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  • 1
    Publication Date: 2015-05-12
    Type: http://purl.org/escidoc/metadata/ves/publication-types/article
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  • 2
    Publication Date: 2012-05-05
    Description: Phytoplankton blooms characterize temperate ocean margin zones in spring. We investigated the bacterioplankton response to a diatom bloom in the North Sea and observed a dynamic succession of populations at genus-level resolution. Taxonomically distinct expressions of carbohydrate-active enzymes (transporters; in particular, TonB-dependent transporters) and phosphate acquisition strategies were found, indicating that distinct populations of Bacteroidetes, Gammaproteobacteria, and Alphaproteobacteria are specialized for successive decomposition of algal-derived organic matter. Our results suggest that algal substrate availability provided a series of ecological niches in which specialized populations could bloom. This reveals how planktonic species, despite their seemingly homogeneous habitat, can evade extinction by direct competition.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Teeling, Hanno -- Fuchs, Bernhard M -- Becher, Dorte -- Klockow, Christine -- Gardebrecht, Antje -- Bennke, Christin M -- Kassabgy, Mariette -- Huang, Sixing -- Mann, Alexander J -- Waldmann, Jost -- Weber, Marc -- Klindworth, Anna -- Otto, Andreas -- Lange, Jana -- Bernhardt, Jorg -- Reinsch, Christine -- Hecker, Michael -- Peplies, Jorg -- Bockelmann, Frank D -- Callies, Ulrich -- Gerdts, Gunnar -- Wichels, Antje -- Wiltshire, Karen H -- Glockner, Frank Oliver -- Schweder, Thomas -- Amann, Rudolf -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2012 May 4;336(6081):608-11. doi: 10.1126/science.1218344.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, Celsiusstrasse 1, 28359 Bremen, Germany.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22556258" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Alphaproteobacteria/enzymology/genetics/*growth & development/metabolism ; Bacterial Proteins/genetics/metabolism ; Bacteroidetes/enzymology/genetics/*growth & development/metabolism ; Diatoms/*growth & development/metabolism ; *Ecosystem ; *Eutrophication ; Gammaproteobacteria/enzymology/genetics/*growth & development/metabolism ; Glycoside Hydrolases/genetics/metabolism ; Membrane Proteins/genetics/metabolism ; Membrane Transport Proteins/genetics/metabolism ; Metagenome ; Microbial Interactions ; North Sea ; Phosphates/metabolism ; Phytoplankton/*growth & development/metabolism ; Seawater/*microbiology ; Sulfatases/genetics/metabolism
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 3
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    PANGAEA
    In:  Supplement to: Krause, Evamaria; Wichels, Antje; Erler, Rene; Gerdts, Gunnar (2013): Study on the effects of near-future ocean acidification on marine yeasts: a microcosm approach. Helgoland Marine Research, 67(4), 607-621, https://doi.org/10.1007/s10152-013-0348-1
    Publication Date: 2020-01-17
    Description: Marine yeasts play an important role in biodegradation and nutrient cycling and are often associated with marine flora and fauna. They show maximum growth at pH levels lower than present-day seawater pH. Thus, contrary to many other marine organisms, they may actually profit from ocean acidification. Hence, we conducted a microcosm study, incubating natural seawater from the North Sea at present-day pH (8.10) and two near-future pH levels (7.81 and 7.67). Yeasts were isolated from the initial seawater sample and after 2 and 4 weeks of incubation. Isolates were classified by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) and representative isolates were identified by partial sequencing of the large subunit rRNA gene. From the initial seawater sample, we predominantly isolated a yeast-like filamentous fungus related to Aureobasidium pullulans, Cryptococcus sp., Candida sake, and various cold-adapted yeasts. After incubation, we found more different yeast species at near-future pH levels than at present-day pH. Yeasts reacting to low pH were related to Leucosporidium scottii, Rhodotorula mucilaginosa, Cryptococcus sp., and Debaryomyces hansenii. Our results suggest that these yeasts will benefit from seawater pH reductions and give a first indication that the importance of yeasts will increase in a more acidic ocean.
    Type: Dataset
    Format: application/zip, 2 datasets
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  • 4
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    PANGAEA
    In:  Alfred Wegener Institute, Helmholtz Centre for Polar and Marine Research, Bremerhaven
    Publication Date: 2020-01-17
    Type: Dataset
    Format: text/tab-separated-values, 3146 data points
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  • 5
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    PANGAEA
    In:  Supplement to: Bussmann, Ingeborg; Hackbusch, Steffen; Schaal, Patrick; Wichels, Antje (2017): Methane distribution and oxidation around the Lena Delta in summer 2013. Biogeosciences, 14(21), 4985-5002, https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-14-4985-2017
    Publication Date: 2020-01-17
    Description: The Lena River is one of the biggest Russian rivers draining into the Laptev Sea. Due to predicted increasing temperatures, the permafrost areas surrounding the Lena Delta will melt at increasing rates. With this melting, high amounts of methane will reach the waters of the Lena and the adjacent Laptev Sea. Methane oxidation by methanotrophic bacteria is the only biological way to reduce methane concentrations within the system. However, the polar estuary of the Lena River is a challenging environment for bacteria, with strong fluctuations in salinity and temperature. We determined the activity (tracer method) and the abundance (qPCR) of aerobic methanotrophic bacteria. We described the methanotrophic population with MISA; as well as the methane distribution (head space) and other abiotic parameters in the Lena Delta in September 2013. In 'riverine water' (S 〈5) we found a median methane concentration of 22 nM, in 'mixed water' (5 〈 S 〈 20) the median methane concentration was 19 nM and in 'polar water' (S 〉 20) a median 28 nM was observed. The Lena River was not the methane source for surface water, and bottom water methane concentrations were mainly influenced by the concentration in surface sediments. However, the methane oxidation rate in riverine and polar water was very similar (0.419 and 0.400 nM/d), but with a higher relative abundance of methanotrophs and a higher 'estimated diversity' with respect to MISA OTUs in the 'rivine water' as compared to 'polar water'. The turnover times of methane ranged from 167 d in 'mixed water', 91 d in 'riverine water' and only 36 d in 'polarwater'. Also the environmental parameters influencing the methane oxidation rate and the methanotrophic population differed between the water masses. Thus we postulate a riverine methanotrophic population limited by sub-optimal temperatures and substrate concentrations and a polar methanotrophic population being well adapted to the cold and methane poor environment, but limited by the nitrogen content. The diffusive methane flux into the atmosphere ranged from 4 -163 µmol m2 d-1 (median 24). For the total methane inventory of the investigated area, the diffusive methane flux was responsible for 8% loss, compared to only 1% of the methane consumed by the methanotrophic bacteria within the system.
