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  • 2000-2004  (130)
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Year
  • 1
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    In:  Geophys. Res. Lett., Colorado Springs, US Air Force Academy, vol. 27, no. 10, pp. 1535-1538, pp. L12S08, (ISSN: 1340-4202)
    Publication Date: 2000
    Description: Nagao et al. monitor the geoelectric potential difference between pairs of electrodes (or dipoles) buried at about 2 m depth at several stations in Japan for the purpose of observing co-seismic signals. Studying several recent earthquakes, they report that the signals commence not with the origin time of the earthquakes but with the arrival time of seismic waves. They find two types of co-seismic changes: offset/decay type, which last long after the seismic vibrations cease, and oscillatory type, which decay with the seismic vibrations. They also find that the amplitude of the co-seismic signals does not scale with the dipole length. Also in this issue, Hayakawa et al. [1531] investigate ultra low frequency (ULF) electromagnetic emissions associated with a large earthquake that occurred at Biak Island, Indonesia, in February 1996. Examining data from Biak and Darwin, they find that the ULF emissions observed about 1.5 months before the quake serve as a precursory signature of the earthquake.
    Keywords: Earthquake ; Electromagnetic methods/phenomena ; 0699 ; Electromagnetics ; General ; or ; miscellaneous ; 7223 ; Seismology ; Seismic ; hazard ; assessment ; and ; prediction ; 9320 ; Information ; related ; to ; geographic ; region ; Asia ; 9810 ; General ; or ; miscellaneous ; New ; fields ; (not ; classifiable ; under ; other ; headings) ; GRL
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  • 2
    Publication Date: 2013-10-17
    Type: http://purl.org/eprint/type/ConferencePaper
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  • 3
    Publication Date: 2000-08-01
    Description: An artificial crystal structure has been fabricated exhibiting a full three-dimensional photonic bandgap effect at optical communication wavelengths. The photonic crystal was constructed by stacking 0.7-micrometer period semiconductor stripes with the accuracy of 30 nanometers by advanced wafer-fusion technique. A bandgap effect of more than 40 decibels (which corresponds to 99.99% reflection) was successfully achieved. The result encourages us to create an ultra-small optical integrated circuit including a three-dimensional photonic crystal waveguide with a sharp bend.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Noda -- Tomoda -- Yamamoto -- Chutinan -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2000 Jul 28;289(5479):604-6.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Electronic Science and Engineering, Kyoto University, Yoshida-honmachi, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8501, Japan. Electrotechnical Laboratory, Agency of Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Ministry of International Trade and Industry (〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10915619" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 4
    Publication Date: 2004-06-05
    Description: Three-dimensional (3D) photonic crystals containing artificial point defects have been fabricated to emit light at optical communications wavelengths. They were constructed by stacking 0.7-micrometer-period gallium arsenide striped layers, resulting in a 3D "woodpile" photonic crystal. Indium-gallium arsenide-phosphide quantum-well layers emitting at a wavelength of 1.55 micrometers were incorporated in the center of the crystal. Samples having up to nine stacked layers were constructed, and artificial point-defect cavities of different sizes were formed in the light-emitting layer. Light emission was suppressed in the photonic crystal regions, whereas cavity modes were successfully observed at the point defects and were size dependent.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Ogawa, Shinpei -- Imada, Masahiro -- Yoshimoto, Susumu -- Okano, Makoto -- Noda, Susumu -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2004 Jul 9;305(5681):227-9. Epub 2004 Jun 3.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Electronic Science and Engineering, Kyoto University, Kyoto 615-8510, Japan.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15178750" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 5
    Publication Date: 2001-07-07
    Description: In the visual system, the establishment of the anteroposterior and dorsoventral axes in the retina and tectum during development is important for topographic retinotectal projection. We identified chick Ventroptin, an antagonist of bone morphogenetic protein 4 (BMP-4), which is mainly expressed in the ventral retina, not only with a ventral high-dorsal low gradient but also with a nasal high-temporal low gradient at later stages. Misexpression of Ventroptin altered expression patterns of several topographic genes in the retina and projection of the retinal axons to the tectum along both axes. Thus, the topographic retinotectal projection appears to be specified by the double-gradient molecule Ventroptin along the two axes.