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  • 1
    Publication Date: 2018-08-28
    Description: Pairing scientific and traditional knowledge approaches is crucial to understanding the fate of environmental systems under ongoing climate change; however creating a bridge between non-local, non-indigenous research scientists and traditional knowledge holders in northern communities brings its own challenges. In an IASC cross-cutting initiative, Fellows of the Terrestrial, Cryosphere and Marine Working Groups organized a workshop on “Community-based Research: Do`s and Don`ts of Arctic Research” bringing together young researchers with resident Arctic representatives and experts to discuss best practices in the exchange of traditional and scientific knowledge and in conducting research in northern communities. The format and organization of the workshop allowed an interactive and fruitful discussion, generating a diverse list of Arctic Research considerations and sustainable practices. An extensive list of positive (Do`s) and few negative recommendations (Don`ts) was generated together with the young researchers and Arctic representatives, including considerations of (1) the research design and early planning, (2) the contribution of science to northern communities, (3) the relationship of researchers and indigenous people, (4) the communication and overall impression of visiting scientists and (5) ways to get involved with local people. This study is a good example of bottom-up strategy development to enhance knowledge transfer between scientists and indigenous communities.
    Repository Name: EPIC Alfred Wegener Institut
    Type: Conference , NonPeerReviewed , info:eu-repo/semantics/conferenceObject
    Format: application/pdf
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  • 2
    Publication Date: 2018-08-28
    Description: Combining scientific and traditional knowledge is crucial to understand environmental systems across circum-Arctic regions, where climate change is most striking. However, building collaborative partnerships between visiting scientists and local, indigenous traditional knowledge holders in Northern communities presents challenges. The workshop “Community-based Research: Do`s and Don`ts of Arctic Research” was organized as an IASC cross-cutting initiative at ICOP2016 in Potsdam, Germany, to facilitate dialogue between Early Career Researchers (ECRs) and Northern residents. This workshop resulted in a diverse list of considerations and sustainable practices to improve traditional and scientific knowledge exchange, and collaborative Northern research. An extensive list of positive (Do`s) and few negative recommendations (Don`ts) was generated together with ECRs and Arctic representatives. Many good ideas on research design, active communication and community involvement developed from fruitful discussions. This study provides an example of bottom-up strategy development in order to enhance knowledge transfer between scientists and northern indigenous communities.
    Repository Name: EPIC Alfred Wegener Institut
    Type: Conference , NonPeerReviewed , info:eu-repo/semantics/conferenceObject
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  • 3
    Publication Date: 2017-05-29
    Description: Research in Arctic and Sub-Arctic environments presents unique challenges and obstacles, in particular, establishing a necessary baseline understanding of environmental systems in the face of ongoing climate change. Pairing scientific and traditional knowledge approaches can help to close this gap, however creating a bridge between non-local, non-indigenous research scientists and traditional knowledge holders in northern communities can be challenging. For example, most researchers are likely less familiar with local norms, customs, as well as with social systems and protocols, leading to inevitable challenges for the scientists and communities. In a cross-cutting initiative for the International Arctic Science Committee (IASC), Fellows of different the Terrestrial, Cryosphere and Marine Working Groups organized a workshop session on “Community-based Research: Do`s and Don`ts of Arctic Research” during the Young Researchers Workshop at the 11th International Conference on Permafrost in Potsdam, Germany, June 2016. This workshop brought together Early Career Scientists (ECS, including engineers) with resident Arctic representatives and experts to discuss best practices in the exchange of traditional and modern knowledge when conducting research in northern communities. After a short presentation by the panelists, ECSs with invited experts split into small groups with an IASC Fellow as moderator. The break-out groups discussed their experiences and raised questions for the invited experts. These discussions generated a list of “do’s and don’ts” from each group, which were presented and discussed with the larger audiences. The format and organization of the workshop allowed an interactive and fruitful discussion, generating a diverse list of Arctic Research considerations and best practices. Key ideas from the workshop discussions are visualized in the word cloud figure. Recommendations from this workshop included enhancing future support opportunities, like the IASC cross-cutting initiative, to facilitate continued discussions between scientists and northern representatives to maximize the benefits of pairing traditional and modern knowledge to face future challenges.
    Repository Name: EPIC Alfred Wegener Institut
    Type: Conference , NonPeerReviewed , info:eu-repo/semantics/conferenceObject
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  • 4
    Publication Date: 2016-06-07
    Description: Although there has been much research into intelligent tutoring systems (ITS), there are few authoring systems available that support ITS metaphors. Instructional developers are generally obliged to use tools designed for creating on-line books. We are currently developing an authoring environment derived from NASA's research on intelligent computer-aided training (ICAT). The ICAT metaphor, currently in use at NASA has proven effective in disciplines from satellite deployment to high school physics. This technique provides a personal trainer (PT) who instructs the student using a simulated work environment (SWE). The PT acts as a tutor, providing individualized instruction and assistance to each student. Teaching in an SWE allows the student to learn tasks by doing them, rather than by reading about them. This authoring environment will expedite ICAT development by providing a tool set that guides the trainer modeling process. Additionally, this environment provides a vehicle for distributing NASA's ICAT technology to the private sector.
