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  • 1
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    Copernicus
    In:  [Poster] In: EGU General Assembly 2011, 03.04.-08.04.2011, Vienna, Austria .
    Publication Date: 2012-07-06
    Description: EGU2011-13199 Images of crustal construction provide a key to understand the interplay of magmatism and tectonism while oceanic crust is build up. Bathymetric data show that the crustal construction is highly variable. Areas that are dominated by magmatic processes are adjacent to areas that are highly tectonised and where mantle rocks were found. The Mid-Atlantic Ridge at 22°N shows this high variability along the ridge axis, within the TAMMAR segment, and from segment to segment. However, this strong variability occurs also off-axis, spreading parallel, representing different times in the same area of the ridge. A fracture zone, with limited magma supply, has been replaced by a segment centre with a high magmatic budget. Roughly 4.5 million years ago, the growing magmatic active TAMMAR segment, propagated into the fracture zone, started the migration of the ridge offset to the south, and stopped the formation of core complexes. We present data from seismic refraction and wide-angle reflection profiles that surveyed the crustal structure across the ridge crest of the TAMMAR segment. These yield the crustal structure at the segment centre as a function of melt supply. The results suggest that crust is ~8 km thick near the ridge and decreases in thickness with offset to the ridge axis. Seismic layer 3 shows profound changes in thickness and becomes rapidly one kilometre thicker approx. 5 million years ago. This correlates with gravimetric data and the observed “Bull’s eye” anomaly in that region. Our observations support a temporal change from thick lithosphere with oceanic core complex formation to thin lithosphere with focussed mantle upwelling and segment growing. The formation of ‘thick-crust’ volcanic centre seems to have coincided with the onset of propagation 4.5 million years ago.
    Type: Conference or Workshop Item , NonPeerReviewed
    Format: text
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  • 2
    Publication Date: 2019-11-04
    Description: We present the implementation of Thomsen's weak anisotropy approximation for vertical transverse isotropy (VTI) media within TOMO3D, our code for 2-D and 3-D joint refraction and reflection travel-time tomographic inversion. In addition to the inversion of seismic P-wave velocity and reflector depth, the code can now retrieve models of Thomsen's parameters (δ and ε). Here, we test this new implementation following four different strategies on a canonical synthetic experiment in ideal conditions with the purpose of estimating the maximum capabilities and potential weak points of our modeling tool and strategies. First, we study the sensitivity of travel times to the presence of a 25 % anomaly in each of the parameters. Next, we invert for two combinations of parameters (v, δ, ε and v, δ, v⊥), following two inversion strategies, simultaneous and sequential, and compare the results to study their performance and discuss their advantages and disadvantages. Simultaneous inversion is the preferred strategy and the parameter combination (v, δ, ε) produces the best overall results. The only advantage of the parameter combination (v, δ, v⊥) is a better recovery of the magnitude of v. In each case, we derive the fourth parameter from the equation relating ε, v⊥ and v. Recovery of v, ε and v⊥ is satisfactory, whereas δ proves to be impossible to recover even in the most favorable scenario. However, this does not hinder the recovery of the other parameters, and we show that it is still possible to obtain a rough approximation of the δ distribution in the medium by sampling a reasonable range of homogeneous initial δ models and averaging the final δ models that are satisfactory in terms of data fit.
    Print ISSN: 1869-9510
    Electronic ISSN: 1869-9529
    Topics: Geosciences
    Published by Copernicus on behalf of European Geosciences Union (EGU).
