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  • 1
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    PANGAEA
    In:  Supplement to: Shama, Lisa N S; Mark, Felix Christopher; Strobel, Anneli; Lokmer, Ana; John, Uwe; Wegner, K Mathias (2016): Transgenerational effects persist down the maternal line in marine sticklebacks: gene expression matches physiology in a warming ocean. Evolutionary Applications, 9(9), 1096-1111, https://doi.org/10.1111/eva.12370
    Publication Date: 2020-12-05
    Description: Transgenerational effects can buffer populations against environmental change, yet little is known about underlying mechanisms, their persistence, or the influence of environmental cue timing. We investigated mitochondrial respiratory capacity (MRC) and gene expression of marine sticklebacks that experienced acute or developmental acclimation to simulated ocean warming (21°C) across three generations. Previous work showed that acute acclimation of grandmothers to 21°C led to lower (optimised) offspring MRCs. Here, developmental acclimation of mothers to 21°C led to higher, but more efficient offspring MRCs. Offspring with a 21°Cx17°C grandmother-mother environment mismatch showed metabolic compensation: their MRCs were as low as offspring with a 17°C thermal history across generations. Transcriptional analyses showed primarily maternal but also grandmaternal environment effects: genes involved in metabolism and mitochondrial protein biosynthesis were differentially expressed when mothers developed at 21°C, whereas 21°C grandmothers influenced genes involved in hemostasis and apoptosis. Genes involved in mitochondrial respiration all showed higher expression when mothers developed at 21° and lower expression in the 21°Cx17°C group, matching the phenotypic pattern for MRCs. Our study links transcriptomics to physiology under climate change, and demonstrates that mechanisms underlying transgenerational effects persist across multiple generations with specific outcomes depending on acclimation type and environmental mismatch between generations.
    Keywords: Electron transport system capacity, maximum; Gasterosteus aculeatus, acclimation temperature, maternal; Group; Net phosphorylation efficiency; Phosphorylation inefficiency; Phosphorylation system capacity, maximum; Replicates; Temperature, rearing
    Type: Dataset
    Format: text/tab-separated-values, 380 data points
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  • 2
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    PANGAEA
    In:  Supplement to: Shama, Lisa N S; Wegner, K Mathias (2014): Grandparental effects in marine sticklebacks: transgenerational plasticity across multiple generations. Journal of Evolutionary Biology, 27(11), 2297-2307, https://doi.org/10.1111/jeb.12490
    Publication Date: 2021-05-21
    Description: Nongenetic inheritance mechanisms such as transgenerational plasticity (TGP) can buffer populations against rapid environmental change such as ocean warming. Yet, little is known about how long these effects persist and whether they are cumulative over generations. Here, we tested for adaptive TGP in response to simulated ocean warming across parental and grandparental generations of marine sticklebacks. Grandparents were acclimated for two months during reproductive conditioning, whereas parents experienced developmental acclimation, allowing us to compare the fitness consequences of short-term vs. prolonged exposure to elevated temperature across multiple generations. We found that reproductive output of F1 adults was primarily determined by maternal developmental temperature, but carry-over effects from grandparental acclimation environments resulted in cumulative negative effects of elevated temperature on hatching success. In very early stages of growth, F2 offspring reached larger sizes in their respective paternal and grandparental environment down the paternal line, suggesting that other factors than just the paternal genome may be transferred between generations. In later growth stages, maternal and maternal granddam environments strongly influenced offspring body size, but in opposing directions, indicating that the mechanism(s) underlying the transfer of environmental information may have differed between acute and developmental acclimation experienced by the two generations. Taken together, our results suggest that the fitness consequences of parental and grandparental TGP are highly context dependent, but will play an important role in mediating some of the impacts of rapid climate change in this system.
    Keywords: AWI_Coast; Coastal Ecology @ AWI
    Type: Dataset
    Format: application/zip, 6 datasets
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  • 3
    Publication Date: 2020-12-05
    Keywords: Blast like cells; Day of experiment; Granulocytes; Hemocytes, total; Hyalinocytes; Sample ID; Treatment: parasite infection; Treatment: temperature; Treatment: vibrio infection; Vibrio
    Type: Dataset
    Format: text/tab-separated-values, 1240 data points
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  • 4
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    PANGAEA
    In:  Supplement to: Schade, Franziska M; Shama, Lisa N S; Wegner, K Mathias (2014): Impact of thermal stress on evolutionary trajectories of pathogen resistance in three-spined stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus). BMC Evolutionary Biology, 14(1), 164, https://doi.org/10.1186/s12862-014-0164-5
    Publication Date: 2020-12-05
    Description: Background: Pathogens are a major regulatory force for host populations, especially under stressful conditions. Elevated temperatures may enhance the development of pathogens, increase the number of transmission stages, and can negatively influence host susceptibility depending on host thermal tolerance. As a net result, this can lead to a higher prevalence of epidemics during summer months. These conditions also apply to marine ecosystems, where possible ecological impacts and the population-specific potential for evolutionary responses to changing environments and increasing disease prevalence are, however, less known. Therefore, we investigated the influence of thermal stress on the evolutionary trajectories of disease resistance in three marine populations of three-spined sticklebacks Gasterosteus aculeatus by combining the effects of elevated temperature and infection with a bacterial strain of Vibrio sp. using a common garden experiment. Results: We found that thermal stress had an impact on fish weight and especially on survival after infection after only short periods of thermal acclimation. Environmental stress reduced genetic differentiation (QST) between populations by releasing cryptic within-population variation. While life history traits displayed positive genetic correlations across environments with relatively weak genotype by environment interactions (GxE), environmental stress led to negative genetic correlations across environments in pathogen resistance. This reversal of genetic effects governing resistance is probably attributable to changing environment-dependent virulence mechanisms of the pathogen interacting differently with host genotypes, i.e. GPathogenxGHostxE or (GPathogenxE)x(GHostxE) interactions, rather than to pure host genetic effects, i.e. GHostxE interactions. Conclusion: To cope with climatic changes and the associated increase in pathogen virulence, host species require wide thermal tolerances and pathogen-resistant genotypes. The higher resistance we found for some families at elevated temperatures showed that there is evolutionary potential for resistance to Vibrio sp. in both thermal environments. The negative genetic correlation of pathogen resistance between thermal environments, on the other hand, indicates that adaptation to current conditions can be a weak predictor for performance in changing environments. The observed feedback on selective gradients exerted on life history traits may exacerbate this effect, as it can also modify the response to selection for other vital components of fitness.
