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  • 1
    Call number: AWI G3-19-92460
    Description / Table of Contents: The Yukon Coast in Canada is an ice-rich permafrost coast and highly sensitive to changing environmental conditions. Retrogressive thaw slumps are a common thermoerosion feature along this coast, and develop through the thawing of exposed ice-rich permafrost on slopes and removal of accumulating debris. They contribute large amounts of sediment, including organic carbon and nitrogen, to the nearshore zone. The objective of this study was to 1) identify the climatic and geomorphological drivers of sediment-meltwater release, 2) quantify the amount of released meltwater, sediment, organic carbon and nitrogen, and 3) project the evolution of sediment-meltwater release of retrogressive thaw slumps in a changing future climate. The analysis is based on data collected over 18 days in July 2013 and 18 days in August 2012. A cut-throat flume was set up in the main sediment-meltwater channel of the largest retrogressive thaw slump on Herschel Island. In addition, two weather stations, one on top of the undisturbed tundra and one on the…
    Type of Medium: Monograph available for loan
    Pages: 163 Seiten , Illustrationen, Diagramme
    Language: English
    Note: Table of Contents Abstract Kurzfassung Abbreviations and nomenclature 1. Introduction 2. Scientific Background 2.1. Permafrost 2.2.Retrogressive Thaw Slumps 2.3. Inputs of Freshwater, Sediment and Carbon into the Canadian Beaufort Sea 3. Study Area 3.1. Regional Setting: Yukon Coast and Herschel Island 3.2. Retrogressive Thaw Slumps 4. Material and Methods 4.1. Field Work 4.1.1. Terrain Photography 4.1.2. Differential Global Positioning System (DGPS) 4.1.3. Light Detection And Ranging (LiDAR) and Digital Elevation Model (DEM) 4.1.4. Micrometeorology 4.1.5. Discharge Measurement 4.1.6. Multiple Regression-Statistical Relationships between Micrometeorological Variables and Discharge 4.1.7. Sampling 4.2. Laboratory Analyses 4.2.1. Sedimentological Analyses 4.2.2. Hydrochemical Analyses 4.3. Fluxes of Sediment and (In-) Organic Matter 5. Results 5.1. Field Work 5.1.1. Terrain Photography 5.1.2. Differential Global Positioning System (DGPS) 5.1.3. Light Detecting And Ranging (LiDAR) and Digital Elevation Model (DEM) 5.1.4. Micrometeorology 5.1.5. Discharge 5.1.6. Multiple Regression - Statistical Relationships between Micrometeorology and Discharge 5.2. Laboratory Analyses 5.2.1. Sedimentological Analyses 5.2.2. Hydrochemical Analyses 5.3. Fluxes of Sediment-meltwater 6. Discussion 6.1. Microclimatological and Geomorphological Factors Controlling Discharge 6.1.1. Diurnal Variations 6.1.2. Seasonal Variations 6.2. Contribution of Retrogressive Thaw Slumps to the Sediment Budget of the Yukon Coast 6.2.1. Origin of Outflow Material 6.2.2. Slump D in the Regional Context 6.2.3. Seasonal Sediment Budget Compilation for Slump D 6.2.4. Retrogressive Thaw Slump Occurrence along the Yukon Coast 6.2.5. Input to the Beaufort Sea 6.3. Projected Climatic Change and its Impact on Retrogressive Thaw Slump Outflow 6.4. Uncertainties and Limitations 6.5. Future Research 7. Conclusion 8. Appendix 8.1. Field Work 8.1.1. Slump D's northern headwall profile 8.1.2. Collinson Head slump 8.1.3. Herschel Island West Coast slump 8.1.4. Roland Bay slump 8.1.5. Kay Point slump 8.2. Laboratory Work 8.2.1. Volumetric Ice Content 8.2.2. Grain Size 8.3. Evolution of Slump D 8.3.1. Geo Eye satellite of Slump D 8.3.2. Aerial Oblique Photography of Slump D 8.3.3. LiDAR of Slump D 8.3.4. Time Lapse Photography of Slump D's Headwall 9. References 10. Financial and technical support 11. Acknowledgement - Danksagung
    Location: AWI Reading room
    Branch Library: AWI Library
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  • 2
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    In:  Alfred Wegener Institute - Research Unit Potsdam
    Publication Date: 2019-01-26
    Type: Dataset
    Format: text/tab-separated-values, 361 data points
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  • 3
    Publication Date: 2016-07-11
    Description: Over the past two decades, the International Arctic Science Committee (IASC) and the Scientific Committee on Antarctic Research (SCAR) have organized activities focused on international and interdisciplinary perspectives for advancing Arctic and Antarctic research cooperation and knowledge dissemination in many areas (e.g. Kennicutt et al., 2014). For permafrost science, however, no consensus document exists at the international level to identify future research priorities, although the International Permafrost Association (IPA) highlighted the need for such a document during the 10th International Conference on Permafrost in 2012. Four years later, this presentation, which is based on the results obtained by Fritz et al. (2015), outlines the outcome of an international and interdisciplinary effort conducted by early career researchers (ECRs). This effort was designed as a contribution to the Third International Conference on