    Type: Dataset
    Format: text/tab-separated-values, 180 data points
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  • 6
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    PANGAEA
    In:  Alfred Wegener Institute, Helmholtz Centre for Polar and Marine Research, Bremerhaven
    Publication Date: 2020-01-17
    Type: Dataset
    Format: text/tab-separated-values, 658 data points
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  • 7
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    PANGAEA
    In:  Alfred Wegener Institute, Helmholtz Centre for Polar and Marine Research, Bremerhaven
    Publication Date: 2020-01-17
    Type: Dataset
    Format: text/tab-separated-values, 518 data points
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  • 8
    Publication Date: 2019-07-16
    Description: Dynamics and impact of marine bioaerosols are still poorly understood. The sojourn time of airborne microorganisms can last to several days, so even transcontinental transport is likely to occur. Only little is known about bacterial communities of marine bioaerosol in terms of diversity community composition. Few recent studies showed that bioaerosols often exhibited a similar bacterial community as the subjacent ecosystems. We combined two different sampling strategies in our recent investigation. In order to elucidate the spatial variation, 36 samples were gathered during a ship cruise from the North Sea to the Baltic Sea in August 2011 using an impingement sampler (XMX/2L-MIL, Dycor, Canada). Furthermore, a one year survey is conducted to investigate temporal variation of bioaerosols at the offshore island Helgoland (German Bight, North Sea). The s amples were analysed with culture independent molecular methods. Quantification was carried out using q-PCR and C-FLAPS analysis. The community structure was analysed with ARISA-fingerprints. Phylogenetic analysis was performed via 454 16S tag-sequencing. First results showed high variation in spatial distributions, concerning the concentration of airborne bacteria, ranging from 10² to 105 cells per m-³. This is probably explained by the origin of sampled air parcels, correlated to the calculated backward trajectories, which also showed high variation. These results will be integrated within the context of the 454 sequencing data. Furthermore, results of the temporal aspect will be shown for the first time.
    Repository Name: EPIC Alfred Wegener Institut
    Type: Conference , NonPeerReviewed
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  • 9
    Publication Date: 2019-03-08
    Description: A recent investigation of bacterioplankton communities in the German Bight towards the end of a diatom-dominated spring phytoplankton bloom revealed pronounced successions of distinct bacterial clades. A combination of metagenomics and metaproteomics indicated that these clades had distinct substrate spectra and consumed different algal substrates. In this study we re-analyzed samples from the initial study by total community RNA (metatranscriptomics) and 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing. This complementary approach provided new insights into the community composition and expressed genes as well as the assessment of metabolic activity levels of distinct clades. Flavobacteria (genera Ulvibacter, Formosa, and Polaribacter), Alphaproteobacteria (SAR11 clade and Rhodobacteraceae) and Gammaproteobacteria (genus Reinekea and SAR92 clade) were the most abundant taxa. Mapping of the metatranscriptome data on assembled and taxonomically classified metagenome data of the same samples substantiated that Formosa and Polaribacter acted as major algal polymer degraders, whereas Rhodobacteraceae and Reinekea spp. exhibited less specialized substrate spectra. In addition, we found that members of the Rhodobacteraceae and SAR92 clade showed high metabolic activity levels, which suggests that these clades played a more important role during the bloom event as indicated by their in situ abundances.
    Repository Name: EPIC Alfred Wegener Institut
    Type: Article , NonPeerReviewed
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  • 10
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    Vereinigung für Angewandte und Allgemeine Mikrobiologie
    Publication Date: 2014-10-13
    Description: Rivers represent a transition zone between terrestrial and aquatic environments, as well as a transition zone between methane rich and methane poor environments. Methane concentrations are generally higher in freshwater systems than in marine systems. The Elbe River is one of the crucial drainages into the North Sea and by this high amounts of methane are imported into the marine water column. Oxidation of methane by aerobic methanotrophic bacteria is the major biological sink. Six cruises from November 2013 until June 2014 were conducted along the salinity gradient from Hamburg towards Helgoland. Methane oxidation rate was measured with radiotracers and the abundance of methanotrophic bacteria was assessed via real-time PCR. A newly designed primer targeting the genomic sequence encoding the α-subunit of the functional pMMO enzyme in water column organisms was amplified and tested against the conventional primer set. At the marine stations the cell number was relatively stable with 3 x 104 cells per L, while in the Elbe cell numbers ranged between 103 – 106 cells per L. Environmental parameters (temperature, salinity, SPM) seemed to have no influence on the abundance. However the interaction between activity and abundance seemed to be more complex.
    Repository Name: EPIC Alfred Wegener Institut
    Type: Conference , NonPeerReviewed
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