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  • 1
    Publication Date: 2007-05-05
    Description: The global endemic of cardiovascular diseases calls for improved risk assessment and treatment. Here, we describe an association between myocardial infarction (MI) and a common sequence variant on chromosome 9p21. This study included a total of 4587 cases and 12,767 controls. The identified variant, adjacent to the tumor suppressor genes CDKN2A and CDKN2B, was associated with the disease with high significance. Approximately 21% of individuals in the population are homozygous for this variant, and their estimated risk of suffering myocardial infarction is 1.64 times as great as that of noncarriers. The corresponding risk is 2.02 times as great for early-onset cases. The population attributable risk is 21% for MI in general and 31% for early-onset cases.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Helgadottir, Anna -- Thorleifsson, Gudmar -- Manolescu, Andrei -- Gretarsdottir, Solveig -- Blondal, Thorarinn -- Jonasdottir, Aslaug -- Jonasdottir, Adalbjorg -- Sigurdsson, Asgeir -- Baker, Adam -- Palsson, Arnar -- Masson, Gisli -- Gudbjartsson, Daniel F -- Magnusson, Kristinn P -- Andersen, Karl -- Levey, Allan I -- Backman, Valgerdur M -- Matthiasdottir, Sigurborg -- Jonsdottir, Thorbjorg -- Palsson, Stefan -- Einarsdottir, Helga -- Gunnarsdottir, Steinunn -- Gylfason, Arnaldur -- Vaccarino, Viola -- Hooper, W Craig -- Reilly, Muredach P -- Granger, Christopher B -- Austin, Harland -- Rader, Daniel J -- Shah, Svati H -- Quyyumi, Arshed A -- Gulcher, Jeffrey R -- Thorgeirsson, Gudmundur -- Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur -- Kong, Augustine -- Stefansson, Kari -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2007 Jun 8;316(5830):1491-3. Epub 2007 May 3.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉deCODE genetics, Sturlugata 8, IS-101 Reykjavik, Iceland.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17478679" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Age of Onset ; Aged ; Case-Control Studies ; Chromosome Mapping ; Chromosomes, Human, Pair 9/*genetics ; Coronary Artery Disease/genetics ; Female ; Genes, p16 ; *Genetic Predisposition to Disease ; *Genetic Variation ; Genotype ; Haplotypes ; Heterozygote ; Homozygote ; Humans ; Linkage Disequilibrium ; Male ; Middle Aged ; Myocardial Infarction/*genetics ; *Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide ; Risk Factors
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 2
    Publication Date: 2007-08-11
    Description: Glaucoma is a leading cause of irreversible blindness. A genome-wide search yielded multiple single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the 15q24.1 region associated with glaucoma. Further investigation revealed that the association is confined to exfoliation glaucoma (XFG). Two nonsynonymous SNPs in exon 1 of the gene LOXL1 explain the association, and the data suggest that they confer risk of XFG mainly through exfoliation syndrome (XFS). About 25% of the general population is homozygous for the highest-risk haplotype, and their risk of suffering from XFG is more than 100 times that of individuals carrying only low-risk haplotypes. The population-attributable risk is more than 99%. The product of LOXL1 catalyzes the formation of elastin fibers found to be a major component of the lesions in XFG.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Thorleifsson, Gudmar -- Magnusson, Kristinn P -- Sulem, Patrick -- Walters, G Bragi -- Gudbjartsson, Daniel F -- Stefansson, Hreinn -- Jonsson, Thorlakur -- Jonasdottir, Adalbjorg -- Jonasdottir, Aslaug -- Stefansdottir, Gerdur -- Masson, Gisli -- Hardarson, Gudmundur A -- Petursson, Hjorvar -- Arnarsson, Arsaell -- Motallebipour, Mehdi -- Wallerman, Ola -- Wadelius, Claes -- Gulcher, Jeffrey R -- Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur -- Kong, Augustine -- Jonasson, Fridbert -- Stefansson, Kari -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2007 Sep 7;317(5843):1397-400. Epub 2007 Aug 9.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉deCODE genetics Inc, 101 Reykjavik, Iceland.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17690259" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Adipose Tissue/metabolism ; Amino Acid Oxidoreductases/*genetics ; Case-Control Studies ; Chi-Square Distribution ; Exfoliation Syndrome/*genetics ; Female ; Gene Expression ; *Genetic Predisposition to Disease ; Genotype ; Glaucoma/*genetics ; Glaucoma, Open-Angle/genetics ; Humans ; Iceland ; Male ; Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 3
