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  • 1
    Publication Date: 2013-08-31
    Description: A 1/8-scale model of the X-29A airplane was tested in the Ames 12-Foot Pressure Wind Tunnel at a Mach number of 0.20 and Reynolds numbers of 0.13 x 10 to the 6th power to 2.00 x 10 to the 6th power based on a fuselage forebody depth of 0.4 ft, For the test series presented herein, the angle of attack ranged from 40 deg. to 90 deg. and the angle of sideslip ranged from -10 deg. to 30 deg. for the erect attitude. Tests with the model inverted covered angles of attack from -40 deg. to -90 deg. and angles of sideslip from -30 deg. to 10 deg. Data were obtained for the basic design and for several forebody strakes. An alternate forebody design was also tested. The results provided information for selection of forebody strakes for compensation of Reynolds number effect on the 1/25-scale free-spinning model tested in the Langley Spin Tunnel.
    Keywords: AERODYNAMICS
    Type: L-15919 , NAS 1.15:87722 , NASA-TM-87722
    Format: application/pdf
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  • 2
    Publication Date: 2013-08-31
    Description: A spin-tunnel investigation of the spin and recovery characteristics of a 1/25-scale model to the General Dynamics F-16XL aircraft was conducted in the Langley Spin Tunnel. Tests included erect and inverted spins at various symmetric and asymmetric loading conditions. The required size of an emergency spin-recovery parachute was determined.
    Keywords: AERODYNAMICS
    Type: L-15616 , NASA-TM-85660 , NAS 1.15:85660
    Format: application/pdf
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  • 3
    Publication Date: 2017-10-02
    Description: Recent research is highlighted which was conducted at the NASA Langley Research Center on two high angle-of-attack flight dynamic phenomena which are dominated by unsteady aerodynamic effects: wing rock and tumbling. Studies of wing rock induced by strong vortical flows and tumbling characteristics observed on an advanced configuration are reviewed. Results of wind tunnel experiments are summarized and the aerodynamic mechanisms involved in the phenomena were discussed.
    Keywords: AERODYNAMICS
    Type: AGARD Unsteady Aerodynamics-Fundamentals and Applications to Aircraft Dynamics; 25 p
    Format: text
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  • 4
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    In:  CASI
    Publication Date: 2016-03-09
    Description: A device which corrects aerodynamic spin is provided in which a collapsible boom extends an aircraft moment arm and an anti-spin parachute force is exerted upon the end of the moment arm to correct intentional or inadvertent aerodynamic spin. This configuration effects spin recovery by means of a parachute whose required diameter decreases as an inverse function of the increasing length of the moment arm. The collapsible boom enables the parachute to avoid the aircraft wake without mechanical assistance, retracts to permit steep takeoff, and permits a parachute to correct spin while minimizing associated aerodynamic, structural and in-flight complications.
    Keywords: AIRCRAFT DESIGN, TESTING AND PERFORMANCE
    Type: NAS 1.71:LAR-12979-1
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  • 5
    Publication Date: 2011-08-24
    Description: Results from an investigation to determine the low-speed tumbling characteristics of twelve generic flying-wing models are summarized. There is a concern that airplanes with flying-wing planforms could inadvertently enter an out-of-control tumbling motion under certain conditions. The objectives of this investigation were to: 1) identify the geometric and mass-related parameters that cause flying wings to be capable of sustained tumbling, 2) analyze some of the driving mechanisms that cause tumbling, and 3) determine the feasibility of using computer simulations to predict the tumbling characteristics of flying wings. Free-tumble and free-to-pitch tests were conducted with dynamically-scaled, generic flying wing models. The use of computer simulations as a predictive tool for tumbling was explored. Results indicated that center-of-gravity location, mass distribution, and geometric aspect ratio strongly affected the tumbling characteristics of the models tested and that positive static stability did not necessarily preclude tumbling. The magnitude of dynamic effects were found to be of the same order as static effects for the models undergoing autorotation-in-pitch. The simulations indicated that the dynamic terms in the equations of motion used to predict tumbling must be obtained using experimental methods that account for the large amplitude/high pitch-rate environment that characterizes tumbling.
    Keywords: AIRCRAFT STABILITY AND CONTROL
    Type: AIAA PAPER 93-3615 , In: AIAA Atmospheric Flight Mechanics Conference, Monterey, CA, Aug. 9-11, 1993, Technical Papers (A93-48301 20-08); p. 1-11.
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  • 6
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    In:  Other Sources
    Publication Date: 2011-08-18
    Description: Costs and complexity of parachute system greatly reduced. Rigidtowline parachute system operates in three steps: (1) When aircraft begins to spin, parachute compartment opened up, and parachute unfolds; (2) Parachute deployed and spin terminated; and (3) Parachute released. Advantage of towline system allows use of much smaller parachute, reducing design loads on structural reinforcement. Also, complex pyrotechnic-deployment or jettison systems no longer necessary.
    Keywords: MACHINERY
    Type: LAR-12979 , NASA Tech Briefs (ISSN 0145-319X); 8; 4; P. 539
    Format: text
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  • 7
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    In:  CASI
    Publication Date: 2013-08-31
    Description: The potential effectiveness of rockets as an auxiliary means for an aircraft to effect recovery from spins was investigated. The advances in rocket technology produced by the space effort suggested that currently available systems might obviate many of the problems encountered in earlier rocket systems. A modern fighter configuration known to exhibit a flat spin mode was selected. An analytical study was made of the thrust requirements for a rocket spin recovery system for the subject configuration. These results were then applied to a preliminary systems study of rocket components appropriate to the problem. Subsequent spin tunnel tests were run to evaluate the analytical results.
    Keywords: AIRCRAFT STABILITY AND CONTROL
    Type: NASA-CR-159240
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  • 8
    Publication Date: 2011-08-18
    Description: A sustained autorotative pitching motion usually called 'tumbling' has been observed during dynamic model tests of the X-29A configuration. The X-29 is an advanced design incorporating forward-swept wings and canards in a highly relaxed static stability condition. Beginning with a historical review of the tumbling phenomenon, this paper discusses the current experimental results of dynamic model tumbling tests of the X-29 and the initial efforts to establish an aerodynamic and mathematical model for analysis.
    Keywords: AIRCRAFT STABILITY AND CONTROL
    Type: AIAA PAPER 84-2108
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  • 9
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    In:  Other Sources
    Publication Date: 2019-07-27
    Description: The requirements generated by the loss-of-control problems of contemporary and future aircraft are discussed in connection with the development of rocket and parachute technology for spin-recovery systems used in current aircraft. Recovery rockets must be designed to provide the thrust (not impulse) levels required by the specific application, because insufficient thrust will not effect a recovery regardless of its duration. The need for long firing times and a restart capability make liquid rocket systems preferable. Alternatives to the current tail-mounted method of implementing parachute systems include: nose chutes, wing-tip parachutes, dual-bridle and rigid towline systems. Comparative test results for these and the conventional system are given along with the latest dynamic model test technique for spin-recovery rockets.
    Keywords: AIRCRAFT STABILITY AND CONTROL
    Type: Symposium on Flight Testing Technology - A State of the Art Review; Sept. 19-22, 1982; New York, NY
    Format: text
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