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  • 1
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    In:  J. Geophys. Res., Warszawa, Bundesanstalt für Geowissenschaften und Rohstoffe, vol. 89, no. 1, pp. 6918-6928, pp. 2121
    Publication Date: 1984
    Keywords: Source parameters ; Fault plane solution, focal mechanism ; Tectonics ; China ; Hypocentral depth ; JGR
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  • 2
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    In:  J. Geophys. Res., Luxembourg, Conseil de l'Europe, vol. 86, no. 1-4, pp. 7874-7894, pp. 1006, (ISSN: 1340-4202)
    Publication Date: 1981
    Keywords: Earthquake ; Seismology ; Geol. aspects ; Tectonics ; JGR
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  • 3
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    In:  Tectonophys., Luxembourg, Conseil de l'Europe, vol. 105, no. 1-4, pp. 263-278, pp. 1006, (ISSN: 1340-4202)
    Publication Date: 1984
    Keywords: Subduction zone ; China ; Seismicity
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  • 4
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    Am. Geophys. Un.
    In:  Bull., Open-File Rept., Zagros, Hindu Kush, Himalaya: Geodynamic Evolution, Washington, D. C., Am. Geophys. Un., vol. 5, no. 16, pp. 215-242, (ISBN 1-86239-165-3, vi + 330 pp.)
    Publication Date: 1981
    Keywords: Seismicity ; Subduction zone ; Plate tectonics
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  • 5
    Publication Date: 2013-08-20
    Description: [1]  The distribution of plate motion between multiple fault strands and how this distribution may evolve remain poorly understood, despite the key implications for seismic hazards. The North Anatolian Fault (NAF) in northwest Turkey is a prime example of a multi-stranded continental transform. Here we present the first constraints on late Quaternary slip rates on its northern branch across the Cinarcik Basin in the eastern Marmara Sea. We use both deep penetration and high-resolution multichannel seismic reflection data with a stratigraphic age model to show that a depocenter has persisted near the fault bend responsible for that transform basin. Successively older depocenters have been transported westward by fault motion relative to Eurasia, indicating a uniform right-lateral slip rate of 18.5 mm/yr over the last 500,000 years, compared to overall GPS rates (23-24 mm/yr). Thus, the northern branch has slipped at a nearly constant rate and has accounted for most of the relative plate motion between Eurasia and Anatolia since ~0.5 Ma.
    Print ISSN: 0094-8276
    Electronic ISSN: 1944-8007
    Topics: Geosciences , Physics
    Published by Wiley on behalf of American Geophysical Union (AGU).
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  • 6
    Publication Date: 2013-04-25
    Description: [1]  The geometry, kinematics, and mode of back-arc extension along the Andaman Sea plate boundary are refined using a new set of significantly improved hypocenters, global CMT solutions, and high-resolution bathymetry. By applying cross-correlation and double-difference algorithms to regional and teleseismic waveforms and arrival times from ISC and NEIC bulletins (1964–2009), we resolve the fine-scale structure and spatio-temporal behavior of active faults in the Andaman Sea. The new data reveal that back-arc extension is primarily accommodated at the Andaman Back-Arc Spreading Center (ABSC) at ~10º, which hosted 3 major earthquake swarms in 1984, 2006, and 2009. Short-term spreading rates estimated from extensional moment tensors account for less than 10% of the long-term 3.0–3.8 cm/yr spreading rate, indicating that spreading by intrusion and the formation of new crust make up for the difference. A spatio-temporal analysis of the swarms and Coulomb-stress modeling show that dike intrusions are the primary driver for brittle failure in the ABSC. While spreading direction is close to ridge-normal, it is oblique to the adjacent transforms. The resulting component of E-W extension across the transforms is expressed by deep basins on either side of the rift and a change to extensional faulting along the West Andaman Fault system after the Mw = 9.2 Sumatra-Andaman earthquake of 2004. A possible skew in slip vectors of earthquakes in the eastern part of the ABSC indicates an en-echelon arrangement of extensional structures, suggesting that the present segment geometry is not in equilibrium with current plate-motion demands and thus the ridge experiences ongoing re-adjustment.
    Print ISSN: 0148-0227
    Topics: Geosciences , Physics
    Published by Wiley on behalf of American Geophysical Union (AGU).
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  • 7
    Publication Date: 2011-08-18
    Description: Synthetic seismograms were compared with long-period body waves for nine earthquakes with epicenters in the Himalayan arc to determine depths of foci and to improve fault plane solutions. Focal depths are shallow (10-20 km). Inferred slip vectors are locally perpendicular to the mountain range; they plunge very gently (about 10 deg) in the eastern sections of the range and more steeply (about 25 deg) in western sections. Assuming India to be a rigid plate, the radially oriented slip vectors imply that southern Tibet extends at about half the rate of underthrusting in the Himalaya and therefore probably at about 5-10 mm/yr. The shallow depths and gentle dips of the fault planes, at least for the events in the eastern half of the range, are consistent with coherent underthrusting of the Indian plate beneath, at least, the Lesser Himalaya. The steeper dips of fault planes in the western part of the arc might reflect deformation of the overriding thrust plate or simply a steepening of the main underthrusting zone beneath the Greater Himalaya.