    Publication Date: 2008-02-02
    Description: The genome-wide recombination rate varies between individuals, but the mechanism controlling this variation in humans has remained elusive. A genome-wide search identified sequence variants in the 4p16.3 region correlated with recombination rate in both males and females. These variants are located in the RNF212 gene, a putative ortholog of the ZHP-3 gene that is essential for recombinations and chiasma formation in Caenorhabditis elegans. It is noteworthy that the haplotype formed by two single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with the highest recombination rate in males is associated with a low recombination rate in females. Consequently, if the frequency of the haplotype changes, the average recombination rate will increase for one sex and decrease for the other, but the sex-averaged recombination rate of the population can stay relatively constant.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Kong, Augustine -- Thorleifsson, Gudmar -- Stefansson, Hreinn -- Masson, Gisli -- Helgason, Agnar -- Gudbjartsson, Daniel F -- Jonsdottir, Gudrun M -- Gudjonsson, Sigurjon A -- Sverrisson, Sverrir -- Thorlacius, Theodora -- Jonasdottir, Aslaug -- Hardarson, Gudmundur A -- Palsson, Stefan T -- Frigge, Michael L -- Gulcher, Jeffrey R -- Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur -- Stefansson, Kari -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2008 Mar 7;319(5868):1398-401. doi: 10.1126/science.1152422. Epub 2008 Jan 31.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉deCODE Genetics Inc, 101 Reykjavik, Iceland. kong@decode.is〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18239089" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Alleles ; Chromosomes, Human, Pair 4/*genetics ; Fathers ; Female ; *Genome, Human ; Haplotypes ; Humans ; Linkage Disequilibrium ; Male ; Meiosis ; Molecular Sequence Data ; Mothers ; Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide ; *Recombination, Genetic ; Sex Characteristics ; Synaptonemal Complex/metabolism ; Ubiquitin-Protein Ligases/*genetics
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 4
    Publication Date: 2018-01-26
    Description: Sequence variants in the parental genomes that are not transmitted to a child (the proband) are often ignored in genetic studies. Here we show that nontransmitted alleles can affect a child through their impacts on the parents and other relatives, a phenomenon we call "genetic nurture." Using results from a meta-analysis of educational attainment, we find that the polygenic score computed for the nontransmitted alleles of 21,637 probands with at least one parent genotyped has an estimated effect on the educational attainment of the proband that is 29.9% ( P = 1.6 x 10 –14 ) of that of the transmitted polygenic score. Genetic nurturing effects of this polygenic score extend to other traits. Paternal and maternal polygenic scores have similar effects on educational attainment, but mothers contribute more than fathers to nutrition- and heath-related traits.
    Keywords: Genetics
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Geosciences , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 5
    Publication Date: 2019
    Description: 〈p〉Genetic diversity arises from recombination and de novo mutation (DNM). Using a combination of microarray genotype and whole-genome sequence data on parent-child pairs, we identified 4,531,535 crossover recombinations and 200,435 DNMs. The resulting genetic map has a resolution of 682 base pairs. Crossovers exhibit a mutagenic effect, with overrepresentation of DNMs within 1 kilobase of crossovers in males and females. In females, a higher mutation rate is observed up to 40 kilobases from crossovers, particularly for complex crossovers, which increase with maternal age. We identified 35 loci associated with the recombination rate or the location of crossovers, demonstrating extensive genetic control of meiotic recombination, and our results highlight genes linked to the formation of the synaptonemal complex as determinants of crossovers.〈/p〉
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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