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  • 1
    Publication Date: 2019-01-31
    Type: Dataset
    Format: text/tab-separated-values, 794 data points
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  • 2
    Publication Date: 2019-01-31
    Type: Dataset
    Format: text/tab-separated-values, 593 data points
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  • 3
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    PANGAEA
    In:  Supplement to: Rovere, Alessio; Raymo, Maureen E; Vacchi, Matteo; Lorscheid, Thomas; Stocchi, Paolo; Gómez-Pujol, Lluís; Harris, Daniel L; Casella, Elisa; O'Leary, Michael J; Hearty, Paul J (2016): The analysis of Last Interglacial (MIS 5e) relative sea-level indicators: reconstructing sea-level in a warmer world. Earth-Science Reviews, 159, 404-427, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.earscirev.2016.06.006
    Publication Date: 2019-04-30
    Description: The Last Interglacial (MIS 5e, 128-116 ka) is among the most studied past periods in Earth's history. The climate at that time was warmer than today, primarily due to different orbital conditions, with smaller ice sheets and higher sea-level. Field evidence for MIS 5e sea-level was reported from thousands of sites, but often paleo shorelines were measured with low-accuracy techniques and, in some cases, there are contrasting interpretations about paleo sea-level reconstructions. For this reason, large uncertainties still surround both the maximum sea-level attained as well as the pattern of sea-level change throughout MIS 5e. Such uncertainties are exacerbated by the lack of a uniform approach to measuring and interpreting the geological evidence of paleo sea-levels. In this review, we discuss the characteristics of MIS 5e field observations, and we set the basis for a standardized approach to MIS 5e paleo sea-level reconstructions, that is already successfully applied in Holocene sea-level research. Application of the standard definitions and methodologies described in this paper will enhance our ability to compare data from different research groups and different areas, in order to gain deeper insights into MIS 5e sea-level changes. Improving estimates of Last Interglacial sea-level is, in turn, a key to understanding the behavior of ice sheets in a warmer world.
    Type: Dataset
    Format: application/octet-stream, 263.0 kBytes
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  • 4
    Publication Date: 2018-09-27
    Description: Paleo relative sea-level (RSL) indicators formed during the Marine Isotope Stage (MIS) 5e have been reported by a large number of studies worldwide. Despite this, three main aspects are seldom reported: (1) use of high-precision survey techniques applied to MIS 5e RSL indicators; (2) application of modern analogs to understand the indicative meaning of MIS 5e RSL indicators; (3) estimates of the effects of glacial isostatic adjustment (GIA) on the MIS 5e records. In this study, we show how the three points above have been addressed in a focused study on Last Interglacial outcrops on the island of Mallorca. We measured the elevation of several RSL indicators with high-accuracy differential GPS (vertical accuracies down to 0.1 m) and we established the relationship between each RSL indicator and the paleo sea level through calculation of the indicative meaning for each RSL indicator. In particular, we present a novel technique to calculate the indicative meaning of fossil beach deposits with a phase-averaged morphodynamic model (CSHORE). We show how this approach helps overcoming difficulties with the survey of the modern analogs for these indicators. Our results show that two paleo RSLs are imprinted in Mallorca at + 2.9 ± 0.8 m and + 11.3 ± 1.0 m. We then compare our field-based results with modelled paleo RSL, calculated from the predictions of the ice-earth coupled ANICE-SELEN model, using few different ice-sheet melting scenarios during MIS 5e. We conclude that indicative ranges can be derived from relatively simple morphodynamic models and that the comparison of field-derived and modelled RSL values is a good method to validate possible scenarios of MIS 5e sea-level variability, especially in absence of precise dating.
    Type: Dataset
    Format: text/tab-separated-values, 304 data points
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  • 5
    Publication Date: 2018-12-03
    Type: Dataset
    Format: text/tab-separated-values, 26 data points
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  • 6
    Publication Date: 2018-02-28
    Description: Precisely quantifying the current climate-related sea level change requires accurate knowledge of long-term geological processes known as Glacial Isostatic Adjustments (GIA). Although the major postglacial melting phase is likely to have ended ∼6–4 ka BP (before present), GIA is still significantly affecting the present-day vertical position of the mean sea surface and the sea bottom. Here we present empirical rsl (relative sea level) data based on U/Th dated fossil corals from reef platforms of the Society Islands, French Polynesia, together with the corresponding GIA-modeling. Fossil coral data constrain the timing and amplitude of rsl variations after the Holocene sea level maximum (HSLM). Upon correction for isostatic island subsidence, we find that local rsl was at least ∼1.5 ± 0.4 m higher than present at ∼5.4 ka. Later, minor amplitude variations occurred until ∼2 ka, when the rsl started dropping to its present position with a rate of ∼0.4 mm/yr. The data match with predicted rsl curves based on global ice-sheet chronologies confirming the role of GIA-induced ocean siphoning effect throughout the mid to late Holocene. A long lasting Late Holocene highstand superimposed with second-order amplitudinal fluctuations as seen from our data suggest that the theoretical predicted timing of rsl change can still be refined pending future calibration.