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  • 3
    Publication Date: 2019-03-19
    Description: We present a high-resolution P-wave velocity model of the sedimentary cover and the uppermost basement until ~ 3 km depth obtained by full-waveform inversion of multichannel seismic data acquired with a 6 km-long streamer in the Alboran Sea (SE Iberia). The inherent non-linearity of the method, especially for short-offset, band-limited seismic data as this one, is circumvented by applying a data processing/modeling sequence consisting of three steps: (1) data re-datuming by back-propagation of the recorded seismograms to the seafloor; (2) joint refraction and reflection travel-time tomography combining the original and the re-datumed shot gathers; and (3) FWI of the original shot gathers using the model obtained by travel-time tomography as initial reference. The final velocity model shows a number of geological structures that cannot be identified in the travel-time tomography models or easily interpreted from seismic reflection images alone. A sharp strong velocity contrast accurately defines the geometry of the top of the basement. Several low-velocity zones that may correspond to the abrupt velocity change across steeply dipping normal faults are observed at the flanks of the basin. A 200–300 m thick, high-velocity layer embedded within lower velocity sediment may correspond to evaporites deposited during the Messinian crisis. The results confirm that the combination of data re-datuming and joint refraction and reflection travel-time inversion provides reference models that are accurate enough to apply full-waveform inversion to relatively short offset streamer data in deep water settings starting at field-data standard low frequency content of 6 Hz.
    Electronic ISSN: 1869-9537
    Topics: Geosciences
    Published by Copernicus on behalf of European Geosciences Union (EGU).
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  • 4
    Publication Date: 2019-03-13
    Description: We present the implementation of Thomsen's weak anisotropy approximation for VTI media within TOMO3D, our code for 2-D and 3-D joint refraction and reflection traveltime tomographic inversion. In addition to the inversion of seismic P-wave velocity and reflector depth, the code can now retrieve models of the Thomsen's parameters δ and ε. Here we test this new implementation following four different strategies on a canonical synthetic experiment. First, we study the sensitivity of traveltimes to the presence of a 25 % anomaly in each of the parameters. Next, we invert for two combinations of parameters, (v, δ, ε) and (v, δ, v⟂), following two inversion strategies, simultaneous and sequential, and compare the results to study their performances and discuss their advantages and disadvantages. Simultaneous inversion is the preferred strategy and the parameter combination (v, δ, ε) produces the best overall results. The only advantage of the parameter combination (v, δ, v⟂) is a better recovery of the magnitude of v. In each case we derive the fourth parameter from the equation relating ε, v⟂ and v. Recovery of v, ε and v⟂ is satisfactory whereas δ proves to be impossible to recover even in the most favorable scenario. However, this does not hinder the recovery of the other parameters, and we show that it is still possible to obtain a rough approximation of δ distribution in the medium by sampling a reasonable range of homogeneous initial δ models and averaging the final δ models that are satisfactory in terms of data fit.
    Electronic ISSN: 1869-9537
    Topics: Geosciences
    Published by Copernicus on behalf of European Geosciences Union (EGU).
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  • 5
    Publication Date: 2019-10-30
    Description: We present a high-resolution P-wave velocity model of the sedimentary cover and the uppermost basement to ∼3 km depth obtained by full-waveform inversion of multichannel seismic data acquired with a 6 km long streamer in the Alboran Sea (SE Iberia). The inherent non-linearity of the method, especially for short-offset, band-limited seismic data as this one, is circumvented by applying a data processing or modelling sequence consisting of three steps: (1) data re-datuming by back-propagation of the recorded seismograms to the seafloor; (2) joint refraction and reflection travel-time tomography combining the original and the re-datumed shot gathers; and (3) full-waveform inversion of the original shot gathers using the model obtained by travel-time tomography as initial reference. The final velocity model shows a number of geological structures that cannot be identified in the travel-time tomography models or easily interpreted from seismic reflection images alone. A sharp strong velocity contrast accurately defines the geometry of the top of the basement. Several low-velocity zones that may correspond to the abrupt velocity change across steeply dipping normal faults are observed at the flanks of the basin. A 200–300 m thick, high-velocity layer embedded within lower-velocity sediment may correspond to evaporites deposited during the Messinian crisis. The results confirm that the combination of data re-datuming and joint refraction and reflection travel-time inversion provides reference models that are accurate enough to apply full-waveform inversion to relatively short offset streamer data in deep-water settings starting at a field-data standard low-frequency content of 6 Hz.
    Print ISSN: 1869-9510
    Electronic ISSN: 1869-9529
    Topics: Geosciences
    Published by Copernicus on behalf of European Geosciences Union (EGU).
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
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  • 6
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