    Type: Dataset
    Format: application/zip, 2 datasets
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  • 5
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    PANGAEA
    In:  Supplement to: Demann, Felicitas; Wegner, K Mathias (2018): Infection by invasive parasites increases susceptibility of native hosts to secondary infection via modulation of cellular immunity. Journal of Animal Ecology, 88(3), 427-438, https://doi.org/10.1111/1365-2656.12939
    Publication Date: 2020-12-05
    Description: Blue mussel Mytilus edulis were infected by Mytilicola intestinalis in a full factorial experimental design combining the following treatments: Mytilicola infection treatment (M_infect: infected with Mytilicola, M_control: not infected with Mytilicola) Vibrio infection treatment (V_bath: bathing challenge, V_inject: injection challenge, V_control: no vibrio infection) Temperature treatment (values 17: ambient, 21: elevated) Response variables were: composition of hemolymph cell types (granulocytes, hyalinocytes, blast-like cells) phagocytosis activity of each cell type Vibrio load in the hemolymph measured as colony forming units on TCBS agar in 5 µl of hemolmyph after 24h of growth at room temperature.
    Type: Dataset
    Format: application/zip, 2 datasets
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  • 6
    Publication Date: 2021-05-21
    Keywords: Allele lengths locus; AWI_Coast; Coastal Ecology @ AWI; Date/Time of event; DB; Diedrichsenbank; Event label; HAND; Latitude of event; Longitude of event; Oddewatt; OW; PK; Puan Klent; Sample code/label; Sampling by hand; Sylter Wattenmeer; Treatment
    Type: Dataset
    Format: text/tab-separated-values, 435 data points
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  • 7
    Publication Date: 2021-05-21
    Keywords: AWI_Coast; Coastal Ecology @ AWI; Date/Time of event; DB; Diedrichsenbank; Event label; HAND; Latitude of event; Longitude of event; Oddewatt; Operational taxonomic unit; OW; PK; Puan Klent; Sample code/label; Sampling by hand; Sylter Wattenmeer; Treatment
    Type: Dataset
    Format: text/tab-separated-values, 26628 data points
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  • 8
    Publication Date: 2021-05-21
    Keywords: AWI_Coast; Bacteria; Coastal Ecology @ AWI; DATE/TIME; German Bight Wadden Sea; Identification; Season; Species, common name; Sylt-Rømø-Bight
    Type: Dataset
    Format: text/tab-separated-values, 1336 data points
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  • 9
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    PANGAEA
    In:  Supplement to: Wegner, K Mathias; Volkenborn, Nils; Peter, Hannes; Eiler, Alexander (2013): Disturbance induced decoupling between host genetics and composition of the associated microbiome. BMC Microbiology, 13(252), https://doi.org/10.1186/1471-2180-13-252
    Publication Date: 2021-05-21
    Description: Background: Studies of oyster microbiomes have revealed that a limited number of microbes, including pathogens, can dominate microbial communities in host tissues such as gills and gut. Much of the bacterial diversity however remains underexplored and unexplained, although environmental conditions and host genetics have been implicated. We used 454 next generation 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing of individually tagged PCR reactions to explore the diversity of bacterial communities in gill tissue of the invasive Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas stemming from genetically differentiated beds under ambient outdoor conditions and after a multifaceted disturbance treatment imposing stress on the host. Results: While the gill associated microbial communities in oysters were dominated by few abundant taxa (i.e. Sphingomonas, Mycoplasma) the distribution of rare bacterial groups correlated to relatedness between the hosts under ambient conditions. Exposing the host to disturbance broke apart this relationship by removing rare phylotypes thereby reducing overall microbial diversity. Shifts in the microbiome composition in response to stress did not result in a net increase in genera known to contain potentially pathogenic strains. Conclusion: The decrease in microbial diversity and the disassociation between population genetic structure of the hosts and their associated microbiome suggest that disturbance (i.e. stress) may play a significant role for the assembly of the natural microbiome. Such community shifts may in turn also feed back on the course of disease and the occurrence of mass mortality events in oyster populations.
    Keywords: AWI_Coast; Coastal Ecology @ AWI
    Type: Dataset
    Format: application/zip, 3 datasets
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  • 10
    Publication Date: 2021-05-21
    Keywords: AWI_Coast; Coastal Ecology @ AWI; Date/Time of event; DB; Diedrichsenbank; Event label; HAND; Latitude of event; Longitude of event; Oddewatt; Operational taxonomic unit; OW; PK; Puan Klent; Sample code/label; Sampling by hand; Sylter Wattenmeer; Treatment
    Type: Dataset
    Format: text/tab-separated-values, 19782 data points
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