ALBERT

All Library Books, journals and Electronic Records Telegrafenberg

feed icon rss

Your email was sent successfully. Check your inbox.

An error occurred while sending the email. Please try again.

Proceed reservation?

Export
  • 1
    facet.materialart.
    Unknown
    Toronto, Ontario: The Bichler and Nitzan Archives
    Publication Date: 2017-05-22
    Description: Over the past century, the institution of capital and the process of its accumulation have been fundamentally transformed. By contrast, the theories that explain this institution and process have remained largely unchanged. The purpose of this paper is to address this mismatch. Using a broad brush, we outline a new, power theory of capital and accumulation. We use this theory to assess the changing meaning of the corporation and the capitalist state, the new ways in which capital gets accumulated and the specific historical trajectory of twentieth-century capitalism up to the present.
    Keywords: ddc:330 ; arms ; accumulation ; capital ; flow ; capitalism ; conflict ; corporation ; crisis ; distribution ; elite ; energy ; finance ; globalization ; growth ; imperialism ; GPE ; liberalism ; Marxism ; Middle East ; military ; national ; interest ; neoclassical economics ; neoliberal
    Repository Name: EconStor: OA server of the German National Library of Economics - Leibniz Information Centre for Economics
    Language: English
    Type: doc-type:article
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 2
    facet.materialart.
    Unknown
    Toronto, Ontario: The Bichler and Nitzan Archives
    Publication Date: 2017-05-18
    Description: Over the past decade, soaring commodity prices have had a relatively minor impact on the overall level of prices, at least by historical standards. Whereas oil is twelve times more expensive now that it was in 1999, consumer prices in industrialized countries are only 20 per cent higher. This short note explains why the sluggish response of inflation may be about to change.
    Keywords: ddc:330 ; capital ; high-tech ; inflation ; Middle East ; oil prices ; stagflation
    Repository Name: EconStor: OA server of the German National Library of Economics - Leibniz Information Centre for Economics
    Language: English
    Type: doc-type:preprint
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 3
    facet.materialart.
    Unknown
    London, New York: Routledge
    Publication Date: 2017-05-19
    Description: Conventional theories of capitalism are mired in a deep crisis: after centuries of debate, they are still unable to tell us what capital is. Liberals and Marxists both think of capital as an 'economic' entity that they count in universal units of ‘utils’ or 'abstract labour', respectively. But these units are totally fictitious. Nobody has ever been able to observe or measure them, and for a good reason: they don’t exist. Since liberalism and Marxism depend on these non-existing units, their theories hang in suspension. They cannot explain the process that matters most – the accumulation of capital. This book offers a radical alternative. According to the authors, capital is not a narrow economic entity, but a symbolic quantification of power. It has little to do with utility or abstract labour, and it extends far beyond machines and production lines. Capital, the authors claim, represents the organized power of dominant capital groups to reshape – or creorder – their society. Written in simple language, accessible to lay readers and experts alike, the book develops a novel political economy. It takes the reader through the history, assumptions and limitations of mainstream economics and its associated theories of politics. It examines the evolution of Marxist thinking on accumulation and the state. And it articulates an innovative theory of 'capital as power' and a new history of the 'capitalist mode of power'.
    Keywords: ddc:330 ; absentee ownership ; accumulation ; benchmark ; bond ; bourgeoisie ; breadth ; business enterprise ; capital ; class ; corporation ; cosmology ; credit ; creorder ; crisis ; debt ; deflation ; depth ; differential ; dissonance vs. resonance ; dominant capital ; duality ; elementary particles ; equilibrium ; exploitation ; feudalism ; fictitious capital ; finance ; globalization ; goodwill ; government ; green-field ; hologram ; hype ; industry ; inflation ; institutionalism ; labour theory of value ; liberty ; markup ; mergers and acquisitions ; mode of power ; mode of production ; neoclassical economics ; neo-Marxism ; nomos ; normal rate of return ; oppression ; political economy ; politics vs. economics ; price ; productive vs. unproductive labour ; productivity ; profit ; real vs. nominal ; risk ; sabotage ; securities ; skilled vs. unskilled labour ; socially necessary abstract labour ; space ; stagnation ; stagflation ; state of capital ; stocks ; surplus value ; tangible vs. intangible assets ; technology ; uncertainty ; utility ; utils
    Repository Name: EconStor: OA server of the German National Library of Economics - Leibniz Information Centre for Economics
    Language: English
    Type: doc-type:book
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 4
    facet.materialart.
    Unknown
    Toronto, Ontario: The Bichler & Nitzan Archives
    Publication Date: 2017-05-20
