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  • 1
    Publication Date: 2016-11-24
    Description: Spinning cylinder rotating about its axis experiences a transverse force/lift, an account of this basic aerodynamic phenomenon is known as the Robins-Magnus effect in text books. Prandtl studied this flow by an inviscid irrotational model and postulated an upper limit of the lift experienced by the cylinder for a critical rotation rate. This non-dimensional rate is the ratio of oncoming free stream speed and the surface speed due to rotation. Prandtl predicted a maximum lift coefficient as C L max = 4 π for the critical rotation rate of two. In recent times, evidences show the violation of this upper limit, as in the experiments of Tokumaru and Dimotakis [“The lift of a cylinder executing rotary motions in a uniform flow,” J. Fluid Mech. 255 , 1–10 (1993)] and in the computed solution in Sengupta et al. [“Temporal flow instability for Magnus–robins effect at high rotation rates,” J. Fluids Struct. 17 , 941–953 (2003)]. In the latter reference, this was explained as the temporal instability affecting the flow at higher Reynolds number and rotation rates (〉2). Here, we analyze the flow past a rotating cylinder at a super-critical rotation rate (=2.5) by the enstrophy-based proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) of direct simulation results. POD identifies the most energetic modes and helps flow field reconstruction by reduced number of modes. One of the motivations for the present study is to explain the shedding of puffs of vortices at low Reynolds number ( Re = 60), for the high rotation rate, due to an instability originating in the vicinity of the cylinder, using the computed Navier-Stokes equation (NSE) from t = 0 to t = 300 following an impulsive start. This instability is also explained through the disturbance mechanical energy equation, which has been established earlier in Sengupta et al. [“Temporal flow instability for Magnus–robins effect at high rotation rates,” J. Fluids Struct. 17 , 941–953 (2003)].
    Print ISSN: 1070-6631
    Electronic ISSN: 1089-7666
    Topics: Physics
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  • 2
    Publication Date: 2018-11-27
    Description: Author(s): Pushpender Sharma, Tapan K. Sengupta, and Swagata Bhaumik A three-dimensional (3D) transition route for zero-pressure-gradient boundary layer over a flat plate is computationally investigated, for impulsive and nonimpulsive startup of harmonic wall excitation. A monochromatic frequency of excitation is chosen to perturb the boundary layer. The exciter plac... [Phys. Rev. E 98, 053106] Published Mon Nov 26, 2018
    Keywords: Fluid Dynamics
    Print ISSN: 1539-3755
    Electronic ISSN: 1550-2376
    Topics: Physics
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  • 3
    Publication Date: 2016-09-07
    Description: Direct numerical simulations of Rayleigh-Taylor instability (RTI) between two air masses with a temperature difference of 70 K is presented using compressible Navier-Stokes formulation in a non-equilibrium thermodynamic framework. The two-dimensional flow is studied in an isolated box with non-periodic walls in both vertical and horizontal directions. The non-conducting interface separating the two air masses is impulsively removed at t = 0 (depicting a heaviside function). No external perturbation has been used at the interface to instigate the instability at the onset. Computations have been carried out for rectangular and square cross sections. The formulation is free of Boussinesq approximation commonly used in many Navier-Stokes formulations for RTI. Effect of Stokes’ hypothesis is quantified, by using models from acoustic attenuation measurement for the second coefficient of viscosity from two experiments. Effects of Stokes’ hypothesis on growth of mixing layer and evolution of total entropy for the Rayleigh-Taylor system are reported. The initial rate of growth is observed to be independent of Stokes’ hypothesis and the geometry of the box. Following this stage, growth rate is dependent on the geometry of the box and is sensitive to the model used. As a consequence of compressible formulation, we capture pressure wave-packets with associated reflection and rarefaction from the non-periodic walls. The pattern and frequency of reflections of pressure waves noted specifically at the initial stages are reflected in entropy variation of the system.
    Print ISSN: 1070-6631
    Electronic ISSN: 1089-7666
    Topics: Physics
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