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Sakuta, H -- Suzuki, R -- Takahashi, H -- Kato, A -- Shintani, T -- Iemura Si -- Yamamoto, T S -- Ueno, N -- Noda, M -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2001 Jul 6;293(5527):111-5.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Division of Molecular Neurobiology, National Institute for Basic Biology, The Graduate University for Advanced Studies, 38 Nishigonaka, Myodaiji-cho, Okazaki 444-8585, Japan.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11441185" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Alternative Splicing ; Amino Acid Sequence ; Animals ; Bone Morphogenetic Protein 4 ; Bone Morphogenetic Proteins/*antagonists & inhibitors/genetics/metabolism ; Chick Embryo ; Cloning, Molecular ; Electroporation ; Embryo, Nonmammalian/cytology/metabolism ; Eye Proteins/chemistry/genetics/*metabolism ; *Gene Expression Regulation, Developmental ; Gene Library ; Humans ; In Situ Hybridization ; Mice ; Microinjections ; Molecular Sequence Data ; *Morphogenesis ; Nerve Tissue Proteins ; Precipitin Tests ; Protein Binding ; Protein Isoforms/chemistry/genetics/metabolism ; RNA, Messenger/analysis/genetics ; Retina/*embryology/*metabolism ; Sequence Alignment ; Surface Plasmon Resonance ; Xenopus Proteins ; Xenopus laevis/embryology/metabolism
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 6
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    Unknown
    American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS)
    Publication Date: 2003-06-07
    Description: 〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Song, Bong-Shik -- Noda, Susumu -- Asano, Takashi -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2003 Jun 6;300(5625):1537.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Electronic Science and Engineering, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8501, Japan.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12791984" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 7
    Publication Date: 2001-08-11
    Description: We demonstrate polarization mode selection in a two-dimensional (2D) photonic crystal laser by controlling the geometry of the unit cell structure. As the band diagram of the square-lattice photonic crystal is influenced by the unit cell structure, calculations reveal that changing the structure from a circular to an elliptical geometry should result in a strong modification of the electromagnetic field distributions at the band edges. Such a structural modification is expected to provide a mechanism for controlling the polarization modes of the emitted light. A square-lattice photonic crystal with the elliptical unit cell structure has been fabricated and integrated with a gain media. The observed coherent 2D lasing action with a single wavelength and controlled polarization is in good agreement with the predicted behavior.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Noda, S -- Yokoyama, M -- Imada, M -- Chutinan, A -- Mochizuki, M -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2001 Aug 10;293(5532):1123-5.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Electronic Science and Engineering, Kyoto University, Yoshida-honmachi, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8501, Japan. snoda@kuee.kyoto-u.ac.jp〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11498586" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 8
    Publication Date: 2004-08-31
    Description: Observations of the gravitational microlensing event MOA 2003-BLG-32/OGLE 2003-BLG-219 are presented, for which the peak magnification was over 500, the highest yet reported. Continuous observations around the peak enabled a sensitive search for planets orbiting the lens star. No planets were detected. Planets 1.3 times heavier than Earth were excluded from more than 50% of the projected annular region from approximately 2.3 to 3.6 astronomical units surrounding the lens star, Uranus-mass planets were excluded from 0.9 to 8.7 astronomical units, and planets 1.3 times heavier than Saturn were excluded from 0.2 to 60 astronomical units. These are the largest regions of sensitivity yet achieved in searches for extrasolar planets orbiting any star.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Abe, F -- Bennett, D P -- Bond, I A -- Eguchi, S -- Furuta, Y -- Hearnshaw, J B -- Kamiya, K -- Kilmartin, P M -- Kurata, Y -- Masuda, K -- Matsubara, Y -- Muraki, Y -- Noda, S -- Okajima, K -- Rakich, A -- Rattenbury, N J -- Sako, T -- Sekiguchi, T -- Sullivan, D J -- Sumi, T -- Tristram, P J -- Yanagisawa, T -- Yock, P C M -- Gal-Yam, A -- Lipkin, Y -- Maoz, D -- Ofek, E O -- Udalski, A -- Szewczyk, O -- Zebrun, K -- Soszynski, I -- Szymanski, M K -- Kubiak, M -- Pietrzynski, G -- Wyrzykowski, L -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2004 Aug 27;305(5688):1264-6.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Solar Terrestrial Environment Laboratory, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-01, Japan.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15333833" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 9
    Publication Date: 2000-10-04
