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  • 2010-2014  (15)
  • 1
  • 2
    Publication Date: 2019-07-17
    Description: The current estimate for soil organic carbon (SOC) quantity in the northern circumpolar permafrost region (Tarnocai et al., 2009) is 191 Pg for topsoil (0–30 cm depth), 496 Pg for the upper 100 cm of soil and SOC mass to 300 cm soil depth is estimated to be 1024 Pg. In addition, storage in deeper (〉 300 cm) Yedoma deposits (407 Pg) and deltaic deposits (241 Pg) brings the total estimate to 1672 Pg, of which 1466 Pg is stored in perennially frozen ground. The estimate for 0–1 m depth SOC mass is based on the Northern Circumpolar Soil Carbon Database (NCSCD), a geospatial database which links 1647 pedons from the northern permafrost regions to several digitized regional/national soil maps with a combined circumpolar coverage. This database has recently been published online and the data is available in several different file formats, including gridded files with different spatial resolutions. Files adapted for use in GIS or modeling applications (shape-files, TIFF-rasters and NetCDF files) are available for separate regions or with merged circumpolar coverage. Estimates for the 0–30 cm and 0–100 cm depth ranges based on the NCSCD are unlikely to be significantly changed or refined in the coming years. However, the emergence of high quality geospatial datasets with circumpolar coverage as well as applications of spatially distributed regression/kriging techniques in periglacial environments (e.g. Mishra and Riley, 2012) point towards complementary approaches that may significantly increase our knowledge of circumpolar SOC distribution. The present estimates of SOC mass in the 0–300 cm depth range is based on very limited field data (46 Canadian pedons), is accorded low to very low confidence and is not included in the spatially distributed NCSCD (Tarnocai et al., 2009). However, a compilation of additional pedon data is underway and an updated version of the NCSCD will be complemented with spatially distributed estimates of 100–200 cm and 200–300 cm depth SOCM based on 〉 200 deep pedons from around the circumpolar region. This estimate is also planned to include quantification of upscaling uncertainties caused by insufficient field sampling of naturally variable soils and areal misrepresentation of soil types in the maps used for upscaling (following Hugelius, 2012). Hugelius, G. (2012), Spatial upscaling using thematic maps: An analysis of uncertainties in permafrost soil carbon estimates, Global Biogeochem. Cycles, 26, GB2026, doi:10.1029/2011GB004154 Mishra U. and Riley W.J. (2012) Alaskan soil carbon stocks: spatial variability and dependence on environmental factors, Biogeosciences Discuss, 9, 5695–5718
    Repository Name: EPIC Alfred Wegener Institut
    Type: Conference , NonPeerReviewed
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  • 3
    Publication Date: 2014-07-15
    Description: High latitude terrestrial ecosystems are key components in the global carbon (C) cycle. The Northern Circumpolar Soil Carbon Database (NCSCD) was developed to quantify stocks of soil organic carbon (SOC) in the northern circumpolar permafrost region (18.7×106 km2 5 ). The NCSCD is a digital Geographical Information systems (GIS) database compiled from harmonized regional soil classification maps, in which data on soil coverage has been linked to pedon data from the northern permafrost regions. Previously, the NCSCD has been used to calculate SOC content (SOCC) and mass (SOCM) to the reference depths 0–30 cm and 0–100 cm (based on 1778 pedons). It 10 has been shown that soils of the northern circumpolar permafrost region also contain significant quantities of SOC in the 100–300 cm depth range, but there has been no circumpolar compilation of pedon data to quantify this SOC pool and there are no spatially distributed estimates of SOC storage below 100 cm depth in this region. Here we describe the synthesis of an updated pedon dataset for SOCC in deep soils 15 of the northern circumpolar permafrost regions, with separate datasets for the 100– 200 cm (524 pedons) and 200–300 cm (356 pedons) depth ranges. These pedons have been grouped into the American and Eurasian sectors and the mean SOCC for different soil taxa (subdivided into Histels, Turbels, Orthels, Histosols, and permafrost-free mineral soil taxa) has been added to the updated NCSCDv2. The updated version of 20 the database is freely available online in several different file formats and spatial resolutions that enable spatially explicit usage in e.g. GIS and/or terrestrial ecosystem models. The potential applications and limitations of the NCSCDv2 in spatial analyses are briefly discussed. An open access data-portal for all the described GIS-datasets is available online at: http://dev1.geo.su.se/bbcc/dev/v3/ncscd/download.php. The NC25 SCDv2 database has the doi:10.5879/ECDS/00000002.