    Keywords: GEOPHYSICS
    Type: Journal of Geophysical Research (ISSN 0148-0227); 89; 6918-692
    Format: text
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  • 8
    Publication Date: 2018-05-09
    Description: The geometry, kinematics, and mode of back‐arc extension along the Andaman Sea plate boundary are refined using a new set of significantly improved hypocenters, global centroid moment tensor (CMT) solutions, and high‐resolution bathymetry. By applying cross‐correlation and double‐difference (DD) algorithms to regional and teleseismic waveforms and arrival times from International Seismological Centre and National Earthquake Information Center bulletins (1964–2009), we resolve the fine‐scale structure and spatiotemporal behavior of active faults in the Andaman Sea. The new data reveal that back‐arc extension is primarily accommodated at the Andaman Back‐Arc Spreading Center (ABSC) at ~10°, which hosted three major earthquake swarms in 1984, 2006, and 2009. Short‐term spreading rates estimated from extensional moment tensors account for less than 10% of the long‐term 3.0–3.8 cm/yr spreading rate, indicating that spreading by intrusion and the formation of new crust make up for the difference. A spatiotemporal analysis of the swarms and Coulomb‐stress modeling show that dike intrusions are the primary driver for brittle failure in the ABSC. While spreading direction is close to ridge normal, it is oblique to the adjacent transforms. The resulting component of E‐W extension across the transforms is expressed by deep basins on either side of the rift and a change to extensional faulting along the West Andaman fault system after the Mw = 9.2 Sumatra‐Andaman earthquake of 2004. A possible skew in slip vectors of earthquakes in the eastern part of the ABSC indicates an en‐echelon arrangement of extensional structures, suggesting that the present segment geometry is not in equilibrium with current plate‐motion demands, and thus the ridge experiences ongoing re‐adjustment.
    Keywords: ddc:550
    Language: English
    Type: http://purl.org/escidoc/metadata/ves/publication-types/article
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  • 9
    Publication Date: 2018-05-09
    Description: The geometry, kinematics, and mode of back‐arc extension along the Andaman Sea plate boundary are refined using a new set of significantly improved hypocenters, global centroid moment tensor (CMT) solutions, and high‐resolution bathymetry. By applying cross‐correlation and double‐difference (DD) algorithms to regional and teleseismic waveforms and arrival times from International Seismological Centre and National Earthquake Information Center bulletins (1964–2009), we resolve the fine‐scale structure and spatiotemporal behavior of active faults in the Andaman Sea. The new data reveal that back‐arc extension is primarily accommodated at the Andaman Back‐Arc Spreading Center (ABSC) at ~10°, which hosted three major earthquake swarms in 1984, 2006, and 2009. Short‐term spreading rates estimated from extensional moment tensors account for less than 10% of the long‐term 3.0–3.8 cm/yr spreading rate, indicating that spreading by intrusion and the formation of new crust make up for the difference. A spatiotemporal analysis of the swarms and Coulomb‐stress modeling show that dike intrusions are the primary driver for brittle failure in the ABSC. While spreading direction is close to ridge normal, it is oblique to the adjacent transforms. The resulting component of E‐W extension across the transforms is expressed by deep basins on either side of the rift and a change to extensional faulting along the West Andaman fault system after the Mw = 9.2 Sumatra‐Andaman earthquake of 2004. A possible skew in slip vectors of earthquakes in the eastern part of the ABSC indicates an en‐echelon arrangement of extensional structures, suggesting that the present segment geometry is not in equilibrium with current plate‐motion demands, and thus the ridge experiences ongoing re‐adjustment.
    Language: English
    Type: http://purl.org/escidoc/metadata/ves/publication-types/article
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  • 10
    Publication Date: 2012-05-01
    Description: “Wave” fields have long been recognized in marine sediments on the flanks of basins and oceans in both tectonically active and inactive environments. The origin of “waves” (hereafter called undulations) is controversial; competing models ascribe them to depositional processes, gravity-driven downslope creep or collapse, and/or tectonic shortening. Here we analyze pervasive undulation fields identified in swath bathymetry and new high-resolution multichannel seismic (MCS) reflection data from the Sea of Marmara, Turkey. Although they exhibit some of the classical features of sediment waves, the following distinctive characteristics exclude a purely depositional origin: (1) parallelism between the crests of the undulations and bathymetric contours over a wide range of orientations, (2) steep flanks of the undulations (up to ∼40°), and (3) increases in undulations amplitude with depth. We argue that the undulations are folds formed by gravity-driven downslope creep that have been augmented by depositional processes. These creep folds develop over long time periods (≥0.5 m.y.) and stand in contrast to geologically instantaneous collapse. Stratigraphic growth on the upslope limbs indicates that deposition contributes to the formation and upslope migration of the folds. The temporal and spatial evolution of the creep folds is clearly related to rapid tilting in this tectonically active transform basin.
    Print ISSN: 0091-7613
    Electronic ISSN: 1943-2682
    Topics: Geosciences
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