Arctic Research Planning (ICARP III). In June 2014, 88 ERCs convened during the Fourth European Conference on Permafrost to identify future priorities for permafrost research. We aimed to meet our goals of hosting an effective large group dialogue by means of online question development followed by a “World Café” conversational process. An overview of the process is provided in Figure 1. This activity was organized by the two major early career researcher associations Permafrost Young Researchers’ Network (PYRN) and the Association of Polar Early career Scientists (APECS), as well as the regional research projects PAGE21 (EU) and ADAPT (Canada). Participants were provided with live instructions including criteria regarding what makes a research question (Sutherland et al., 2011). The top five questions that emerged from this process are: (1) How does permafrost degradation affect landscape dynamics at different spatial and temporal scales? (2) How can ground thermal models be improved to better reflect permafrost dynamics at high spatial resolution? (3) How can traditional environmental knowledge be integrated in permafrost research? (4) What is the spatial distribution of different ground-ice types and how susceptible is ice-rich permafrost to future environmental change? (5) What is the influence of infrastructures on the thermal regime and stability of permafrost in different environmental settings? As the next generation of permafrost researchers, we see the need and the opportunity to participate in framing the future research priorities. Across the polar sciences, ECRs have built powerful networks, such as the Association of Polar Early Career Scientists (APECS) and the Permafrost Young Researchers Network (PYRN), which have enabled us to efficiently consult with the community. Many participants of this community-input exercise will be involved in and also affected by the Arctic science priorities during the next decade. Therefore, we need to (i) contribute our insights into larger efforts of the community such as the Permafrost Research Priorities initiative by the Climate and Cryosphere (CliC) project together with the IPA and (ii) help identify relevant gaps and a suitable roadmap for the future of Arctic research. Critical evaluation of the progress made since ICARP II and revisiting the science plans and recommendations will be crucial. IASC and the IPA, together with SCAR on bipolar activities, should coordinate the research agendas in a proactive manner engaging all partners, including funding agencies, policy makers, and local communities. Communicating our main findings to society in a dialogue between researchers and the public is a priority. Special attention must be given to indigenous peoples living on permafrost, where knowledge exchange creates a mutual benefit for science and local communities. The ICARP III process is an opportunity to better communicate the global importance of permafrost to policy makers and the public.
    Repository Name: EPIC Alfred Wegener Institut
    Type: Conference , NonPeerReviewed
    Format: application/pdf
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  • 4
    Publication Date: 2018-04-05
    Description: Communicating science about a phenomenon found under ground and defined by its thermal properties in an easy, fun, and engaging way, can be a challenge. Two years ago, a group of young researchers from Canada and Europe united to tackle this problem by combining arts and science to produce a series of outreach comic strips about permafrost (frozen ground). Because this concerns us all. As the climate warms, permafrost thaws and becomes unstable for houses, roads and airports.The thawing also disrupts ecosystems, impacts water quality, and releases greenhouse gases into the atmosphere, making climate change even stronger. The Frozen Ground Cartoon project aims to present and explain permafrost research, placing emphasis on field work and the rapidly changing northern environment. The target audience is kids, youth, parents and teachers, with the general goal of making permafrost science more fun and accessible to the public. The project has so far produced 22 pages of comics through an iterative process of exchanging ideas between two artists and thirteen scientists. The project artists were selected through an application call that received 49 applications from artists in 16 countries. With input from scientists, artists Noémie Ross (Canada) and Heta Nääs (Finland) have created a set of beautiful, artistic, humoristic, and pedagogic comics.. The comics are available for free download through the project web page (in English and Swedish), and printed copies have so far been handed out to school kids and general public in Europe. Prints in North America are planned for the fall of 2017. The next steps of the project are (1) to distribute the comics as wide as possible, (2) work towards translations into more languages, and (3) to evaluate the effectiveness of the science communication through the comics, in collaboration with schools and pedagogic experts.
