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  • 2000-2004  (2)
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  • 1
    Publication Date: 2003-03-01
    Description:  Operating an FG-5 absolute gravimeter in a helium atmosphere should reduce the noise that is caused by vibrations of the air–vacuum interface where the interferometer laser beam enters and leaves the vacuum dropping chamber. The helium atmosphere will decrease the change in refractivity across the interface by up to 88% over the value in air, depending on the purity of the helium. A marked reduction in the post-fit residuals is observed at frequencies of about 50 Hz and little or no effect at higher frequencies. A qualitative explanation of the frequency cutoff in terms of motion of air under compression is developed. Further experiments to measure and characterize the effects of the vibrations are planned. ©2003 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg
    Print ISSN: 0949-7714
    Electronic ISSN: 1432-1394
    Topics: Architecture, Civil Engineering, Surveying , Geosciences
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  • 2
    Publication Date: 2001-03-26
    Description:  The gravitational attractions of terrestrial masses and condensed terrestrial masses were modeled in local regions of gravity stations in different ways. These differences in the models included the type of coordinate frame (Cartesian versus spherical), grid spacing (30 vs 3 arcseconds), and the shape of the terrain (“flat-topped” vs “sloped-topped” prisms). The effect of each of these variables is quantified for its overall impact on Helmert gravity anomalies. The combined effect of removing the masses and restoring the condensed masses is also compared to classical terrain corrections for suitability in computing Helmert anomalies. Some detailed conclusions are drawn from these test computations. The effect of the Earth's curvature has both a near-field effect (due to the differences in volume and shape between rectangular and spherical prisms) and a far-field effect (due to physical location of masses below the horizon). The near-field effect can achieve 0.4 mGal in the Rocky mountains, and affect the geoid by up to 7.5 cm. Additionally, the approximation of the terrain by flat-topped prisms (even at fine spacings such as 3 arcseconds) is inappropriate for terrain near the station, where errors of 20 mGal have been computed using 30-arcsecond data. It is concluded that when 30-arcsecond terrain is allowed to have a more curved (bilinear) prism top, its gravitational attraction is a significantly closer approximation of 3-arcsecond terrain, even for the prism surrounding the station, as compared to the case of 30-arcsecond flat-topped prisms. It is suggested that classical terrain corrections, for many reasons, should not be used to compute Helmert anomalies. Considering only the accuracy, and not the speed, of the computations, the following conclusions are drawn: terrain effects computed inside a local “cap” should be done exclusively in spherical coordinates with a 3-arcsecond Digital Elevation Model (DEM) out to 0.2∘ radius, and then a 30-arcsecond DEM from 0.2 out to 3.5∘. In all cases, bilinearly shaped prism tops should be used. ©2001 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg
    Print ISSN: 0949-7714
    Electronic ISSN: 1432-1394
    Topics: Architecture, Civil Engineering, Surveying , Geosciences
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
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