    Repository Name: EPIC Alfred Wegener Institut
    Type: Article , NonPeerReviewed
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  • 4
    Publication Date: 2019-07-17
    Description: Soils and other unconsolidated deposits in the northern circumpolar permafrost region store large amounts of soil organic carbon (SOC). This SOC is potentially vulnerable to remobilization following soil warming and permafrost thaw, but stock estimates are poorly constrained and quantitative error estimates were lacking. This study presents revised estimates of the permafrost SOC pool, including quantitative uncertainty estimates, in the 0–3 m depth range in soils as well as for deeper sediments (〉3 m) in deltaic deposits of major rivers and in the Yedoma region of Siberia and Alaska. The revised estimates are based on significantly larger databases compared to previous studies. Compared to previous studies, the number of individual sites/pedons has increased by a factor ×8–11 for soils in the 1–3 m depth range,, a factor ×8 for deltaic alluvium and a factor ×5 for Yedoma region deposits. Upscaled based on regional soil maps, estimated permafrost region SOC stocks are 217 ± 15 and 472 ± 34 Pg for the 0–0.3 m and 0–1 m soil depths, respectively (±95% confidence intervals). Depending on the regional subdivision used to upscale 1–3 m soils (following physiography or continents), estimated 0–3 m SOC storage is 1034 ± 183 Pg or 1104 ± 133 Pg. Of this, 34 ± 16 Pg C is stored in thin soils of the High Arctic. Based on generalised calculations, storage of SOC in deep deltaic alluvium (〉3 m to ≤60 m depth) of major Arctic rivers is estimated to 91 ± 39 Pg (of which 69 ± 34 Pg is in permafrost). In the Yedoma region, estimated 〉3 m SOC stocks are 178 +140/−146 Pg, of which 74 +54/−57 Pg is stored in intact, frozen Yedoma (late Pleistocene ice- and organic-rich silty sediments) with the remainder in refrozen thermokarst deposits (±16/84th percentiles of bootstrapped estimates). A total estimated mean storage for the permafrost region of ca. 1300–1370 Pg with an uncertainty range of 930–1690 Pg encompasses the combined revised estimates. Of this, ≤819–836 Pg is perennially frozen. While some components of the revised SOC stocks are similar in magnitude to those previously reported for this region, there are also substantial differences in individual components. There is evidence of remaining regional data-gaps. Estimates remain particularly poorly constrained for soils in the High Arctic region and physiographic regions with thin sedimentary overburden (mountains, highlands and plateaus) as well as for 〉3 m depth deposits in deltas and the Yedoma region.
    Repository Name: EPIC Alfred Wegener Institut
    Type: Article , NonPeerReviewed
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  • 5
    Publication Date: 2014-07-15
    Description: High-latitude terrestrial ecosystems are key components in the global carbon cycle. The Northern Circumpolar Soil Carbon Database (NCSCD) was developed to quantify stocks of soil organic carbon (SOC) in the northern circumpolar permafrost region (a total area of 18.7 × 106 km2). The NCSCD is a geographical information system (GIS) data set that has been constructed using harmonized regional soil classification maps together with pedon data from the northern permafrost region. Previously, the NCSCD has been used to calculate SOC storage to the reference depths 0–30 cm and 0–100 cm (based on 1778 pedons). It has been shown that soils of the northern circumpolar permafrost region also contain significant quantities of SOC in the 100–300 cm depth range, but there has been no circumpolar compilation of pedon data to quantify this deeper SOC pool and there are no spatially distributed estimates of SOC storage below 100 cm depth in this region. Here we describe the synthesis of an updated pedon data set for SOC storage (kg C m−2) in deep soils of the northern circumpolar permafrost regions, with separate data sets for the 100–200 cm (524 pedons) and 200–300 cm (356 pedons) depth ranges. These pedons have been grouped into the North American and Eurasian sectors and the mean SOC storage for different soil taxa (subdivided into Gelisols including the sub-orders Histels, Turbels, Orthels, permafrost-free Histosols, and permafrost-free mineral soil orders) has been added to the updated NCSCDv2. The updated version of the data set is freely available online in different file formats and spatial resolutions that enable spatially explicit applications in GIS mapping and terrestrial ecosystem models. While this newly compiled data set adds to our knowledge of SOC in the 100–300 cm depth range, it also reveals that large uncertainties remain. Identified data gaps include spatial coverage of deep (〉 100 cm) pedons in many regions as well as the spatial extent of areas with thin soils overlying bedrock and the quantity and distribution of massive ground ice. An open access data-portal for the pedon data set and the GIS-data sets is available online at http://bolin.su.se/data/ncscd/. The NCSCDv2 data set has a digital object identifier (doi:10.5879/ECDS/00000002).