    Repository Name: EPIC Alfred Wegener Institut
    Type: Conference , NonPeerReviewed
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  • 5
    Publication Date: 2018-04-05
    Description: Presentation of Permafrost Comics at the Polarforum. Polarforum is a meeting place for all those engaged in research concerning, or in, the polar regions, the Swedish mountain region and other Northern regions. The aim is to create transdisciplinary interfaces between researchers, the Swedish Polar Research Secretariat and other actors through work groups and networking. Government officials and others are welcome as observers. Polarforum currently has just over 300 members from some 40 Swedish seats of learning.
    Repository Name: EPIC Alfred Wegener Institut
    Type: Conference , NonPeerReviewed
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  • 6
    Publication Date: 2018-04-05
    Description: Here we present the first results of an entertaining and easily understandable scientific-based comic on the impacts of climate change in permafrost areas. Education and outreach is a fundamental component of scientific research activities. Especially for Arctic science, the involvement of local communities and the diffusion of scientific knowledge in schools is now an essential task on every researcher’s to-do list. The International Permafrost Association (IPA) Action Groups “A Frozen-Ground Cartoon” and “Permafrost and Culture” aim at filling the gap between indigenous knowledge, complex scientific results and outreach to the general public. It is possible to change global thinking, especially in relation to environmental friendly policy and industry, but only if awareness to the sensitive Arctic regions can be brought to the general public and to political decision makers. This can be hard to achieve, as scientific publications and knowledge are difficult to access for the general public. Permafrost comics explain the impact of climate change in permafrost areas, its effects on local communities, 172 ASM2016 Conference Program Oral Presentation and Poster Abstracts wildlife and changing landscape. We provide handouts with simple scientific background information that can be used by school teachers as educational material. The comics are part of a larger outreach and education project including posters and a short Frostbyte video. Everything will be freely available on the IPA website for download. For more information: https://www. researchgate.net/project/A-Frozen-Ground-CartoonExplaining-international-permafrost-research-usingcomic-strips http://ipa.arcticportal.org/activities/actiongroups
    Repository Name: EPIC Alfred Wegener Institut
    Type: Conference , NonPeerReviewed
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  • 7
    Publication Date: 2013-06-25
    Repository Name: EPIC Alfred Wegener Institut
    Type: Conference , NonPeerReviewed
    Format: application/pdf
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  • 8
    Publication Date: 2013-06-25
    Repository Name: EPIC Alfred Wegener Institut
    Type: Conference , NonPeerReviewed
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  • 9
    Publication Date: 2013-06-25
    Repository Name: EPIC Alfred Wegener Institut
    Type: Conference , NonPeerReviewed
    Format: application/pdf
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  • 10
    Publication Date: 2013-12-17
    Description: Over the past ten years the Alfred Wegener Institute for Polar and Marine Research (AWI) has been conducting research along the coast of the Canadian Beaufort Sea. The capabilities and research efforts have been expanding ever since, resulting in the application of TerraSAR-X imagery for investigations into land cover changes, and subsidence. The AWI sees great potential for future applications of radar imagery at regional scales, along with the ground validation in a remote yet climatically sensitive region. The capacities offered by the TerraSAR-X platform present a unique possibility to enhance and complement existing research conducted by the AWI based on remotely sensed optical data (e.g. SPOT, GEOEYE, etc.). Possible research directions involve change tracking of permafrost degradation (e.g. thermokarst features such as retrogressive thaw slumps and lakes), quantification of coastal erosion, vegetation community change, vegetation structure, surface water and surface moisture investigations, and fast ice mapping. In addition, the applicability of TerraSAR-X data for investigations into wetland- and tundra vegetation, and land disturbances would be investigated. These investigations would make use of the TSX stripmap and scansar mode acquisitions already available in the archive, and future TSX acquisitions in 2013.
    Repository Name: EPIC Alfred Wegener Institut
    Type: Conference , NonPeerReviewed
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