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  • 1
    Call number: AWI G3-19-92460
    Description / Table of Contents: The Yukon Coast in Canada is an ice-rich permafrost coast and highly sensitive to changing environmental conditions. Retrogressive thaw slumps are a common thermoerosion feature along this coast, and develop through the thawing of exposed ice-rich permafrost on slopes and removal of accumulating debris. They contribute large amounts of sediment, including organic carbon and nitrogen, to the nearshore zone. The objective of this study was to 1) identify the climatic and geomorphological drivers of sediment-meltwater release, 2) quantify the amount of released meltwater, sediment, organic carbon and nitrogen, and 3) project the evolution of sediment-meltwater release of retrogressive thaw slumps in a changing future climate. The analysis is based on data collected over 18 days in July 2013 and 18 days in August 2012. A cut-throat flume was set up in the main sediment-meltwater channel of the largest retrogressive thaw slump on Herschel Island. In addition, two weather stations, one on top of the undisturbed tundra and one on the…
    Type of Medium: Monograph available for loan
    Pages: 163 Seiten , Illustrationen, Diagramme
    Language: English
    Note: Table of Contents Abstract Kurzfassung Abbreviations and nomenclature 1. Introduction 2. Scientific Background 2.1. Permafrost 2.2.Retrogressive Thaw Slumps 2.3. Inputs of Freshwater, Sediment and Carbon into the Canadian Beaufort Sea 3. Study Area 3.1. Regional Setting: Yukon Coast and Herschel Island 3.2. Retrogressive Thaw Slumps 4. Material and Methods 4.1. Field Work 4.1.1. Terrain Photography 4.1.2. Differential Global Positioning System (DGPS) 4.1.3. Light Detection And Ranging (LiDAR) and Digital Elevation Model (DEM) 4.1.4. Micrometeorology 4.1.5. Discharge Measurement 4.1.6. Multiple Regression-Statistical Relationships between Micrometeorological Variables and Discharge 4.1.7. Sampling 4.2. Laboratory Analyses 4.2.1. Sedimentological Analyses 4.2.2. Hydrochemical Analyses 4.3. Fluxes of Sediment and (In-) Organic Matter 5. Results 5.1. Field Work 5.1.1. Terrain Photography 5.1.2. Differential Global Positioning System (DGPS) 5.1.3. Light Detecting And Ranging (LiDAR) and Digital Elevation Model (DEM) 5.1.4. Micrometeorology 5.1.5. Discharge 5.1.6. Multiple Regression - Statistical Relationships between Micrometeorology and Discharge 5.2. Laboratory Analyses 5.2.1. Sedimentological Analyses 5.2.2. Hydrochemical Analyses 5.3. Fluxes of Sediment-meltwater 6. Discussion 6.1. Microclimatological and Geomorphological Factors Controlling Discharge 6.1.1. Diurnal Variations 6.1.2. Seasonal Variations 6.2. Contribution of Retrogressive Thaw Slumps to the Sediment Budget of the Yukon Coast 6.2.1. Origin of Outflow Material 6.2.2. Slump D in the Regional Context 6.2.3. Seasonal Sediment Budget Compilation for Slump D 6.2.4. Retrogressive Thaw Slump Occurrence along the Yukon Coast 6.2.5. Input to the Beaufort Sea 6.3. Projected Climatic Change and its Impact on Retrogressive Thaw Slump Outflow 6.4. Uncertainties and Limitations 6.5. Future Research 7. Conclusion 8. Appendix 8.1. Field Work 8.1.1. Slump D's northern headwall profile 8.1.2. Collinson Head slump 8.1.3. Herschel Island West Coast slump 8.1.4. Roland Bay slump 8.1.5. Kay Point slump 8.2. Laboratory Work 8.2.1. Volumetric Ice Content 8.2.2. Grain Size 8.3. Evolution of Slump D 8.3.1. Geo Eye satellite of Slump D 8.3.2. Aerial Oblique Photography of Slump D 8.3.3. LiDAR of Slump D 8.3.4. Time Lapse Photography of Slump D's Headwall 9. References 10. Financial and technical support 11. Acknowledgement - Danksagung
    Location: AWI Reading room
    Branch Library: AWI Library
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  • 2
    Publication Date: 2015-02-27
    Description: Accelerating climate change and increased economic and environmental interest in permafrost-affected regions have resulted in an acute need for more directed permafrost research. In June 2014, 88 early career researchers convened to identify future priorities for permafrost research. This multidisciplinary forum concluded that five research topics deserve greatest attention: permafrost landscape dynamics; permafrost thermal modelling; integration of traditional knowledge; spatial analysis of permafrost types and vulnerability; and engineering issues. These topics underline the need for integrated research across a spectrum of permafrost-related domains and constitute a contribution to the Third International Conference on Arctic Research Planning (ICARP III).
