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  • 1
    Publication Date: 2014-10-04
    Description: Ethanol toxicity in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae limits titer and productivity in the industrial production of transportation bioethanol. We show that strengthening the opposing potassium and proton electrochemical membrane gradients is a mechanism that enhances general resistance to multiple alcohols. The elevation of extracellular potassium and pH physically bolsters these gradients, increasing tolerance to higher alcohols and ethanol fermentation in commercial and laboratory strains (including a xylose-fermenting strain) under industrial-like conditions. Production per cell remains largely unchanged, with improvements deriving from heightened population viability. Likewise, up-regulation of the potassium and proton pumps in the laboratory strain enhances performance to levels exceeding those of industrial strains. Although genetically complex, alcohol tolerance can thus be dominated by a single cellular process, one controlled by a major physicochemical component but amenable to biological augmentation.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4401034/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4401034/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Lam, Felix H -- Ghaderi, Adel -- Fink, Gerald R -- Stephanopoulos, Gregory -- R01 GM035010/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- R01-GM035010/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2014 Oct 3;346(6205):71-5. doi: 10.1126/science.1257859. Epub 2014 Oct 2.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Chemical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA, USA. Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research, Cambridge, MA, USA. ; Department of Chemical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA, USA. ; Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research, Cambridge, MA, USA. gfink@wi.mit.edu gregstep@mit.edu. ; Department of Chemical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA, USA. gfink@wi.mit.edu gregstep@mit.edu.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25278607" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: *Biofuels ; Cation Transport Proteins/genetics ; Cell Culture Techniques ; Cell Membrane/metabolism ; Chemical Engineering ; *Drug Resistance, Fungal/genetics ; Ethanol/*metabolism/pharmacology ; Fermentation ; Genetic Engineering ; Glucose/metabolism ; Hydrogen-Ion Concentration ; Phosphates/*metabolism ; Potassium Compounds/*metabolism ; Proton Pumps/genetics ; Proton-Translocating ATPases/genetics ; Saccharomyces cerevisiae/drug effects/genetics/*metabolism ; Saccharomyces cerevisiae Proteins/genetics ; Up-Regulation ; Xylose/metabolism
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 2
    Publication Date: 2013-10-15
    Description: Kuningas, S., Kvadsheim, P. H., Lam, F-P. A., and Miller, P. J. O. 2013. Killer whale presence in relation to naval sonar activity and prey abundance in northern Norway. – ICES Journal of Marine Science, 70: . In this study, retrospective data on naval sonar activity and prey abundance were correlated with killer whale sightings within a fjord basin in northern Norway. In addition, passive acoustic and visual marine mammal surveys were conducted before, during, and after a specific navy exercise in 2006. Herring abundance was the main factor affecting killer whale presence. Naval sonar, either operational navy sonar exercises (Flotex) or experimental sonar activity (CEE) alone, did not explain killer whale occurrence. However, naval sonar activity during a period of low prey availability seemed to have had a negative effect on killer whale presence. We conclude that the level of reaction to sonar can be influenced by multiple factors, including availability of prey.
    Print ISSN: 1054-3139
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9289
    Topics: Biology , Geosciences , Physics
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