    Description: We examine the seasonal cycle of near-surface air temperature simulated by 17 coupled ocean-atmosphere general circulation models participating in the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP). Nine of the models use ad hoc “flux adjustment” at the ocean surface to bring model simulations close to observations of the present-day climate. We group flux-adjusted and non-flux-adjusted models separately and examine the behavior of each class. When averaged over all of the flux-adjusted model simulations, near-surface air temperature falls within 2 K of observed values over the oceans. The corresponding average over non-flux-adjusted models shows errors up to ∼6 K in extensive ocean areas. Flux adjustments are not directly applied over land, and near-surface land temperature errors are substantial in the average over flux-adjusted models, which systematically underestimates (by ∼5 K) temperature in areas of elevated terrain. The corresponding average over non-flux-adjusted models forms a similar error pattern (with somewhat increased amplitude) over land. We use the temperature difference between July and January to measure seasonal cycle amplitude. Zonal means of this quantity from the individual flux-adjusted models form a fairly tight cluster (all within ∼30% of the mean) centered on the observed values. The non-flux-adjusted models perform nearly as well at most latitudes. In Southern Ocean mid-latitudes, however, the non-flux-adjusted models overestimate the magnitude of January-minus-July temperature differences by ∼5 K due to an overestimate of summer (January) near-surface temperature. This error is common to five of the eight non-flux-adjusted models. Also, over Northern Hemisphere mid-latitude land areas, zonal mean differences between July and January temperatures simulated by the non-flux-adjusted models show a greater spread (positive and negative) about observed values than results from the flux-adjusted models. Elsewhere, differences between the two classes of models are less obvious. At no latitude is the zonal mean difference between averages over the two classes of models greater than the standard deviation over models. The ability of coupled GCMs to simulate a reasonable seasonal cycle is a necessary condition for confidence in their prediction of long-term climatic changes (such as global warming), but it is not a sufficient condition unless the seasonal cycle and long-term changes involve similar climatic processes. To test this possible connection, we compare seasonal cycle amplitude with equilibrium warming under doubled atmospheric carbon dioxide for the models in our data base. A small but positive correlation exists between these two quantities. This result is predicted by a simple conceptual model of the climate system, and it is consistent with other modeling experience, which indicates that the seasonal cycle depends only weakly on climate sensitivity. ©2000 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg
    Print ISSN: 0930-7575
    Electronic ISSN: 1432-0894
    Topics: Geosciences , Physics
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  • 10
    ISSN: 1432-0878
    Keywords: Class II MHC-positive cells Dental pulp ED1 OX6 PAS reaction PGP 9.5 Tooth replantation Rat (Wistar)
    Source: Springer Online Journal Archives 1860-2000
    Topics: Biology , Medicine
    Notes: Abstract. Responses of immunocompetent cells to tooth replantation during the regeneration process of the dental pulp in rat molars were investigated by immunocytochemistry using antibodies to class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules (OX6 antibody), monocyte/macrophage lineage cells (ED1 antibody) and protein gene product 9.5 (PGP 9.5), as well as by histochemical reaction for periodic acid-Schiff (PAS). Tooth replantation caused an increase in both the number of OX6- and ED1-positive cells and their immunointensity in the replanted pulp, but almost all PGP 9.5-immunoreactive nerves diminished in the initial stages. By postoperative day 3, many OX6- and ED1-immunopositive cells had accumulated along the pulp-dentin border to extend their cytoplasmic processes into the dentinal tubules in successful cases. Once reparative dentin formation had begun after postoperative day 7, OX6- and ED1-immmunopositive cells became scattered in the odontoblast layer, while reinnervation was found in the coronal pulp. The temporal appearance of these immunocompetent cells at the pulp-dentin border suggests their participation in odontoblast differentiation as well as in initial defense reactions during the pulpal regeneration process. On postoperative day 14, the replanted pulp showed three regeneration patterns: (1) reparative dentin, (2) bone-like tissue formation, and (3) an intermediate form between these. In all cases, PAS-reactive cells such as polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PML) and mesenchymal cells occurred in the pulp space. However, the prolonged stagnation of inflammatory cells was also discernible in the latter two cases. Thus, the findings on PAS reaction suggest that the migration of the dental follicle-derived cells into the pulp space and the subsequent total death of the proper pulpal cells are decisive factors for eliciting bone-like tissue formation in the replanted pulp.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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