    Repository Name: EPIC Alfred Wegener Institut
    Type: Article , NonPeerReviewed
    Format: application/pdf
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  • 3
    Publication Date: 2016-07-12
    Description: Apart from people in cold region communities and a small – although steadily growing – scientific community, the general public knows very little about permafrost properties, its dynamics in response to climate change, and the research going on in the field. We are addressing this by making permafrost science accessible to children, youth, their parents, and teachers. We are producing a 100% outreach-related project that aims at ‘Fostering permafrost research to the ends of the Earth’ (http://ipa.arcticportal.org), but with a casual approach via a series of comic strips. Cartoons are excellent ways to communicate messages in today’s media landscape: they are graphic, funny and direct, and can be rapidly shared via social media to reach many people. Our outreach project targets the general public, focusing on young students who have to choose career paths at the high school or college levels. By introducing them to permafrost research activities, particularly fieldwork, our ‘Frozen-Ground Cartoon’ will enhance the dissemination of permafrost knowledge and broaden the international community of permafrost ‘lovers’. This new project is coordinated by a core group of permafrost early career researchers from Canada, Germany, Sweden and Portugal (in collaboration with an ‘external senior advisor’), and is endorsed by the International Permafrost Association (IPA) as a targeted ‘Action Group’ (http://ipa.arcticportal.org/activities/action-groups). Here we present an overview of our Action Group, including main objectives, significance, and potential future outcomes.
    Repository Name: EPIC Alfred Wegener Institut
    Type: Conference , NonPeerReviewed
    Format: application/pdf
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  • 4
    Publication Date: 2017-08-07
    Description: The Yukon Coast in Canada is an ice-rich permafrost coast and highly sensitive to changing environmental conditions. Retrogressive thaw slumps are a common thermoerosion feature along this coast, and develop through the thawing of exposed ice-rich permafrost on slopes and removal of accumulating debris. They contribute large amounts of sediment, including organic carbon and nitrogen, to the nearshore zone. The objective of this study was to 1) identify the climatic and geomorphological drivers of sediment-meltwater release, 2) quantify the amount of released meltwater, sediment, organic carbon and nitrogen, and 3) project the evolution of sediment-meltwater release of retrogressive thaw slumps in a changing future climate. The analysis is based on data collected over 18 days in July 2013 and 18 days in August 2012. A cut-throat flume was set up in the main sediment-meltwater channel of the largest retrogressive thaw slump on Herschel Island. In addition, two weather stations, one on top of the undisturbed tundra and one on the slump floor, measured incoming solar radiation, air temperature, wind speed and precipitation. The discharge volume eroding from the ice-rich permafrost and retreating snowbanks was measured and compared to the meteorological data collected in real time with a resolution of one minute. The results show that the release of sediment-meltwater from thawing of the ice-rich permafrost headwall is strongly related to snowmelt, incoming solar radiation and air temperature. Snowmelt led to seasonal differences, especially due to the additional contribution of water to the eroding sediment-meltwater from headwall ablation, lead to dilution of the sediment-meltwater composition. Incoming solar radiation and air temperature were the main drivers for diurnal and inter-diurnal fluctuations. In July (2013), the retrogressive thaw slump released about 25 000 m³ of sediment-meltwater, containing 225 kg dissolved organic carbon and 2050 t of sediment, which in turn included 33 t organic carbon, and 4 t total nitrogen. In August (2012), just 15 600 m³ of sediment-meltwater was released, since there was no additional contribution from snowmelt. However, even without the additional dilution, 281 kg dissolved organic carbon was released. The sediment concentration was twice as high as in July, with sediment contents of up to 457 g l-1 and 3058 t of sediment, including 53 t organic carbon and 5 t nitrogen, being released. In addition, the data from the 36 days of observations from Slump D were upscaled to cover the main summer season of 1 July to 31 August (62 days) and to include all 229 active retrogressive thaw slumps along the Yukon Coast. In total, all retrogressive thaw slumps along the Yukon Coast contribute a minimum of 1.4 Mio. m³ sediment-meltwater each thawing season, containing a minimum of 172 000 t sediment with 3119 t organic carbon, 327 t nitrogen and 17 t dissolved organic carbon. Therefore, in addition to the coastal erosion input to the Beaufort Sea, retrogressive thaw slumps additionally release 3 % of sediment and 8 % of organic carbon into the ocean. Finally, the future evolution of retrogressive thaw slumps under a warming scenario with summer air temperatures increasing by 2-3 °C by 2081-2100, would lead to an increase of 109-114% in release of sediment-meltwater. It can be concluded that retrogressive thaw slumps are sensitive to climatic conditions and under projected future Arctic warming will contribute larger amounts of thawed permafrost material (including organic carbon and nitrogen) into the environment.