    Repository Name: EPIC Alfred Wegener Institut
    Type: Article , NonPeerReviewed
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  • 6
    Publication Date: 2014-05-01
    Description: Nature Physics 10, 357 (2014). doi:10.1038/nphys2926 Authors: Vivek Mishra, U. Chatterjee, J. C. Campuzano & M. R. Norman Cuprates possess a large pseudogap that spans much of their phase diagram. The origin of this pseudogap is as debated as the mechanism for high-temperature superconductivity. In one class of theories, the pseudogap arises from some instability not related to pairing, typically charge, spin or orbital current ordering. Evidence of this has come from a variety of measurements indicating symmetry breaking. On the other side are theories where the pseudogap is associated with pairing. This ranges from preformed pairs to resonating valence bond theories where spin singlets become charge coherent. Here, we study pairing in the cuprates by constructing the pair vertex using spectral functions derived from angle-resolved photoemission data. Assuming that the pseudogap is not due to pairing, we find that the superconducting instability is strongly suppressed, in stark contrast to what is actually observed. We trace this suppression to the destruction of the BCS logarithmic singularity from a combination of the pseudogap and lifetime broadening. Our findings strongly support those theories of the cuprates where the pseudogap is instead due to pairing.
    Print ISSN: 1745-2473
    Electronic ISSN: 1745-2481
    Topics: Physics
    Published by Springer Nature
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  • 7
    Publication Date: 2014-09-22
    Description: Cultivation of the terrestrial land surface can create either a source or sink of atmospheric CO2, depending on land management practices. The Community Land Model (CLM) provides a useful tool to explore how land use and management impact the soil carbon pool at regional to global scales. CLM was recently updated to include representation of managed lands growing maize, soybean, and spring wheat. In this study, CLM-Crop is used to investigate the impacts of various management practices, including fertilizer use and differential rates of crop residue removal, on the soil organic carbon (SOC) storage of croplands in the continental United States over approximately a 170 year period. Results indicate that total US SOC stocks have already lost over 8 Pg C (10%) due to land cultivation practices (e.g., fertilizer application, cultivar choice, and residue removal), compared to a land surface composed of native vegetation (i.e., grasslands). After long periods of cultivation, individual plots growing maize and soybean lost up to 65% of the carbon stored, compared to a grassland site. Crop residue management showed the greatest effect on soil carbon storage, with low and medium residue returns resulting in additional losses of 5% and 3.5%, respectively, in US carbon storage, while plots with high residue returns stored 2% more carbon. Nitrogenous fertilizer can alter the amount of soil carbon stocks significantly. Under current levels of crop residue return, not applying fertilizer resulted in a 5% loss of soil carbon. Our simulations indicate that disturbance through cultivation will always result in a loss of soil carbon, and management practices will have a large influence on the magnitude of SOC loss.
    Print ISSN: 1810-6277
    Electronic ISSN: 1810-6285
    Topics: Biology , Geosciences
    Published by Copernicus on behalf of European Geosciences Union (EGU).
