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  • 1
    Publication Date: 1982-11-26
    Description: The two sex determining sperm populations of the vole Microtus oregoni were separated according to DNA content by use of flow sorting instrumentation. Although the sperm were not viable, they should be useful for addressing the question of haploid expression of genes linked to sex chromosomes and for efficiently searching for biochemical markers that differentiate the two populations.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Pinkel, D -- Gledhill, B L -- Lake, S -- Stephenson, D -- Van Dilla, M A -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 1982 Nov 26;218(4575):904-6.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/6753153" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Arvicolinae/genetics ; DNA/analysis ; Flow Cytometry/methods ; Fluorescent Dyes ; Male ; Sex Chromosomes/ultrastructure ; *Sex Determination Analysis ; Spermatozoa/*physiology
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 2
    Publication Date: 2004-08-25
    Description: Intracellular acidification of skeletal muscles is commonly thought to contribute to muscle fatigue. However, intracellular acidosis also acts to preserve muscle excitability when muscles become depolarized, which occurs with working muscles. Here, we show that this process may be mediated by decreased chloride permeability, which enables action potentials to still be propagated along the internal network of tubules in a muscle fiber (the T system) despite muscle depolarization. These results implicate chloride ion channels in muscle function and emphasize that intracellular acidosis of muscle has protective effects during muscle fatigue.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Pedersen, Thomas H -- Nielsen, Ole B -- Lamb, Graham D -- Stephenson, D George -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2004 Aug 20;305(5687):1144-7.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Physiology, University of Aarhus, DK-8000, Denmark.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15326352" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Action Potentials ; Animals ; Calcium/metabolism ; Chloride Channels/*metabolism ; Chlorides/metabolism ; Electric Stimulation ; Hydrogen-Ion Concentration ; In Vitro Techniques ; Lactic Acid/metabolism ; Membrane Potentials ; Muscle Contraction ; *Muscle Fatigue ; Muscle Fibers, Skeletal/metabolism/*physiology ; Muscle, Skeletal/metabolism/*physiology ; Permeability ; Potassium/metabolism ; Rats ; Sarcoplasmic Reticulum/metabolism
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 3
    Publication Date: 2004-11-30
    Description: The widespread extinctions of large mammals at the end of the Pleistocene epoch have often been attributed to the depredations of humans; here we present genetic evidence that questions this assumption. We used ancient DNA and Bayesian techniques to reconstruct a detailed genetic history of bison throughout the late Pleistocene and Holocene epochs. Our analyses depict a large diverse population living throughout Beringia until around 37,000 years before the present, when the population's genetic diversity began to decline dramatically. The timing of this decline correlates with environmental changes associated with the onset of the last glacial cycle, whereas archaeological evidence does not support the presence of large populations of humans in Eastern Beringia until more than 15,000 years later.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Shapiro, Beth -- Drummond, Alexei J -- Rambaut, Andrew -- Wilson, Michael C -- Matheus, Paul E -- Sher, Andrei V -- Pybus, Oliver G -- Gilbert, M Thomas P -- Barnes, Ian -- Binladen, Jonas -- Willerslev, Eske -- Hansen, Anders J -- Baryshnikov, Gennady F -- Burns, James A -- Davydov, Sergei -- Driver, Jonathan C -- Froese, Duane G -- Harington, C Richard -- Keddie, Grant -- Kosintsev, Pavel -- Kunz, Michael L -- Martin, Larry D -- Stephenson, Robert O -- Storer, John -- Tedford, Richard -- Zimov, Sergei -- Cooper, Alan -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2004 Nov 26;306(5701):1561-5.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Henry Wellcome Ancient Biomolecules Centre, Oxford University, South Parks Road, Oxford OX13PS, UK.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15567864" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Alaska ; Animals ; Bayes Theorem ; *Bison/classification/genetics ; Canada ; China ; *Climate ; DNA, Mitochondrial/genetics ; Environment ; *Fossils ; Genetic Variation ; Genetics, Population ; Human Activities ; Humans ; North America ; Phylogeny ; Population Dynamics ; Sequence Analysis, DNA ; Time
