in combination with an additional deterministic forcing term as a negative viscosity to represent backscatter of energy from unresolved scales. The sub-grid EKE is introduced as an additional prognostic variable that is fed by dissipation at the grid scale, and enables recycling of EKE via the backscatter term at larger scales. This parameterization was previously shown to work well in zonally re-entrant channel configurations. Here, a generalization in the form of a Rossby number-dependent scaling for the strength of the backscatter is introduced to represent the emergence of a forward energy-cascade in unbalanced flows near the boundaries. We apply the parameterization to a shallow water model of a double gyre basin and provide evidence for its general applicability. In terms of mean state and variability, a low resolution model is considerably improved towards a high resolution control run at low additional computational cost.
    Type: Article , PeerReviewed , info:eu-repo/semantics/article
    Format: text
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 2
    Publication Date: 2017-07-13
    Description: The seasonal and spatial variation of the suspended sediment concentration (SSC) in the Yellow Sea and the East China Sea (YSECS) is studied using turbidity, temperature and velocity field data from all seasons of 2011. The important hydrodynamic factors affecting the SSC distribution are discussed, based on the field data. The data provide a picture of the seasonal evolution of the SSC in the YSECS in a single year. The results show that the highest surface layer SSC was measured in spring and winter, while the summer had the lowest surface layer SSC. In the bottom layer, the SSC distribution patterns were similar in all seasons except that a much higher SSC water plume extended from the Subei Shoal to the East China Sea shelf in winter survey. The vertical SSC gradient was stronger in the shallow water area than the deep water area, and it was stronger in summer and autumn than in winter and spring. We argue that wind-induced vertical mixing dominated the SSC distribution in the surface layer while the tidal currents played an important role in the bottom layer and sub-tidal currents dominated the horizontal pattern of the SSC distribution pattern over the shelf area. In particular, the presence of the summer thermocline limited the vertical mixing in summer, decreasing the SSC in the surface layer. The front between the East China Sea Coastal Current and the Taiwan Warm Current appears to prevent the high SSC water from being transported to the shelf. The sediment discharged by the Changjiang River was found to be concentrated in the estuary area and influenced the shelf SSC distribution only through the action of the subtidal currents.
    Type: Article , PeerReviewed
    Format: text
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 3
    Publication Date: 2019-01-23
    Description: Eden and Olbers have discussed the relationship between bottom pressure torque and bolus velocity in the western boundary current using the vertically truncated BARBI model approach. Here we revisit this issue using the much simpler residual mean framework. The central role played by a density equation that is linearised about a state of rest is discussed, as well as mechanisms required to maintain the baroclinicity of the western boundary current. We conclude that in the framework being considered by Eden and Olbers, frictional processes must play an important role in the western boundary current dynamics, otherwise the baroclinicity of the current is completely removed by the cross-front mixing effect of the eddies. We also derive the form of the Stommel equation obtained by Eden and Olbers in a manner which clarifies the approximations made by these authors. We argue that for their analysis to be valid, the flow must be concentrated in a shallow layer compared to the ocean depth, there must be no density structure at the sea floor, and any overturning circulation, whether directly wind-driven or as a part of the global thermohaline circulation, must be much smaller than the western boundary current transport.
    Type: Article , PeerReviewed
    Format: text
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 4
    Publication Date: 2019-09-23
    Description: Highlights: • North Atlantic sea surface temperature exhibits high decadal predictability potential. • Model bias hinders exploiting the decadal predictability potential. • An innovative method was developed to overcome some of the bias problem. • North Atlantic sea surface temperature will stay anomalously warm until about 2030. Abstract: The Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC), a major current system in the Atlantic Ocean, is thought to be an important driver of climate variability, both regionally and globally and on a large range of time scales from decadal to centennial and even longer. Measurements to monitor the AMOC strength have only started in 2004, which is too short to investigate its link to long-term climate variability. Here the surface heat flux-driven part of the AMOC during 1900–2010 is reconstructed from the history of the North Atlantic Oscillation, the most energetic mode of internal atmospheric variability in the Atlantic sector. The decadal variations of the AMOC obtained in that way are shown to precede the observed decadal variations in basin-wide North Atlantic sea surface temperature (SST), known as the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation (AMO) which strongly impacts societally important quantities such as Atlantic hurricane activity and Sahel rainfall. The future evolution of the AMO is forecast using the AMOC reconstructed up to 2010. The present warm phase of the AMO is predicted to continue until the end of the next decade, but with a negative tendency.