    Type: Article , PeerReviewed
    Format: text
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  • 7
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    PANGAEA
    In:  Supplement to: Lorscheid, Thomas; Felis, Thomas; Stocchi, Paolo; Obert, J Christina; Scholz, Denis; Rovere, Alessio (2017): Tides in the Last Interglacial: insights from notch geometry and palaeo tidal models in Bonaire, Netherland Antilles. Scientific Reports, 7(1), https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-017-16285-6
    Publication Date: 2019-02-13
    Description: The study of past sea levels relies largely on the interpretation of sea-level indicators. Palaeo tidal notches are considered as one of the most precise sea-level indicators as their formation is closely tied to the local tidal range. We present geometric measurements of modern and palaeo (Marine Isotope Stage (MIS) 5e) tidal notches on Bonaire (southern Caribbean Sea) and results from two tidal simulations, using the present-day bathymetry and a palaeo-bathymetry. We use these two tools to investigate changes in the tidal range since MIS 5e. Our models show that the tidal range changes most significantly in shallow areas, whereas both, notch geometry and models results, suggest that steeper continental shelves, such as the ones bordering the island of Bonaire, are less affected to changes in tidal range in conditions of MIS 5e sea levels. We use our data and results to discuss the importance of considering changes in tidal range while reconstructing MIS 5e sea level histories, and we remark that it is possible to use hydrodynamic modelling and notch geometry as first-order proxies to assess whether, in a particular area, tidal range might have been different in MIS 5e with respect to today.
    Type: Dataset
    Format: application/zip, 2 datasets
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  • 8
    Publication Date: 2019-07-29
    Type: Dataset
    Format: text/tab-separated-values, 270 data points
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  • 9
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    PANGAEA
    In:  Supplement to: Rovere, Alessio; Casella, Elisa; Harris, Daniel L; Lorscheid, Thomas; Nandasena, Napayalage A K; Dyer, Blake; Sandstrom, Michael R; Stocchi, Paolo; D'Andrea, William J; Raymo, Maureen E (2017): Giant boulders and Last Interglacial storm intensity in the North Atlantic. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 114(46), 12144-12149, https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1712433114
    Publication Date: 2019-10-26
    Description: As global climate warms and sea level rises, coastal areas will be subject to more frequent extreme flooding and hurricanes. Geologic evidence for extreme coastal storms during past warm periods has the potential to provide fundamental insights into their future intensity. Recent studies argue that during the Last Interglacial (MIS 5e, ~128-116 ka) tropical and extratropical North Atlantic cyclones may have been more intense than at present, and may have produced waves larger than those observed historically. Such strong swells are inferred to have created a number of geologic features that can be observed today along the coastlines of Bermuda and the Bahamas. In this paper, we investigate the most iconic among these features: massive boulders atop a cliff in North Eleuthera, Bahamas. We combine geologic field surveys, wave models, and boulder transport equations to test the hypothesis that such boulders must have been emplaced by storms of greater-than-historical intensity. By contrast, our results suggest that with the higher relative sea level (RSL) estimated for the Bahamas during MIS 5e, boulders of this size could have been transported by waves generated by storms of historical intensity. Thus, while the megaboulders of Eleuthera cannot be used as geologic proof for past "superstorms," they do show that with rising sea levels, cliffs and coastal barriers will be subject to significantly greater erosional energy, even without changes in storm intensity.
    Type: Dataset
    Format: application/zip, 5432.0 MBytes
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  • 10
    Publication Date: 2014-06-07
    Description: Precisely quantifying the current climate-related sea level change requires accurate knowledge of long-term geological processes known as Glacial Isostatic Adjustments (GIA). Although the major post-glacial melting phase is likely to have ended ~6-4 ka BP (before present), GIA is still significantly affecting the present-day vertical position of the mean sea surface and the sea bottom. Here we present empirical rsl (relative sea level) data based on U/Th dated fossil corals from reef platforms of the Society Islands, French Polynesia, together with the corresponding GIA-modelling. Fossil coral data constrains the timing and amplitude of rsl-variations after the Holocene sea level maximum (HSLM). Upon correction for isostatic island subsidence, we find that local rsl was at least ~1.5±0.4 m higher than present at ~5.4 ka. Later, minor amplitude variations occurred until ~2 ka, when the rsl started dropping to its present position with a rate of ~0.4 mm/year. The data match with predicted rsl curves based on global ice-sheet chronologies confirming the role of GIA-induced ocean siphoning effect throughout the mid to late Holocene. A long lasting Late Holocene highstand superimposed with second order amplitudinal fluctuations as seen from our data suggest that the theoretical predicted timing of rsl change can still be refined pending future calibration.
    Electronic ISSN: 1525-2027
    Topics: Chemistry and Pharmacology , Geosciences , Physics
    Published by Wiley on behalf of American Geophysical Union (AGU).
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