    Repository Name: EPIC Alfred Wegener Institut
    Type: Thesis , NonPeerReviewed
    Format: application/pdf
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  • 5
    Publication Date: 2017-09-22
    Description: This project started in October 2015 with a crazy idea: prepare and submit a funding application for an international, multidisciplinary and non-traditional scientific outreach project… within the next 48 hours. Well, it worked out. A group of highly motivated young researchers from Canada and Europe united to combine arts and science and produce a series of outreach comic strips about permafrost (frozen ground). The aim of the project is to present and explain scientific research conducted across the circumpolar Arctic, placing emphasis on field work and the rapidly changing northern environment. The target audience is kids, youth, parents and teachers, with the general goal of making permafrost science more fun and accessible to the public. Because guess what : permafrost represents an area of more than twenty million km2 in the Northern Hemisphere, a huge area. As the climate warms, permafrost thaws and becomes unstable for houses, roads and airports. This rapid thawing of previously frozen ground also disrupts plant and animal habitats, impacts water quality and the ecology of lakes, and releases carbon into the atmosphere as greenhouse gases, making climate change even stronger. Hence permafrost and its response to climate change concerns us all. The project received initial support from the International Permafrost Association (IPA) as a targeted ‘Action Group’, and since then several other sponsors have joined the project. Here we are, now, two years after this first idea. What you are about to read is the result of an iterative process of exchanging ideas between artists and scientists. We first made an application call and received 49 applications from artists in 16 countries. Through a formal review process, we then selected two artists to work on this project: Noémie Ross from Canada, and Heta Nääs from Finland. With input from scientists, Noémie and Heta created fantastic cartoons that explain some of the changes happening to the environment in permafrost areas, how they affect people and wildlife, and what scientists are doing to better understand these changes to help people find innovative ways to adapt. We wish everyone plenty of fun reading this booklet and we would like to thank all those who supported this project.
    Repository Name: EPIC Alfred Wegener Institut
    Type: Miscellaneous , NonPeerReviewed
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  • 6
    Publication Date: 2018-04-05
    Description: Poster Presentation about the Permafrost Comics at the Bolin Days. This is the launch of the new Bolin Centre for Climate Research after the merge of former EkoKlim and the Bolin Centre! Come and listen to interesting talks, enjoy discussions over fika, celebrate Tarfala research station 70 years, hear the latest about ICOS, attend the SWERUS photo exhibition, view interesting posters, jugde in the PhD poster competition, talk with the database team, involve yourself in the mentoring programme, rack your brain with puzzles and equip yourself with Bolin Centre give-aways. End the Bolin Days by letting your hair down at the Ceilidh dance after the relaxed conference dinner. There are also excellent opportunities to interact with the Bolin Centre External Science Advisory Group during the Bolin Days.