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  • 8
    Publication Date: 2014-03-26
    Description: Soils and other unconsolidated deposits in the northern circumpolar permafrost region store large amounts of soil organic carbon (SOC). This SOC is potentially vulnerable to remobilization following soil warming and permafrost thaw, but stock estimates are poorly constrained and quantitative error estimates were lacking. This study presents revised estimates of the permafrost SOC pool, including quantitative uncertainty estimates, in the 0–3 m depth range in soils as well as for deeper sediments (〉3 m) in deltaic deposits of major rivers and in the Yedoma region of Siberia and Alaska. The revised estimates are based on significantly larger databases compared to previous studies. Compared to previous studies, the number of individual sites/pedons has increased by a factor ×8–11 for soils in the 1–3 m depth range,, a factor ×8 for deltaic alluvium and a factor ×5 for Yedoma region deposits. Upscaled based on regional soil maps, estimated permafrost region SOC stocks are 217 ± 15 and 472 ± 34 Pg for the 0–0.3 m and 0–1 m soil depths, respectively (±95% confidence intervals). Depending on the regional subdivision used to upscale 1–3 m soils (following physiography or continents), estimated 0–3 m SOC storage is 1034 ± 183 Pg or 1104 ± 133 Pg. Of this, 34 ± 16 Pg C is stored in thin soils of the High Arctic. Based on generalised calculations, storage of SOC in deep deltaic alluvium (〉3 m to ≤60 m depth) of major Arctic rivers is estimated to 91 ± 39 Pg (of which 69 ± 34 Pg is in permafrost). In the Yedoma region, estimated 〉3 m SOC stocks are 178 +140/−146 Pg, of which 74 +54/−57 Pg is stored in intact, frozen Yedoma (late Pleistocene ice- and organic-rich silty sediments) with the remainder in refrozen thermokarst deposits (±16/84th percentiles of bootstrapped estimates). A total estimated mean storage for the permafrost region of ca. 1300–1370 Pg with an uncertainty range of 930–1690 Pg encompasses the combined revised estimates. Of this, ≤819–836 Pg is perennially frozen. While some components of the revised SOC stocks are similar in magnitude to those previously reported for this region, there are also substantial differences in individual components. There is evidence of remaining regional data-gaps. Estimates remain particularly poorly constrained for soils in the High Arctic region and physiographic regions with thin sedimentary overburden (mountains, highlands and plateaus) as well as for 〉3 m depth deposits in deltas and the Yedoma region.
    Print ISSN: 1810-6277
    Electronic ISSN: 1810-6285
    Topics: Biology , Geosciences
    Published by Copernicus on behalf of European Geosciences Union (EGU).
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  • 9
    Publication Date: 2012-09-20
    Description: The direction and magnitude of soil organic carbon (SOC) changes in response to climate change depend on the spatial and vertical distributions of SOC. We estimated spatially resolved SOC stocks from surface to C horizon, distinguishing active-layer and permafrost-layer stocks, based on geospatial analysis of 472 soil profiles and spatially referenced environmental variables for Alaska. Total Alaska state-wide SOC stock was estimated to be 77 Pg, with 61% in the active-layer, 27% in permafrost, and 12% in non-permafrost soils. Prediction accuracy was highest for the active-layer as demonstrated by highest ratio of performance to deviation (1.5). Large spatial variability was predicted, with whole-profile, active-layer, and permafrost-layer stocks ranging from 1–296 kg C m−2, 2–166 kg m−2, and 0–232 kg m−2, respectively. Temperature and soil wetness were found to be primary controllers of whole-profile, active-layer, and permafrost-layer SOC stocks. Secondary controllers, in order of importance, were found to be land cover type, topographic attributes, and bedrock geology. The observed importance of soil wetness rather than precipitation on SOC stocks implies that the poor representation of high-latitude soil wetness in Earth system models may lead to large uncertainty in predicted SOC stocks under future climate change scenarios. Under strict caveats described in the text and assuming temperature changes from the A1B Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change emissions scenario, our geospatial model indicates that the equilibrium average 2100 Alaska active-layer depth could deepen by 11 cm, resulting in a thawing of 13 Pg C currently in permafrost. The equilibrium SOC loss associated with this warming would be highest under continuous permafrost (31%), followed by discontinuous (28%), isolated (24.3%), and sporadic (23.6%) permafrost areas. Our high-resolution mapping of soil carbon stock reveals the potential vulnerability of high-latitude soil carbon and can be used as a basis for future studies of anthropogenic and climatic perturbations.
    Print ISSN: 1726-4170
    Electronic ISSN: 1726-4189
    Topics: Biology , Geosciences
    Published by Copernicus on behalf of European Geosciences Union (EGU).
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  • 10
    Publication Date: 2012-05-14
    Print ISSN: 1810-6277
    Electronic ISSN: 1810-6285
    Topics: Biology , Geosciences
    Published by Copernicus on behalf of European Geosciences Union (EGU).
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