    Description: Theories of society, as of nature, are characterized by their elementary particles. The elementary particle of neoclassical economics is the util. The elementary particle of classical Marxism is abstract labour. These elementary particles represent material quanta. They are deemed useful because both neoclassical economics and classical Marxism analyze capitalism as a mode of production and consumption. In this paper we offer a different approach. We argue that, most broadly, capitalism should be seen not as a mode of production, but a mode of power. From a viewpoint of power, utils and abstract labour are useless. They represent absolute magnitudes, whereas power is inherently relative. To understand the capitalist mode of power we need new elementary particles. The basic unit of analysis we begin with is differential capitalization. Capitalization represents the present value of expected future earnings (ex-post future earnings modified by investors’ hype), which in turn are corrected for risk perceptions and discounted by the normal rate of return. Differential capitalization benchmarks the capitalization of any owner or group of owners against the average owner. The paper begins by exploring the four elementary particles that comprise differential accumulation – future earnings, hype, risk and the normal rate of return. It concludes by assessing the implications of this new framework of differential capitalization for understanding the capitalist mode of power.
    Keywords: ddc:330 ; capital ; capitalization ; hype ; labour ; Marxism ; neoclassical economics ; normal rate of return ; risk ; power ; profit ; utility ; value
    Repository Name: EconStor: OA server of the German National Library of Economics - Leibniz Information Centre for Economics
    Language: English
    Type: doc-type:conferenceObject
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 5
    facet.materialart.
    Unknown
    Toronto, Ontario: The Bichler and Nitzan Archives
    Publication Date: 2017-05-18
    Description: Many observers of the Israeli scene have been perplexed by the country’s apparent resilience to bad political news. The headlines of late seem uniformly dreadful. While the country is still licking its wounds from a botched, if not humiliating war with Hezbollah, the Palestinian territories again slide into turmoil, and the experts rumour yet another conflict with Syria. The U.S. entanglement is Iraq and Afghanistan is only getting deeper, and many speak of an imminent attack on Iran with untold regional consequences. Israeli politicians and public officials – from the president, through the prime minister, to the chief of staff, to the justice minister – have been embroiled in corruption and other scandals. The courageous capitalist media routinely expose government officials as incompetent crooks and the Israelis Parliament as an irrelevant institution. And yet, none of these headlines seem to impact the economy. It’s roaring. Many commentators have been trying to make sense of this apparent puzzle. But their explanations, whether plausible or not, all fall into the same trap: they believe the capitalist media. They rush to explain why the Israeli economy is roaring without ever stopping to ask whether it is roaring.
    Keywords: ddc:330 ; capital ; finance ; growth ; Israel ; ownership ; measurement ; neoclassical economics ; stock market ; transnationalization
    Repository Name: EconStor: OA server of the German National Library of Economics - Leibniz Information Centre for Economics
    Language: English
    Type: doc-type:preprint
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 6
    facet.materialart.
    Unknown
    Toronto, Ontario: The Bichler and Nitzan Archives
    Publication Date: 2017-05-18
    Description: The April 21, 2005 issue of the LONDON REVIEW OF BOOKS carried a lead article titled ‘Blood for Oil?’ The paper is attributed to a group of writers and activists – Iain Boal, T.J. Clark, Joseph Matthews and Michael Watts – who identify themselves by the collective name ‘Retort.’ In their article, the authors advance a supposedly new explanation for the wars in the Middle East. Much of their explanation – including both theory and fact – is plagiarized. It is cut and pasted, almost ‘as is,’ from our own work. The primary source is ‘The Weapondollar-Petrodollar Coalition,’ a 71 page chapter in our book THE GLOBAL POLITICAL ECONOMY OF ISRAEL (Pluto 2002). The authors also seem inspired, incognito, by our more recent papers, including ‘It’s All About Oil’ (2003), ‘Clash of Civilization or Capital Accumulation?’ (2004), ‘Beyond Neoliberalism’ (2004) and ‘Dominant Capital and the New Wars’ (2004). In their paper, the Retort group credits us for having coined the term ‘Weapondollar-Petrodollar Coalition’ – but dismiss our ‘precise calibration of the oil/war nexus’ as ‘perfunctory.’ This dismissal does not prevent them from freely appropriating, wholesale fashion, our concepts, ideas and theories – including, among others, the ‘era of free flow,’ the ‘era of limited flow,’ ‘energy conflicts,’ the ‘commercialization of arms exports,’ the ‘politicization of oil’ and the critique of the ‘scarcity thesis.’ Nowhere in their article do the authors mention the source of these concepts, ideas and theories; occasionally, they even introduce them with the prefix ‘Our view is. . . .’ Their treatment of facts is not very different. They freely use (sometimes without understanding) research methods, statistics and data that took us years to conceive, estimate and measure – again, never mentioning the source. These concepts, theories and facts are far from trivial. Until recently, they were greeted with strategic silence, from both right and left. Their publication has been repeatedly denied and censored by mainstream as well as progressive journals (including, it must be said, by the LONDON REVIEW OF BOOKS, that turned down our paper on the subject). They cannot be found anywhere else in the literature, conservative or radical. To treat them as ‘common knowledge’ is deceitful. To cut and paste them without due attribution is blatant plagiarism. The first part of our paper illustrates this process of ‘intellectual accumulation-by-dispossession’ with selected examples. The issue, though, goes well beyond personal vanity and self-aggrandizement. At the core, we are dealing here with the clash of science and church, with the constant attempt of organized faith – whether religious or academic – to disable, block and, if necessary, appropriate creativity and novelty. Creativity and novelty are dangerous. They defy dogma and undermine the conventional creed; they challenge the dominant ideology and threaten those in power; occasionally, they cause the entire edifice of power to crumble. For these reasons, the latent purpose of intellectual accumulation-by-dispossession – like the accumulation of private property – is primarily negative. The word ‘private’ comes from the Latin ‘privatus,’ meaning ‘restricted,’ and from ‘privare,’ which means ‘to deprive.’ And, indeed, the most important feature of private ownership is not to enable those who own, but to disable those who do not. It is only through the threat of prevention – or ‘strategic sabotage’ as Thorsein Veblen called it – that accumulation can take place. It is only by restricting the free creativity of society that society itself can be controlled. The second section of the paper explains how the appropriators of ‘Blood for Oil?’ fit this pattern. The final section of the paper is an epilogue. It describes our failed attempts to get this paper published with The LONDON REVIEW OF BOOKS; Retort’s efforts to mislead us; and some additional insight from their AFFLICTED POWERS, a 2005 Verso book that contains the same plagiarism and more. The epilogue concludes with a few observations on the nature of academic dialectics.
    Keywords: ddc:330 ; academia ; arms ; accumulation ; capital ; capitalism ; church ; conflict ; corporation ; crisis ; data ; development ; distribution ; dual ; economy ; elite ; energy ; finance ; globalization ; growth ; imperialism ; distribution ; institutionalism ; IPE ; liberalization ; meth
    Repository Name: EconStor: OA server of the German National Library of Economics - Leibniz Information Centre for Economics
    Language: English
    Type: doc-type:preprint
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 7
    facet.materialart.
    Unknown
    Toronto, Ontario: The Bichler and Nitzan Archives
    Publication Date: 2017-05-18
    Description: Over the past century, Marxism has been radically transformed in line with circumstances and fashion. Theses that once looked solid have depreciated and fallen by the sideline; concepts that once were deemed crucial have been abandoned; slogans that once sounded clear and meaningful have become fuzzy and ineffectual. But two key words seem to have survived the attrition and withstood the test of time: imperialism and financialism. Talk of imperialism and financialism – and particularly of the nexus between them – remains as catchy as ever. Marxists of different colours – from classical, to neo to post – find the two terms expedient, if not indispensable. Radical anarchists, conservative Stalinists and distinguished academics of various denominations all continue to use and debate them. The views of course differ greatly, but there is a common thread: for most Marxists, imperialism and financialism are prime causes of our worldly ills. Their nexus is said to explain capitalist development and underdevelopment; it underlies capitalist power and contradictions; and it drives capitalist globalization, its regional realignment and local dynamics. It is a fit-all logo for street demonstrators and a generic battle cry for armchair analysts. The secret behind this staying power is flexibility. Over the years, the concepts of imperialism and financialism have changed more or less beyond recognition, as a result of which the link between them nowadays connotes something totally different from what it meant a century ago. The purpose of this article is to outline this chameleon-like transformation, to assess what is left of the nexus and to ask whether this nexus is still worth keeping.
    Keywords: ddc:330 ; capital ; dependency ; finance ; hegemony ; imperialism ; Marxism ; monopoly ; world systems
    Repository Name: EconStor: OA server of the German National Library of Economics - Leibniz Information Centre for Economics
    Language: English
    Type: doc-type:preprint
    Location Call Number Expected Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
Close ⊗
This website uses cookies and the analysis tool Matomo. More information can be found here...