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 4
    Publication Date: 2002-06-01
    Description: The high degree of similarity between the mouse and human genomes is demonstrated through analysis of the sequence of mouse chromosome 16 (Mmu 16), which was obtained as part of a whole-genome shotgun assembly of the mouse genome. The mouse genome is about 10% smaller than the human genome, owing to a lower repetitive DNA content. Comparison of the structure and protein-coding potential of Mmu 16 with that of the homologous segments of the human genome identifies regions of conserved synteny with human chromosomes (Hsa) 3, 8, 12, 16, 21, and 22. Gene content and order are highly conserved between Mmu 16 and the syntenic blocks of the human genome. Of the 731 predicted genes on Mmu 16, 509 align with orthologs on the corresponding portions of the human genome, 44 are likely paralogous to these genes, and 164 genes have homologs elsewhere in the human genome; there are 14 genes for which we could find no human counterpart.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Mural, Richard J -- Adams, Mark D -- Myers, Eugene W -- Smith, Hamilton O -- Miklos, George L Gabor -- Wides, Ron -- Halpern, Aaron -- Li, Peter W -- Sutton, Granger G -- Nadeau, Joe -- Salzberg, Steven L -- Holt, Robert A -- Kodira, Chinnappa D -- Lu, Fu -- Chen, Lin -- Deng, Zuoming -- Evangelista, Carlos C -- Gan, Weiniu -- Heiman, Thomas J -- Li, Jiayin -- Li, Zhenya -- Merkulov, Gennady V -- Milshina, Natalia V -- Naik, Ashwinikumar K -- Qi, Rong -- Shue, Bixiong Chris -- Wang, Aihui -- Wang, Jian -- Wang, Xin -- Yan, Xianghe -- Ye, Jane -- Yooseph, Shibu -- Zhao, Qi -- Zheng, Liansheng -- Zhu, Shiaoping C -- Biddick, Kendra -- Bolanos, Randall -- Delcher, Arthur L -- Dew, Ian M -- Fasulo, Daniel -- Flanigan, Michael J -- Huson, Daniel H -- Kravitz, Saul A -- Miller, Jason R -- Mobarry, Clark M -- Reinert, Knut -- Remington, Karin A -- Zhang, Qing -- Zheng, Xiangqun H -- Nusskern, Deborah R -- Lai, Zhongwu -- Lei, Yiding -- Zhong, Wenyan -- Yao, Alison -- Guan, Ping -- Ji, Rui-Ru -- Gu, Zhiping -- Wang, Zhen-Yuan -- Zhong, Fei -- Xiao, Chunlin -- Chiang, Chia-Chien -- Yandell, Mark -- Wortman, Jennifer R -- Amanatides, Peter G -- Hladun, Suzanne L -- Pratts, Eric C -- Johnson, Jeffery E -- Dodson, Kristina L -- Woodford, Kerry J -- Evans, Cheryl A -- Gropman, Barry -- Rusch, Douglas B -- Venter, Eli -- Wang, Mei -- Smith, Thomas J -- Houck, Jarrett T -- Tompkins, Donald E -- Haynes, Charles -- Jacob, Debbie -- Chin, Soo H -- Allen, David R -- Dahlke, Carl E -- Sanders, Robert -- Li, Kelvin -- Liu, Xiangjun -- Levitsky, Alexander A -- Majoros, William H -- Chen, Quan -- Xia, Ashley C -- Lopez, John R -- Donnelly, Michael T -- Newman, Matthew H -- Glodek, Anna -- Kraft, Cheryl L -- Nodell, Marc -- Ali, Feroze -- An, Hui-Jin -- Baldwin-Pitts, Danita -- Beeson, Karen Y -- Cai, Shuang -- Carnes, Mark -- Carver, Amy -- Caulk, Parris M -- Center, Angela -- Chen, Yen-Hui -- Cheng, Ming-Lai -- Coyne, My D -- Crowder, Michelle -- Danaher, Steven -- Davenport, Lionel B -- Desilets, Raymond -- Dietz, Susanne M -- Doup, Lisa -- Dullaghan, Patrick -- Ferriera, Steven -- Fosler, Carl R -- Gire, Harold C -- Gluecksmann, Andres -- Gocayne, Jeannine D -- Gray, Jonathan -- Hart, Brit -- Haynes, Jason -- Hoover, Jeffery -- Howland, Tim -- Ibegwam, Chinyere -- Jalali, Mena -- Johns, David -- Kline, Leslie -- Ma, Daniel S -- MacCawley, Steven -- Magoon, Anand -- Mann, Felecia -- May, David -- McIntosh, Tina C -- Mehta, Somil -- Moy, Linda -- Moy, Mee C -- Murphy, Brian J -- Murphy, Sean D -- Nelson, Keith A -- Nuri, Zubeda -- Parker, Kimberly A -- Prudhomme, Alexandre C -- Puri, Vinita N -- Qureshi, Hina -- Raley, John C -- Reardon, Matthew S -- Regier, Megan A -- Rogers, Yu-Hui C -- Romblad, Deanna L -- Schutz, Jakob -- Scott, John L -- Scott, Richard -- Sitter, Cynthia D -- Smallwood, Michella -- Sprague, Arlan C -- Stewart, Erin -- Strong, Renee V -- Suh, Ellen -- Sylvester, Karena -- Thomas, Reginald -- Tint, Ni Ni -- Tsonis, Christopher -- Wang, Gary -- Wang, George -- Williams, Monica S -- Williams, Sherita M -- Windsor, Sandra M -- Wolfe, Keriellen -- Wu, Mitchell M -- Zaveri, Jayshree -- Chaturvedi, Kabir -- Gabrielian, Andrei E -- Ke, Zhaoxi -- Sun, Jingtao -- Subramanian, Gangadharan -- Venter, J Craig -- Pfannkoch, Cynthia M -- Barnstead, Mary -- Stephenson, Lisa D -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2002 May 31;296(5573):1661-71.