    Type: Article , PeerReviewed , info:eu-repo/semantics/article
    Format: text
    Format: text
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 5
    Publication Date: 2019-09-23
    Description: This paper develops an analysis framework to identify how physical processes, as represented in ocean climate models, impact the evolution of global mean sea level. The formulation utilizes the coarse grained equations appropriate for an ocean model, and starts from the vertically integrated mass conservation equation in its Lagrangian form. Global integration of this kinematic equation results in an evolution equation for global mean sea level that depends on two physical processes: boundary fluxes of mass and the non-Boussinesq steric effect. The non-Boussinesq steric effect itself contains contributions from boundary fluxes of buoyancy; interior buoyancy changes associated with parameterized subgrid scale processes; and motion across pressure surfaces. The non-Boussinesq steric effect can be diagnosed in either volume conserving Boussinesq or mass conserving non-Boussinesq ocean circulation models, with differences found to be negligible. We find that surface heating is the dominant term affecting sea level arising from buoyancy fluxes, contributing to a net positive tendency to global mean sea level, largely due to low latitude heating and because the thermal expansion coefficient is much larger in the tropics than high latitudes. Subgrid scale effects from parameterized quasi-Stokes transport, vertical diffusion, cabbeling, and thermobaricity are also found to be significant, each resulting in a reduction of global mean sea level. Sea level rise through low latitude heating is largely compensated by a sea level drop from poleward eddy heat transport and ocean mixing. Spatial variations in the thermal expansion coefficient provide an essential modulation of how physical effects from mixing and eddy induced advective transport impact global mean sea level. Highlights: ► Theoretical framework for how physical processes impact global mean sea level in ocean models. ► Mathematical and physical specification of the non-Boussinesq steric effect. ► How boundary buoyancy fluxes and interior processes impact global mean sea level. ► Global model examples of the non-Boussinesq steric effect with associated budget for global mean sea level.
    Type: Article , PeerReviewed
    Format: text
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 6
    Publication Date: 2019-09-23
    Description: Highlights: • Global mean sea level simulated in interannual CORE simulations. • Regional sea level patterns simulated in interannual CORE simulations. • Theoretical foundation for analysis of global mean sea level and regional patterns. Abstract: We provide an assessment of sea level simulated in a suite of global ocean-sea ice models using the interannual CORE atmospheric state to determine surface ocean boundary buoyancy and momentum fluxes. These CORE-II simulations are compared amongst themselves as well as to observation-based estimates. We focus on the final 15 years of the simulations (1993–2007), as this is a period where the CORE-II atmospheric state is well sampled, and it allows us to compare sea level related fields to both satellite and in situ analyses. The ensemble mean of the CORE-II simulations broadly agree with various global and regional observation-based analyses during this period, though with the global mean thermosteric sea level rise biased low relative to observation-based analyses. The simulations reveal a positive trend in dynamic sea level in the west Pacific and negative trend in the east, with this trend arising from wind shifts and regional changes in upper 700 m ocean heat content. The models also exhibit a thermosteric sea level rise in the subpolar North Atlantic associated with a transition around 1995/1996 of the North Atlantic Oscillation to its negative phase, and the advection of warm subtropical waters into the subpolar gyre. Sea level trends are predominantly associated with steric trends, with thermosteric effects generally far larger than halosteric effects, except in the Arctic and North Atlantic. There is a general anti-correlation between thermosteric and halosteric effects for much of the World Ocean, associated with density compensated changes.
    Type: Article , PeerReviewed , info:eu-repo/semantics/article
    Format: text
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
Close ⊗
This website uses cookies and the analysis tool Matomo. More information can be found here...