    Keywords: Computer Programming and Software
    Type: Dual-Use Space Technology Transfer Conference and Exhibition, Volume 2; 584-594; NASA-CP-3263
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  • 5
    Publication Date: 2014-12-14
    Print ISSN: 0022-1430
    Electronic ISSN: 1727-5652
    Topics: Geography , Geosciences
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  • 6
    Publication Date: 2017-01-24
    Description: The Torngat Mountains National Park, northern Labrador, Canada, contains more than 120 small glaciers: the only remaining glaciers in continental northeast North America. These small cirque glaciers exist in a unique topo-climatic setting, experiencing temperate maritime summer conditions yet very cold and dry winters, and may provide insights into the deglaciation dynamics of similar small glaciers in temperate mountain settings. Due to their size and remote location, very little information exists regarding the health of these glaciers. Just a single study has been published on the contemporary glaciology of the Torngat Mountains, focusing on net mass balances from 1981 to 1984. This paper addresses the extent to which glaciologically relevant climate variables have changed in northern Labrador in concert with 20th-century Arctic warming, and how these changes have affected Torngat Mountain glaciers. Field surveys and remote-sensing analyses were used to measure regional glacier area loss of 27% from 1950 to 2005, substantial rates of ice surface thinning (up to 6myr−1) and volume losses at Abraham, Hidden, and Minaret glaciers, between 2005 and 2011. Glacier mass balances appear to be controlled by variations in winter precipitation and, increasingly, by strong summer and autumn atmospheric warming since the early 1990s, though further observations are required to fully understand mass balance sensitivities. This study provides the first comprehensive contemporary assessment of Labrador glaciers and will inform both regional impact assessments and syntheses of global glacier mass balance.
    Print ISSN: 1994-0416
    Electronic ISSN: 1994-0424
    Topics: Geography , Geosciences
    Published by Copernicus on behalf of European Geosciences Union (EGU).
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  • 7
    Publication Date: 2018-08-16
    Description: Bodies of peatland permafrost were examined at five sites along a 300km transect spanning the isolated patches permafrost zone in the coastal barrens of southeastern Labrador. Mean annual air temperatures ranged from +1∘C in the south (latitude 51.4∘N) to −1.1∘C in the north (53.7∘N) while mean ground temperatures at the top of the permafrost varied respectively from −0.7 to −2.3∘C with shallow active layers (40–60cm) throughout. Small surface offsets due to wind scouring of snow from the crests of palsas and peat plateaux, and large thermal offsets due to thick peat are critical to permafrost, which is absent in wetland and forested and forest–tundra areas inland, notwithstanding average air temperatures much lower than near the coast. Most permafrost peatland bodies are less than 5m thick, with a maximum of 10m, with steep geothermal gradients. One-dimensional thermal modelling for two sites showed that they are in equilibrium with the current climate, but the permafrost mounds are generally relict and could not form today without the low snow depths that result from a heaved peat surface. Despite the warm permafrost, model predictions using downscaled global warming scenarios (RCP2.6, RCP4.5, and RCP8.5) indicate that perennially frozen ground will thaw from the base up and may persist at the southern site until the middle of the 21st century. At the northern site, permafrost is more resilient, persisting to the 2060s under RCP8.5, the 2090s under RCP4.5, or beyond the 21st century under RCP2.6. Despite evidence of peatland permafrost degradation in the study region, the local-scale modelling suggests that the southern boundary of permafrost may not move north as quickly as previously hypothesized.
    Print ISSN: 1994-0416
    Electronic ISSN: 1994-0424
    Topics: Geography , Geosciences
    Published by Copernicus on behalf of European Geosciences Union (EGU).
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  • 8
    Publication Date: 2018-01-04
    Description: Bodies of peatland permafrost were examined at five sites along a 300 km transect spanning the isolated patches permafrost zone in the coastal barrens of southeastern Labrador. Mean annual air temperatures ranged from +1 °C in the south (latitude 51.4° N) to −1.1 °C in the north (53.7° N) while mean ground temperatures at the top of permafrost varied respectively from −0.7 °C to −2.3 °C with shallow active layers (40–60 cm) throughout. Small surface offsets due to wind scouring of snow from the crests of palsas and peat plateaux, and large thermal offsets due to thick peat are critical to permafrost, which is therefore absent in wetland, forested and forest-tundra areas inland, notwithstanding average air temperatures much lower than near the coast. Most permafrost peatland bodies are less than 5 m thick with a maximum of 10 m with steep geothermal gradients. One-dimensional thermal modelling for two sites showed that they are in equilibrium with the current climate, but the permafrost mounds are generally relict and could not form today without the low snow depths that result from a heaved peat surface. Despite the warm permafrost, model predictions using downscaled global warming scenarios (RCP2.6, 4.5 and 8.5) indicate that perennially frozen ground will thaw from the base up and may persist at the southern site until the middle of the 21st Century. At the northern site, permafrost is more resilient, persisting to the 2060s under RCP8.5, the 2090s under RCP4.5, or beyond the 21st century under RCP2.6. Despite evidence of peatland permafrost degradation in the study region, the local-scale modelling suggests that the southern boundary of permafrost may not move as quickly as had previously been thought.
    Print ISSN: 1994-0432
    Electronic ISSN: 1994-0440
    Topics: Geography , Geosciences
    Published by Copernicus on behalf of European Geosciences Union (EGU).
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  • 9
    Publication Date: 2013-05-15
    Print ISSN: 1748-9318
    Electronic ISSN: 1748-9326
    Topics: Energy, Environment Protection, Nuclear Power Engineering
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  • 10
    Publication Date: 2016-10-01
    Print ISSN: 0008-4077
    Electronic ISSN: 1480-3313
    Topics: Geosciences
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