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Celera Genomics, 45 West Gude Drive, Rockville, MD 20850, USA. richard.mural@celera.com〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12040188" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Base Composition ; Chromosomes/*genetics ; Chromosomes, Human/genetics ; Computational Biology ; Conserved Sequence ; Databases, Nucleic Acid ; Evolution, Molecular ; Genes ; Genetic Markers ; *Genome ; *Genome, Human ; Genomics ; Humans ; Mice ; Mice, Inbred A/genetics ; Mice, Inbred DBA/genetics ; Mice, Inbred Strains/*genetics ; Molecular Sequence Data ; Physical Chromosome Mapping ; Proteins/chemistry/genetics ; Sequence Alignment ; *Sequence Analysis, DNA ; Species Specificity ; *Synteny
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 5
    Publication Date: 1982-05-21
    Description: Rat embryo fibroblasts transformed by Abelson murine leukemia virus (MuLV) produce and release a transforming growth factor (TGF). Production of this factor is correlated with a tyrosine-specific protein kinase that is functionally active and is associated with the major Abelson MuLV gene product, P120. Transformation-defective mutants of Abelson MuLV do not transform cells, do not have their virus coded transforming gene product phosphorylated in tyrosine, and do not induce TGF production. Abelson MuLV-induced TGF morphologically transforms cells in culture, competes with 125I-labeled epidermal growth factor (EGF) for binding to cell receptors, and induces phosphorylation of tyrosine acceptor sites in the 160,000-dalton EGF membrane receptor. After purification to homogeneity, Abelson virus-induced TGF migrates as a single polypeptide with an apparent size of 7400 daltons as determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Twardzik, D R -- Todaro, G J -- Marquardt, H -- Reynolds, F H Jr -- Stephenson, J R -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 1982 May 21;216(4548):894-7.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/6177040" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Abelson murine leukemia virus ; Animals ; *Cell Transformation, Neoplastic ; *Cell Transformation, Viral ; Molecular Weight ; Peptides/*metabolism ; Phosphotyrosine ; Rats ; Receptor, Epidermal Growth Factor ; Receptors, Cell Surface/metabolism ; Transforming Growth Factors ; Tyrosine/analogs & derivatives/metabolism
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 6
    Publication Date: 1984-11-30
    Description: 〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Wickens, M -- Stephenson, P -- R-R01-GM31892-02/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 1984 Nov 30;226(4678):1045-51.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/6208611" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Base Sequence ; Female ; Genes, Viral ; *Mutation ; Nucleic Acid Hybridization ; Oocytes/metabolism ; Poly A/genetics ; RNA/genetics ; RNA, Messenger/*genetics ; Simian virus 40/*genetics ; Transcription, Genetic
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 7
    Publication Date: 1982-06-04
    Description: To define the human homolog (or homologs) of transforming sequences (v-fes gene) common to Gardner (GA) and Snyder Theilen (ST) isolates of feline sarcoma virus (FeSV), a representative library of human lung carcinoma DNA in a cosmid vector system was constructed. Three cosmid clones were isolated containing GA/ST FeSV v-fes homologous cellular sequences, within 32- to 42-kilobase cellular inserts representing 56 kilobases of contiguous human cellular DNA. Sequences both homologous to, and colinear with, GA or ST FeSV v-fes are distributed discontinuously over a region of up to 9.5 kilobases and contain a minimum of three regions of nonhomology representing probable introns. A thymidine kinase selection system was used to show that, upon transfection to RAT-2 cells, the human c-fes sequence lacked detectable transforming activity.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Groffen, J -- Heisterkamp, N -- Grosveld, F -- Van de Ven, W -- Stephenson, J R -- N0I-CO-75380/CO/NCI NIH HHS/ -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 1982 Jun 4;216(4550):1136-8.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/6281890" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Bacteriophage lambda/genetics ; *Cell Transformation, Viral ; Cloning, Molecular/methods ; DNA Restriction Enzymes ; DNA, Recombinant ; Escherichia coli/genetics ; *Genes, Viral ; Humans ; Retroviridae/*genetics
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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