    Repository Name: EPIC Alfred Wegener Institut
    Type: Conference , NonPeerReviewed
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  • 7
    Publication Date: 2018-04-05
    Description: The “Frozen-Ground Cartoons” IPA Action Group has teamed up with artists Noémie Ross and Heta Nääs to come up with a series of entertaining comics aimed mainly at youth, but relevant to the general public. The comics focus on permafrost, permafrost research and the effects of climate change on northern communities and wildlife. The topics surrounding permafrost research have recently been evolving, garnering an interest to frozen-ground sensitivity and behaviour that extends beyond scientific researchers and organizations. The expression “permafrost is melting” (sic) now pops up frequently in the news, with such phenomena as “methane explosions” and “permafrost landslides” elevated to the honorable rank of click-baits on social media newsfeeds. While “permafrost” is a word now recognized by many, it is still a challenge to demystify the Arctic environment and the work that is done by researchers on this topic. The “Frozen-Ground Cartoons” address this gap between scientists and the public and are available as printed booklets (free giveaways at the poster!) and free public downloads of the comics on the website frozengroundcartoon.com. Available in English, the comics are to be translated in many languages in the near future, including northern native languages. This project was initiated exclusively from early career researchers who built on the networking opportunities of large projects such as ADAPT and PAGE21, as well as from the Arctic early career researcher groups APECS and PYRN. It is of great interest to every researcher, as outreach is now an important part of the work of scientists. The framework could also be applied to other disciplines, and we strongly hope this project can serve as an inspiration to budding outreach specialists across the ArcticNet community.
    Repository Name: EPIC Alfred Wegener Institut
    Type: Conference , NonPeerReviewed
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  • 8
    Publication Date: 2019-01-13
    Description: Dieses Projekt startete im Oktober 2015 mit einer verrückten Idee: Schreiben und Einreichen eines Antrags auf Förderung einer internationalen, multidisziplinären und nicht-traditionell wissenschaftlichen Projektinitiative… innerhalb von 48 Stunden. Und es hat geklappt ! Eine Gruppe hoch motivierter, junger Forscher aus Kanada und Europa hat sich gebildet, um Kunst und Wissenschaft zu kombinieren und eine Reihe von Comics über Permafrost (gefrorene Böden) zu produzieren. Unser Ziel ist es, zu zeigen, wie wissenschaftliches Arbeiten im hohen Norden funktioniert, mit dem Schwerpunkt auf Geländearbeit und den schnellen Umweltveränderungen in der Arktis. Die Zielgruppe sind Kinder, Jugendliche, Eltern und Lehrer, mit dem allgemeinen Ziel, Permafrost zugänglicher und mit Spaß zu vermitteln. Denn ratet mal: Permafrost ist ein Gebiet von mehr als 20 Millionen km2 auf der Nordhalbkugel – ein riesiges Gebiet. Durch die Klimaerwärmung taut der Permafrost und wird zu instabil, um Häuser, Straßen und Flughäfen zu tragen. Durch das Auftauen von gefrorenem Boden werden außerdem Pflanzen- und Tierhabitate zerstört, die Wasserqualität und Ökologie von Seen beeinflusst und auf Grund der Freisetzung von Kohlenstoff als Treibhausgas in die Atmosphäre wird der Klimawandel sogar verstärkt. Daher betrifft Permafrost und seine Reaktion auf den Klimawandel uns alle. Die Internationale Permafrost Gemeinschaft (IPA) hat das Projekt als „Action Group“ von Beginn an unterstützt und seitdem sind noch viele weitere Sponsoren dazugekommen. Und hier sind wir nun: Zwei Jahre nach der ersten Idee. Ihr seid kurz davor das zu lesen, was das Ergebnis eines ständigen Austauschs zwischen Künstlern und Wissenschaftlern ist. Zunächst hatten wir eine Ausschreibungsrunde und erhielten 49 Bewerbungen von Künstlern aus 16 Ländern. Durch ein Bewertungsverfahren wählten wir zwei Künstlerinnen aus, um an diesem Projekt zu arbeiten: Noémie Ross aus Kanada und Heta Nääs aus Finnland. Mit den Beiträgen von Wissenschaftlern erstellten Noémie und Heta fantastische Cartoons, die ein paar der Veränderungen erklären, die in Permafrost-Gebieten passieren. Zum Beispiel: wie wird die Welt der Menschen und Tiere beeinflusst und was machen Forscher, um diese Prozesse besser zu verstehen, sodass sie den Einheimischen helfen können, innovative Wege zur Anpassung zu finden.
    Repository Name: EPIC Alfred Wegener Institut
    Type: Miscellaneous , NonPeerReviewed
    Format: application/pdf
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  • 9
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    PANGAEA
    In:  Alfred Wegener Institute - Research Unit Potsdam
    Publication Date: 2018-10-08
    Type: Dataset
    Format: text/tab-separated-values, 146685 data points
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  • 10
    Publication Date: 2018-10-08
    Type: Dataset
    Format: text/tab-separated-values, 957 data points
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